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Image from page 418 of “Biennial report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, state of Montana” (1894)
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Identifier: biennialrep191622ortofmontrich
Title: Biennial report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, state of Montana
Year: 1894 (1890s)
Authors: Montana. Dept. of Public Instruction
Subjects: Montana. Dept. of Public Instruction Education
Publisher: Helena, Mont. : State Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Montana State Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Montana State Library

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Total 1,412 Doubtless there were other teachers at Missoula who were enrolledbut were not working for certificate credit. At Lewistown and MilesCity, where high school work was offered, there may have beenteachers, who have not yet completed high school, enrolled for thosecourses. It is interesting to note the per cent of elementary school teachersin each county who attended the summer schools at Dillon or theregional summer schools affiliated with the State Normal College,where practically all the training for elementary teachers was con-ducted. Table 28. SHOWING PERCENT OF ELEMENTARY TEACHERS ATTENDINGSUMMER SCHOOL IN 1922. Counties With High Records ♦Custer 89% Golden Valley 54% ♦Yellowstone 53% ♦Beaverhead 44% ♦Fergus 41% Ravalli 40% Treasure 38% Roosevelt 37% Daniels 35% Wheatland …_. 33% Rosebud 32^> Counties With Low Records Liberty 6% Sweet Grass 6% Sanders 7% Dawson 8% Toole 8% Wbiaux 8% Blaine 9% Granite 9% ♦Counties in which summer schools were held in 1922.

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Augusta Consolidated School 46 SEVENTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT Consolidation In 1920-21 there were 86 consolidated schools in Montana, 19 inthe open country and 53 in small towns. The problem of transportation is by far the greatest in connectionwith consolidation in Montana. The average distance the 3,293 pupilstransported go was 4.3 miles one way but there was a variation in thedistance pupils are transported from a few miles to 8 or 10 miles. Thelongest distance for transportation was 18 miles. The number of pupilsfor each conveyance averaged 20.6. The cost of transportation variedfrom 15 cents to 83 cents per pupil per day, the average being 33 cents. Unfortunately in the majority of districts drivers of conveyancesare selected by competitive bids which does not always insure a re-sponsible citizen to take care of the children under his charge. Driverssalaries ranged from .00 to 5.00 per month, the average being.30. In only a few districts are drivers required to give bonds,

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Image from web page 268 of “modern-day financial practices and useful lender bookkeeping; illustrated with over 2 hundred kinds of bank publications, files and blanks” (1903)
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Identifier: modernbankingmet00barr
Title: Contemporary banking methods and useful lender accounting; illustrated with over two hundred kinds of bank publications, documents and blanks
Year: 1903 (1900s)
Authors: Barrett, Albert R
Topics: Banks and financial
Publisher: New York, Bankers Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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rom the clearing-house the balances because of them, forwhich they provide their receipts in a book for the purpose. To enforce the required control among the list of lender clerks in theclearing-house the device of fines pointed out is really as uses: TUB CLEARING-HOUSE. 257 Errors on credit part of settling clerks sheet Errors on debit part of settling clerks sheet 3 mistakes in tickets 2 mistakes in ground amount got 1 Disorderly conduct 3 wish of punctuality 3 Debtor banks failing continually to spend balances by 1.30 p. m 3 Errors in distribution on bill of exchanges 1 The fines are charged every day on respective financial institutions, and at theclose of per month a statement of those is delivered to the financial institutions. Fig. 170shows the form of this declaration. No 2:^ ]Sfew Yoi^k Cleki^irig Bou^e, 77-83 CEDAR STNew York, C^-t^^^^c-^ *^/ i^oft. Sir:As needed by the Circularof the Clearing home Committee dated Aug. 8th, 1854,1 report the following fines against your lender for themonth of_..ii!^^^^?-^<^r<rr<*?^^^Zras employs, viz.: 6

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Fines the thirty days total- «__- Financial institutions fined. Fig. 170. Respectfully yours, WILLIAM SHERER. Manager. -Clearing-House Report of Fines. The establishment regarding the clearing-house features proved an importantfactor in the marketing of sound financial. Besides the requirementof the everyday settlement of balances, the weekly statement of theassociated banking institutions is obligatory. This statement is madeupon a blank prepared for the purpose. These blanks tend to be printedupon white paper for connected banking institutions and on red report forbanks being non-members. Fig. 171 shows one of these simple blanks.From these once a week statements the Manager of clearing-house 17 26S CONTEMPORARY BANKING METHODS. compiles two statements of all of the banking institutions, one representing the asso-ciated finance companies additionally the other the non-member finance companies. These state-ments are imprinted and furnished every single member and non-member,and posted in the documents, and this promotion is a safeguard.Figs. 172, 173 and 174 show these reports for August 11, 1900.

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Image from page 243 of “Our country in story” (1917)
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Identifier: ourcountryinstor00fran
Subject: Our nation in tale
12 Months: 1917 (1910s)
Writers: Franciscan Sisters for the Perpetual Adoration (La Crosse, Wis.)
Topics: United Says — History America — Discovery and research
Publisher: Chicago, Nyc, Scott, Foresman and organization
Adding Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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CAPTURE OF ENGLISH COMMANDER nobody thought of resisting, neither performed any one thinkof continuing the dance, but all fled to full cover up away in thedarkness of their homes dreading just what the morningmight bring. When it comes to English had taught their Frenchand Indian topics to phone the Americans Big Knives andto fear all of them rather just as much as the worst of savages. To strengthen the Kaskaskians within idea and therebyto frighten all of them into submitting, as it had been, Clarkstroops, in the signal of three rifle reports, began up suchhideous whooping and scalp-hallooing as may have 238 your COUNTRY IN STORY

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provided credit into many savage redmen. Once the blood-curdling records echoed and re-echoed from the bluffs be-yond, the poor individuals shrieked and trembled. The Amer-icans are Big Knives indeed, said they, and then we havenothing a lot better than captivity, torture, and death to ex-pect from their website. Meanwhile athletes had been speeding through streetsof the town purchasing individuals under discomfort of demise to help keep close within doorways. At length the crowing of cocks revealed thedawn for the new day. The hot Julysun shortly overcome straight down upon Kaskaskia.nevertheless charming small houses with theirsloping roofs and wide porches re-mained darkened, the doorways sealed,and the garden walks deserted. Thechurch bell tolled forth unfortunate and mourn-FATHER GIBAULT fui tones therefore unlike its cheerypeals of the past evening. While all was thuswrapped in quiet dread, a man clad in a flowing blackrobe had been seen to accelerate quietly along the lifeless streetsin the direction associated with fort. His whole bearing bespokedignity, courage, a

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Image from page 354 of “Mayor’s message and reports of town officers” (1918)
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Identifier: mayorsmessage19162balt
Title: Mayor’s message and reports for the town officials
Year: 1918 (1910s)
Writers: Baltimore (Md.). Mayor
Subjects:
Publisher: Baltimore
Adding Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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lt;i;azines, legislative bills ofother shows, newsprint clippings, duplicate copies of someof the greater amount of important i)amphlets and papers, articlesclipped from publications, also a conqtlete tile of thebills during the last five sessions for the Maryland Legislature. The total ex])endi1ures of Department when it comes to year linOwere |3,8-t0. The otbcials of this town and State are many cour-teous in furnishing the division with reports, informa-tion, etc., when therefore requested, and I also want to simply take this occa- DIVISION OF LEGISLATIVE GUIDE. 9 siou Jigaiu l<» offer my liejirt.v tliaiiks^for their important co-operation and assistance. I also desire to simply take this celebration once again to coniiiiend tlieindustrious and efficient work of my assistants, Misses EllaS. Hitchcock and Nellie W.Mewshaw. Very respectfully posted, Horace E. Flack,EwGCutive. FIFTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT Board of Park Commissioners Mayor and City Council of Baltimore FOR THE FISCAL SEASON ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1916

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baltimore King Brothers city printer 1917 Report of Board of Park Commissioners Baltimore, March 15, 1917. To flic Manor and City Council of Balliiiiore,Haiti much more. Mil. (tExtle.men: We .siil)iiiit these report of the Departiiieut forthe year 1910: The Park Tax receipts, Avliich it had been expected in makingiil» the bndget for year 191() would anioimt to .|640,300.00,did maybe not reach thai figure, the total amount amassed becoming |625,-431.51. The disbursements for many reasons excepting park exten-sion made during 12 months amounted to |(»10,905.26, and thisDepartment had to its credit during the close of the year |59,-Nol.74, from which bills sustained throughout the 12 months, butunpaid because unpresented, amounting to |30,732.65, wereto be compensated. The Board will pay from the receipts certain annual fixedcharges comprising surface rents on playground residential property amount-ing annually to |(>,820.12, and of sinking-fund requirementsand interest on town stock, the profits of which Avere usedfor areas,

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Image from web page 6 of “Sessional documents associated with Dominion of Canada 1905” (1905)
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Identifier: n11sessionalpaper39canauoft
Title: Sessional papers of Dominion of Canada 1905
Year: 1905 (1900s)
Writers: Canada. Parliament
Subjects: Canada — Politics and federal government 1867- Periodicals
Publisher: [Ottawa : s.n.
Adding Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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19 .54 Grantexceeded. $ cts. 2,682 47 95 43 2,777 90 (il .58 7 0338 22 106 83 INDIAN TRUST FUND 16d SESSIONAL PAPER No. 27 INDIAN TRUST FUND. Return C showing deals regarding the the Fund during 12 months ended June 30, 1904. Service. Balance, June 30, 1903. Range.s on land product sales ; timber and rock dues ; rents, fines and costs. Interest for jear ended June 30, 1904, on above balance Legislative funds to augment the funds Outstanding cheques for 1901-02 Expenditure during the 12 months 1903-04., , Balance, Summer 30, 1904 Debit. Credit. S cts. 322,227 614,47(3,907 81 $ cts. ,408,912 57 182,580 83 176,926 89 30,706 06 9 07 4,799,135 42 4,799,135 42 For additional information on the above expenditure through the Indian Trust Fund additionally the Consoliuated Fund,see role J associated with Auditor Generals Report. 27—ii—12

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VOLUME XXXTX ^ ^f» 5 Edw. Vir. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. A. 1905 itsrSee additionally Numerical record, web page 5. Ai^PHABETICAL INDEX OF THE SESSIONAL PAPERS OF PARLIAMENT OF CANADA FIRST SESSION. TENTH PARLIAMENT, 190 5. A Adulteration of Food Agriculture, Annual Rejiort Agriculture Conunittee Alberta Postal company Aliens, job of . Aluminum Anthracite Coal Arbitration-Intercolonial vs. (t.T.R. Archives, Canadian Auditor Genei-al, Annual Report .. . .Autonomy in North-west R Bait Freezers Banks, Chartered Banks, Unpaid Balances in Benrier, J. P Blair, Hon. A. G Bonds and Securities department Royal Mint British Canadian Loan and Investment Co. Cables regarding the Empire Canada-Cape Breton Accident 6. Canada Eastern Railway Canadian Cattle Canadian Loan and Investment Co Canadian Pacific Railway :— Business with Interior Department Lands sold by Caplin and Paspebiac Railway Chartered Banks . Chateau-Richer Civil Provider:— Appointments and Promotions G9. Examiners Insurance Lin11sessionalpaper39canauoft

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Image from web page 427 of “St. Thomas’s Hospital reports” (1836)
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Identifier: stthomasshospita27stth
Title: St. Thomas’s Hospital reports
Year: 1836 (1830s)
Writers: St. Thomas’s Hospital (London, England)
Topics: Medicine,Clinical
Publisher: London, St. Thomas’s Hospital [etc.]
Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Understanding Commons

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ast associated with Peloponnesus, and from thatcolonies had been established in several places, many famousbeing at Athens, Pergamos, Cos, Mycenae, and Cnidos. Thatat Cos had been mentioned since the votive tablets here, which,unfortunately, haven’t already been recovered, contained a morecomplete medical record compared to the other individuals ; and some of themwere often quoted by early article writers since the Prognoses ofCos. Hippocrates, who belonged into the cult, is stated tohave been indebted to these tablets in writing his aphorisms. Whenever Rome was indeed ravaged by pestilence, an oracle inB.C. 293 informed the Romans to bring ^sculapius from hisgreat sanctuary at Epidaurus. A deputation had been sent, anda serpent arrived on the scene for the temple, glided down to the shore,and ensconced it self into the captains cabin. Some priestsaccompanied it. When the ship reached the lips of theTiber the serpent slipped overboard, swam to an island, andcurled up indeed there. Using this arrival the pestilence ceased.A temple ended up being built, plus the shrine of ^sculapius ended up being for

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^sculcq-jius and his Sanctuary. 403 centui-ies paid with miraculous remedies ; and also at thepresent time there is a popular belief in miraculous treatments atthe same destination, although fame is given to mediaeval saints,and not to ever the Greek god. The Sanctuary of ^sculapius. The largest and most famous regarding the sanctuaries was atEpidaurus ; and. as recent excavations help united states to realisewhat the structures and arrangements there have been, a shortaccount from it may be given before explaining what’s knownof the strategy of therapy. The damages are found in the centre of a superb available valleyscreened by picturesque mountains 2000 foot large, plus the site isstill called To lioov (The Sanctuary) by the peasants. Itextended over a large location, and, besides temples to iEscula-pius. Aphrodite, and Artemis, and large dormitories aswards in which the cures had been effected, contained, a race-course, an immense theatre—one of the very perfect yetexcavated,—a music-hall, and hostels for clients to lodgein, and luxuri

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Image from page 124 of “initial report from the geology of east main Minnesota such as the Cuyuna iron-ore district” (1918)
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Identifier: preliminaryrepor00hard
Title: Initial report regarding geology of eastern central Minnesota including the Cuyuna iron-ore district
Year: 1918 (1910s)
Writers: Harder, Edmund Cecil, 1882- Johnston, A. Walfred, writer Geological Research (U.S.)
Topics: Geology Iron mines and mining
Publisher: Minneapolis, University of Minnesota
Contributing Library: Wellesley College Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Associate Libraries

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he iron-ore area. The Cuyuna number part associated with Minneapolis, St. Paul, and SaultSte. Marie railway renders the Duluth-Winnipeg part for this roadway atLawler and runs westward through Aitkin to Iron Hub. Right here it divides,a northern part planning Manganese and a southern part throughCuyuna, Crosby, and Ironton, to Riverton. Various mines are connectedwith the primary outlines by part railways. HISTORY OF THE AREA That iron-ore might-be present in east main Minnesota had been sus-pected a long time before its real finding. It is known that when the NorthernPacific Railway studies the current road had been being made previousto 1870, through what’s now the Cuyuna region, indications of thepresence of iron ore were found,81 due probably to compass disturbancesbeing noted. Mention of variants in th« path for the compass needle •Kellogg, L. O., Notes regarding the Cuyuna range, we and II: Eng. and Min. Sou*., to!. 96, pp.1199-1203, Dec. 27, 1913; vol. 97, pp. 7-10, Jan. 3, 1914. DISH XII

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THE CUYUNA IRON-ORE DISTRICT 97 in areas of Crow Wing County tend to be considered discovered in addition in the notesof the us government land surveyors built in the seventies, from which time theMarquette selection of north Michigan ended up being truly the only iron-ore producingdistrict in the Lake better region. It had been about 1890 whenever first magnetized surveys were made in eastcentral Minnesota for the true purpose of locating areas of abnormal mag-netic attraction, including are presumed to indicate the presence of ironore. Using this time through to the actual finding associated with the presence of iron-bearing formation inside Cuyuna area, throughout the summer time and fallof 1904, magnetic studies had been made at periods in numerous parts ofthe region. Sometime elapsed, but before the regularity and ex-tensiveness associated with magnetic variations were realized, and now,systematic research work progressed quickly. The majority of the very early mag-netic work had been carried out by Mr. Cuyler Adams to whom belongs a largeshare of the credit of finding and de

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Image from page 977 of “Hardware merchandising September-December 1922” (1922)
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Identifier: hardmerchsepdec1922toro
Title: Hardware merchandising September-December 1922
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors:
Subjects: Hardware industry Hardware Implements, utensils, etc Building
Publisher: Toronto :
Contributing Library: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: Algoma University, Trent University, Lakehead University, Laurentian University, Nipissing University, Ryerson University and University of Toronto Libraries

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The Popular Aluminum // interested, tear out this page and place icith letters to he answered December 2, 1922 Hardware and Metal 17 The Only Weekly Hardware Paper in Canada Member Audit Bureau of Circulations Member Associated Business Papers

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CANADA*S NATIONAL HARDWARE WEEKLY Vol. XXXIV. DECEMBER 2, 1922 No. 48 CONTENTS: No Opposition to Price Agreement if Not a Burden to Consumer. . 19 Why the Automatic Revolver is Now Banned 20 Receipt Tax Will Hamper Trade 21 Where Are We in the Business Cycle? 22 Twelve Month Aluminumware Display 23 Displays Give First Impetus to Xmas Trade 24 Some Difficulties With Cash Business •. . . . 25 What Hardwaremen Say in Their Ads 26 An Englishmans View of Canadian Hardware Trade 27 Editorial Comment 28 Events in the Trade 29 Steady Improvement in Stove Industry—News Notes of Western Canada 30 New Hardware Goods 31 Hardware Letter Box—Letters to Editor—Twenty-Five Years Ago 32 Hardware and Metal Christmas Window Contest 33 Chart of Pig Iron Production—Retail Merchants May Establish Credit Bureau 34 Weekly Hardware Market Reports—Montreal, Toronto, London, Winnipeg, Vancouver, Hamilton, St. John, Pittsburg 35-43 Women Buy Winter Paint Specialties 44 Benjamin Moore & Co. to Exp

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Image from page 467 of “Church review” (1901)
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Identifier: churchrevi01unse
Title: Church review
Year: 1901 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Youth in church work — Connecticut — Hartford — Periodicals Protestant youth — Connecticut — Hartford — Societies, etc. — Periodicals Protestant churches — Connecticut — Hartford — Societies, etc. — Periodicals Hartford (Conn.) — Church history — Periodicals
Publisher: Review Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Connecticut State Library
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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building and find himself surroundedby decorations which, in point ofvalue, would do credit to any cathe-dral in London, Paris or Rome.—R.H. Herron in Frank Leslies PopularMonthly. ministry is to equip and endow schoolsand colleges in the several missionfields.—Bishop Galloway M. E. church. Rev. John G. Patons reports forthe past year tell of eleven hundredand two South Sea Islanders won fromcannibalism to Christianity, one mis-sionary alone receiving two hundredadults into church membership. Atranslation of the New Testament intoanother of the island languages hasheen finished by Mr. Paton, and willsoon be issued. We cannot be loyal in heart and dis-ioyal in purse. During the late China-Japan war theCrown Prince of Japan was taken illand sent to the military hospital atHiroshima. A Christian and a non-Christian nurse were detailed to carefor him. One evening the prince spoketo the nurse on duty, asking her whereshe was trained. On telling him hemade reply: I thought as much. Your

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qualified to go out and enter life anew,on a higher plane. The girls aretaught sewing, baking, washing andcooking, the boys are trained in man-ual labor, and the most skeptical manneed spend but two hours in Sitka tobe profoundly impressed with a certainfact. As he passes from the vile densand low, lazy life of the Rancherie tothe neat cottages and civilized life onthe other side of the town, he goesfrom a night of darkness into a day ofsunshine; and as he returns past thecommodious mission, which stands likea blessed gateway between, he willfeel a new reverence in his heart forHim who came that men might havelife and that they might nave it moreabundantly. The remarkable missionconducted by Mr. Duncan, a lay mem-ber of the Protestant Episcopal church.is another instance in point. Mr. Dun-cans Christian Republic of nearly onethousand natives, now at New Met-lakatla, with their churches andschools, co-operative stores and salmoncanneries, is a striking illustration ofapplied religion.

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Image from page 404 of “New England aviators 1914-1918; their portraits and their records” (1919)
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Identifier: NewEnglandaviatVol1Tick
Title: New England aviators 1914-1918; their portraits and their records
Year: 1919 (1910s)
Authors: Ticknor, Caroline, 1866-1937, ed
Subjects: Biography Aeronautics World War, 1914-1918
Publisher: Boston, New York, Houghton Mifflin Company
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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orce. On Aug. 9 Lieut. Wright was sent to Squadron 218, Royal AirForce, B.E.F., where he reported for duty, with 2d Lieut. CharlesA. Needham detailed as his observer. At 5 a.m. next morning hewas ready to fly over the lines on a bombing-attack against thesubmarine docks and harbor at Ostend, which was situated at thattime fifteen miles behind the Hun lines. On Aug. 10 his record shows him to have dropped 8 25-poundbombs on the mole at Zeebrugge. He was also credited with tworaids against the submarine base at Bruges, where he was underfire from one of the most powerful Hun anti-air craft batteries. Onone of these raids the Squadron was attacked by Fokker scouts,whom he helped materially in beating off. He was ordered to re-turn to the American Escadrille, on Aug. 22, to act as instructor. In Sept. he was sent to the U.S. Naval Aircraft Base at Eastleigh,Eng., to supervise the assembling of airplanes arriving fromAmerica, and later he flew a plane across the English Channel, to [ 380 ]

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ARTHUR HOUSTOUN WRIGHT the U.S. aerodrome at the front. On Oct. 7 he piloted Capt. D. C.Hanrahan, U.S.N., across the Channel to Dover, Eng., in orderthat Hanrahan might attend an important conference with theBritish authorities, and returned flying over the Channel in aheavy fog, in order that he might be back in time to participate inthe first raid that Squadron 9 made against the Hun. On Oct. 14, with the late Gunnery Sergt David F. Price, asobserver, he flew one of 7 American-built airplanes, equipped withLiberty motors and American guns, in a bombing-raid against therailway junction at Thielt, Belgium. This raid destroyed the veryimportant railway yards and seriously hindered the Hun retreatat this strategic point. In the course of this raid 12 Boche fighting-scouts attacked the 7 American planes and 3 Germans were shotdown. All the American airplanes returned safely, although twowere so badly disabled that they were never flown again, and oneobserver was seriously wounded. This w

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