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Image from page 6 of “The Illinois central railroad company offers for sale over 1,500,000 acres selected farming and wood lands, in tracts of forty acres and upwards, to suit purchasers, on long credits and at low rates of interest, situated on each side
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Identifier: illinoiscentralr00ill
Title: The Illinois central railroad company offers for sale over 1,500,000 acres selected farming and wood lands, in tracts of forty acres and upwards, to suit purchasers, on long credits and at low rates of interest, situated on each side of their railroad, extending all the way from the extreme north to the south of the state of Illinois
Year: 1857 (1850s)
Authors: Illinois Central Railroad Company
Subjects: Railroad land grants
Publisher: Chicago, Illinois central rail road office
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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% LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 0 016 090 205 n *

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I; hari/T^,

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Image from page 696 of “Our young folks [serial]” (1865)
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Identifier: ouryoungfolksser4112trow
Title: Our young folks [serial]
Year: 1865 (1860s)
Authors: Trowbridge, J. T. (John Townsend), 1827-1916 Hamilton, Gail, 1833-1896 Larcom, Lucy, 1824-1893
Subjects:
Publisher: [Boston : Ticknor and Fields]
Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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g into water cooler than it-self, it makes the thundering noise of which I spoke. But before it is quitecooled, it pushes and presses for more room, as usual. You know howstrong steam is. It pushes so hard, that it lifts the water that could not quiteboil up higher, where the air does not press so heavily. The steam atomsare as strong as the new air atoms, and they burst out; and the water belowhas a lighter weight to lift. More steam comes in at the bottom of the tube,and lifts the water still higher, where the air is lighter yet, till the steamgrows so strong that it throws the water above it high in the air. See !here goes our little Geyser, and sends the water almost to the ceiling. Is itclear, Mr. Traveller ? Clear as mud, growled the Traveller. It is a beautiful experiment, said the Lord High Fiddlestick, looking as •] Third Lecture on Heat. 663 pink as his slippers with pleasure ; but the credit of it belongs to our wis-est man. We should never have found it out, but for him.

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If he finds out anything like that again, I will have him hung, growledthe King ; that is, if I am obliged to hear about it. Before concluding, said my Lord High Fiddlestick, I have somethingmore to tell you about Heat. When air is heated, it grows larger and lighter.It gets more motion, and it rises. In this way, Heat makes the winds. Thesuns rays strike on the earth, and heat it. The air just above the earth isheated, and, as I have said, it rises. You know that the earth is round, andthat it turns from west to east. Your Majesty remembers, also, that the mid-dle of the earth is called the Tropics ; for when we proposed to your Majestyto settle there, your Majesty answered, that you liked the bananas andoranges, but you objected to the lions and tarantulas. On this happy coun-try of the tarantulas the sun shines straight down. Naturally there theearth and the air are most heated. Our earth is turning around, like a wheel,from west to east, and we keep up a good rate of speed. Where

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Image from page 230 of “The Southern States” (1893)
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Identifier: southernstates1893balt
Title: The Southern States
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Agriculture Industries
Publisher: Baltimore, Manufacturers’ Record Pub. Co
Contributing Library: State Library of North Carolina, Government & Heritage Library
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation

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GREENBRIER WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS IN 1893. tion, both of which he drank up. Withhis means and respectabihty he also losthis good name, literally. From thesonorous William Montague (accent onthe g2ie) it got to be Will Montage,then Bill Tage (pronounce g hard)—and by the time he arrived at the condi-tion of complete vagabondism nothing-was left of his title but Bill Taggs. Mr. Montague, Im glad to see you.Mr. Montague ? Itvasnt Mr. Mon-tague when we used to sit on the samebench at school. I have never foreotten our early friendship, old boy ; how weused to catch flies together and drownkittens. Ah ! those were rare times !and William sighed as if the reminis-cence was too much for him. Ah, Porte! we will never see suchdays again. To think of the windowsweve broken, the bird-nests weverobbed, the hens eggs weve sucked.And then the splendid lies we usedto tell the school-master. You couldbeat us all at that, Porte ; we all knockedunder to you. Many a whopper Pve

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COTTAGES AT GREENBRIER WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS. 238 PIC TURKSO UE VIR GIN!A. borrowed from you to get myself out ofa scrape. My friend, said Crayon with dignity,since I left school I have been about inthe world a great deal, and consequentlyhave but a faint recollection of thematters to which you allude. At any rate youll condescend totake a drink with an old acquaintance. Whos to pay ? said Boniface, look-ing significantly at Mr. Crayon, whoslipped a quarter eagle into his friendshand with delicate adroitness. Id like to know, said Bill, address-ing the landlord with an air of offendeddignity, why do you put that question tome when I ask a gentleman to drink ?Set down your best. Here Mr. Mon-tague flipped his coin on the table withthe air of a millionaire. And when Billasked for the change the landlorddecided to credit it on Bills bill, whorewarded Crayons generosity by pre-tending that Crayon had owed him asmall balance, since, as you will recollectthe night of the big spree, when you

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Image from page 334 of “China’s open door; a sketch of Chinese life and history” (1900)
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Identifier: chinasopendoorsk00wild
Title: China’s open door; a sketch of Chinese life and history
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors: Wildman, Rounsevelle, 1864-1901
Subjects:
Publisher: Boston, Lothrop Publishing Company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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ld will take off theirhats reverently in the plain hall, eighty-four feetlong, with a roof supported by pillars forty feethigh, covering the single room, which is old andunkempt, cheerless, unornamented, but redolentwith the savor of intellectual immortality. Thegreat teacher struck the bottom rock underlyingall human creeds. Four hundred years beforeChrist he gave to the world the golden rule : Doye not unto others what ye would not they shoulddo unto you. At a missionary society meetingat Peking, I heard the members argue for severalhours which was the better rule, this or the wordsof Christ: Do ye unto others what ye wouldthey should do unto you; and to the credit ofthese worlds representatives of religious thought,be it said that they voted by a large majority thatthere was no difference in the phrases. The simplicity of the temple increases ourrespect for the great agnostic who pretendednot to tell of the mysteries of the furture lifebecause he said, We do not know this life, how

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THE EXAMINATION HALL. 2<J5 can we know the other ? The dust of ages onthe floor, the ceiling, and the tablets do notobscure the fame of the founder of Chinese ethics,the model philosopher, the moralist, whose teach-ing was so pure that the Christian is driven to thewild assertion that his followers learned the goldenrule after Christ had uttered it, and then incorpo-rated it into his writings. Suppose they did.The offense pardons itself, for never did immortalphrase find a more appropriate setting than didthis word talisman of humanity in the utterancesof him who stands to-day the moral monitor of hisrace. Well might Confucius have said, Homosum et nihil humanum me alienum puto. I ama man, and nothing that is human is indifferent tome. The Examination Hall teaches profoundlessons to the student of history. Here everythird year come the graduates of the provincialexaminations to contest for the degrees whichplace their winners on the lowest round of theladder of official place. The

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Image from page 36 of “The Oölogist for the student of birds, their nests and eggs” (1886)
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Identifier: ologistfors1214189597latt
Title: The Oölogist for the student of birds, their nests and eggs
Year: 1886 (1880s)
Authors: Lattin, Frank H
Subjects: Birds Birds
Publisher: Albion, N.Y. : Frank H. Lattin
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

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date have been credited on our booksbut not on the wrapper. To Whom it may Concern: Notice is hereby given that the partncrship formerly existingbetweenFrankH. Lattin and Walter F. Webb underthe firm name of F. H. Lattin & Co..was dissolved on the 31st day of July,A. D., 1894, by mutual consent. Frank H. Lattin.Walter F. Webb.Your letters mustnevery& address-ed to F. H. Lat-tin & Co., but to either Frank H.Lattin or Walter F. Webb, whichever you.may wish to receive the same.All matters pertaining to the Oologisttnust be addressed Lattin. Byheeding this pointer you may saveyourself and the party you may wishyour letter to reach^ both delay andpossible unpleasantness. %W Agents to sell our new book, Dictionary of United States History, by Prof. J.Franklin Jameson. Needed by every teacher,pupil and family; indorsed by press and public.Agents selling fifty books per week. Success-ful agents will be made general aarents. Binpay. PURITAN PUBLISHING CO, Boston.Mass. Important; ^

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VOL. XII. NO. 2. ALBION, N. Y., FEB., 1895. Whole No. 112 Wants, Exchanges, and For Sales. Brief special announcements, Wants, Exchanges For Sales, inserted in tWs departmentror 5UC per 35 words. Notices over 35 words, charged at the rate ol one cent per each additionalword. No notice Inserted for less than goc. Terms, cash with order. Dealers can use these columns at Regular AdvmUsing rates only Strictly First-class specimens will be accepted In payment at one-half list rates. Exchange cards and Coupons (subscription) will be accepted for Wants and Exchanges onlyand according to conditions stated thereon. EXCHANGE.—Lattins strapped climbers,few first class single eggs and Indian relics.Want Hornadays Taxidermy, eggs in sets andDavies Key. All letters answered. E. S.GRAFTON, Plattsburg, Clinton Co., Mo. SPLENDID Opportunity.—The followingfinely mounted birds for only .00 or best offerIn coins. Scarlet Tanager. Great Crested Fly-catcher. Redstart. Black and White Creeper.Lincolns

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Image from page 102 of “All about California, and the inducements to settle their ..” (1870)
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Identifier: allaboutcaliforn01cali
Title: All about California, and the inducements to settle their ..
Year: 1870 (1870s)
Authors: California Immigrant Union Hittell, John S. (John Shertzer), 1825-1901
Subjects: Pacific railroads
Publisher: San Francisco, The California immigrant union
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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ising some of the richest soil inthe great San Joaquin Valley. This land will be sold in quantity from half asection upwards, at VERY MODERATE RATES, and on a liberal credit. Maps and Plans can be obtained at his ofiice, as above. are situated in the San Joaquin Valley, and the facilities now offered forobtaining A SMALL FARM, Will never again be equaled. For full particulars concerning the soil, climate,products, etc., of the San Joaquin Valley, see pages 17, 18, 46 and 50. -^ 500,000 ^cres Fanning Lands. JOHN T. LITTLE, Real Estate Agent, OFFICE, NO. 1 STEVENSONS BUILDING, Offers for Sale on Liberal Terms, Cxnproved Farzns, Stock Ilanch.es and ^ Grain Ziands, IN THE Sacramento, Napa and San JoaquinVALLEYS, I and in the Northern and Southern Counties of the State, at prices rangingfrom .00 per acr», upwards. Strangers calline at his office will be furnished with Maos of _the State, and _ ^ FREE OF CHARGE. I Tremont House, J^CZSOIT STRSET, mmtm^^®^w ^affl P^mi lW)®$ SAN FBMCISGO.

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The undersigned begs to inform the Public that he has openr ■, the above-named House, The Furniture is entirely new. The Sleeping Apartments havebeen furnished with the bfest Patent Spring Beds and Hair Mattresses. The Rooms are all lighted, large, and the best ventilated in the city. PRICES TO SUIT TSE TIMES. The .TABLE will be supplied with the BEST the MARKET AFFORDS,making this the cheapest Hotel in the city. Coach Free to the Hotel. Boardand Lodging from f5.00 to .00 per JVeek. The Coach will convey Passengers to any part of the City, for 50 cts. P. C^SSEELY, Proprietor, LATE PROPRIETOR OF MANHATTAN HOUSE. CHICAGO, ROCK ISLAND AND ®lfi® B^I1p#^## The Great Central Iowa Short Line Overland Route, via Chicago, Rock Island, Des Moines and Omaha. B^-SHORTEST, QUICKEST AND BEST ROUTE, BETWEEN THE ATLANTIC AND THE PACIFIC. Carrying the THEOTJGH OYERLAND LETTER MAIL. THROUGH TICKETS to the Western Territories and California, can be obtained at Companysoffices at NEW YORK, 257 Bro

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Image from page 145 of “Historical and biographical design of Cherry Creek, Chautauqua County, nyc : with views of company locations and residences, with sketches of prominent citizens of varied occupations and vocations, previous and current”
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Identifier: historicalbiogra00shul
Title: Historic and biographical design of Cherry Creek, Chautauqua County, New York : with views of company locations and residences, along with sketches of prominent residents of varied careers and vocations, last and present
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors: Shults, Charles J ed
Subjects:
Publisher: [Buffalo, G. M. Hausauer, printer]
Adding Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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d andare supjdied during period. A full distinct drugs and chemicals are herecarried, in addition everything when you look at the type of druggists sundries, bathroom articles, patentmedicines, etc. The laborat(irv is in direction of ]Ir. A. M.French, a registered ])harmacist, which fills sales and dispenses medicineswith unusual tact, reliability and skill. This organization does a splendid Ijusiness and it is justly regarded asone of the greatest equipped and most modem and up-to-date pharmacies in thissection. It might be a credit to anv citv. SUCCESSFUL AGRICULTURALISTS. ^111] dairy liiisines8 in conncctidn witli fariiiinu- luis assuiiUd nianiindth|ii-ii|i(ii-tiiins in Aest(nn nyc, ami riicrrv Creek in jiarticularlias l)ee(_)nie noted for the dairy |)roduets. Among the leadinir pro-ducers with this class in this city is Jerome B. Hhattnck, which wasIxirn right here ilay 27. lx4. His grandfather, Pliny Hhattuek, ended up being oneof 1st stttler regarding the t<iwn. Mr. Shattuck ended up being hroULcht uji nn the farm, 4 ^

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JEROME B. SHATTUCK. and, like a number of our countrys hest guys, had been educated when you look at the commonschools. As he attained manhood he carried on to accomplish farm work, and isnow the ownt-r of 17 acres (]f Really ini|ii(iveil laud, located ahout two mileswest of town, and upon it he jjasturos a tine herd of (Hello cows, from themilk that he tends to make and jirepare for market a su]ierior (luality of hutter.At the orlds Fair in the liutter exliiliit their liutter scored !IS iioints off

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Image from web page 209 of “Savitar” (1922)
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Identifier: savitar28univ
Title: Savitar
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: University of Missouri University of Missouri–Columbia
Topics: University of Missouri University of Missouri–Columbia College yearbooks Universities and colleges
Publisher: Columbia, Mo. : University of Missouri
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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A C TI VI T I E S xr i;aiiiiiii:::,!:,:,,:,,,i,,;iiiiiiiiit

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VV. H. Coleman Catherine M. Ware John Arnett Hi omecoming y%LTHOUGH the rousing big size meeting the evening before actually started/~y things, it absolutely was maybe not until ten A. M. on November twelfth that MizzousHomecoming was formally produced. At that time a normal Tiger Townparade moved forward, led by the distinguished visitors together with R. O. T. C.cadets and filled with stunts, smart a few ideas and gorgeous floats. After the parade the site the brand-new Memorial building had been dedicatedwith addresses by our visitors. Almost eight thousand saw the game using the Sooners that mid-day inwhich the Tigers scored a decisive success, 24—-14, and tasted the sweets ofrevenge. The inescapable shirttail parade occurred that night. Much credit is due the exec committee, consists of Bill Coleman,Billy Ware and John Arnett, which worked out every detail, from elec-trically lighted T-I-G-E-R sign on the columns to the tiger paths from the pathways.

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Image from page 370 of “Raleigh Christian Advocate: organ of the North Carolina Conference, M.E. Church, South” (1870)
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Identifier: raleighchrist1901meth
Title: Raleigh Christian Advocate: organ of the North Carolina Conference, M.E. Church, South
Year: 1870 (1870s)
Authors: Methodist Episcopal Church, South. North Carolina Conference
Subjects: Methodist Episcopal Church, South. North Carolina Conference Methodist Church
Publisher: Raleigh : [s.n.]
Contributing Library: Duke Divinity School Library, Duke University
Digitizing Sponsor: Institute of Museum and Library Services, under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act, administered by the State Library of North Carolina. Grant issued to Duke University for the Religion in North Carolina project.

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We want this ad inclosed .n writing us We are Dr. I. Sii.i:<s Daniew. Richmond, Va Write a p j.tal t, dsy For B ok Free. GOODoPOSITIONS. You may, without payiDg to the college a cent fortuition, until conrsc is completed and position secured,attend one of Draughns Practical Business Colleges,Nashville, St. Louis, AUanta, tf ontgomery, Uttle Rock,Shreveport, Fort Worth and Galveston. Send for caU-logue; H will ezpUin all. Address: Credit Depart*meat, Draughas College. at dthcr of above places. HICKS CAPUDINE CURES COLD IN HEAD. LaGRIPPE PAINS, HEAD-ACHES, NEURALGIA, FEVERISHNESS AND ACHK8ARISING FROM MALARIOUS CONDITIONS. i^No bad effects whatever. 15, 25, and 50 cents per bottl«at Dmgvtorea. ^■■■^P^pw^r^F^F^^*^—8>—^^-^–lP~^^–>y.~.^ ZACHA^Y A ZACHARY, ArtisticWood Mantels, TIlM, GcatM and Fii«place Trimmings, all ki>^Boilden Supplies. Contractors and Builders^ 106 West lUrtin [Street,RAI^EIOH, N. C:Pho]M|38a ^ , Write lor CstsW*

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aI V riter 100, ichineoard. |y and [o well pleasemachines. ■IGrH, iN. ( U. 1901. Bladderany per->n curedles and I wd to say^rESTIONfeved me.rid. [AFT, imijohns.Mnts and fty. er. I90I. ipany, VIINERALidity of thesatisfactory )t prepared^tioned, yet complete.le. I allow knocks ittroni aboveice. >outh.rates to all N. C. [RISTIAN am t to this lie it lru{|:isti, N C.INT.

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Image from page 27 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)
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Identifier: streetrailwayj261905newy
Title: The Street railway journal
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation
Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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nd glass. The battery was installed by theElectric Storage Battery Company. At Petaluma an additional current is supplied to the railwayby the California Gas & Electric Corporation from a motor-generator set. This set consists of a 440-hp Stanley syn-chronous motor, driving a 350-kw Bullock generator at 360r.p.m. The motor connections at Petaluma are 4000 volts star,while those at Sebastopol are 2300 volts delta. The passenger service of the Petaluma & Santa Rosa Rail- 14 STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. [Vol. XXVI. No. i. way is handled by ten 45-ft. semi-convertible cars, manufac-tured by the American Car Company, of St. Louis, and W. H.Holman & Company, of San Francisco. These cars are ableto maintain a speed of 35 m.p.h. on the level, and contain bag-gage and smoking compartments. Each is equipped with fourGeneral Electric 70-motors and two 28-A controllers. West-inghouse straight air-brakes are installed with Nichols-Lin-tern pneumatic sanding devices. Wagenhals arc headlights

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north from Forestville through the Dry Creek Valley to Healds-burg and other prosperous towns on the Russian River. Abranch westward through Sonoma County, with the possibilityof eventually reaching the ocean, is also talked of. The present officers of the Petaluma & Santa Rosa RailwayCompany are: President, John A. McNear, of Petaluma; vice-president, W. F. Kelly, of Oakland; secretary, Thos. Archer;treasurer, Burke Corbett; general manager, E. E. Downs. Much credit for the successful constructionis due to Alfred D. Bowen, who also super-vised the early operation of the road. FIELDS VERSUS ARMATURES NEARESTTROLLEY BY JOSEPH ANDREWS STANDARD PASSENGER CAR ON THE PETALUMA & SANTA ROSA RAILWAY w ith roller-canvas screens are used, and all cars have standardpilots. A half-hour passenger service is operated at present,the cars being despatched by telephone with duplicate trainorders. The passenger rate charged is 2 cents a mile, with aminimum of 5 cents. The companys freight servi

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Image from page 167 of “Bank rate and the money market in England, France, Germany, Holland, and Belgium, 1844-1900;” (1903)
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Identifier: bankratemoneymar00palgrich
Title: Bank rate and the money market in England, France, Germany, Holland, and Belgium, 1844-1900;
Year: 1903 (1900s)
Authors: Palgrave, Robert Harry Inglis, Sir, 1827-1919
Subjects: Bank of England Interest Banks and banking
Publisher: London, J. Murray
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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— nj 1 I ^ ^ ^ BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 167 By W. L. Pereira, Architect

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tr^ O M E exliibitors1^^ still regard theservices of anarchitect as a luxury.Ive talked to many ofthem who are quitecertain that architectsfees must be added totheir estimated cost—and if they do use anarcliitect, they finallysettle on the lowest feethey can find. Ivenever seen a really progressive or credit-able piece of work result from the com-bination. When an aixhitect undertakes a build-ing commission such as a department store,residence, office building—in fact almostany structm-e Taut a theatre building—hecan usually expect to find the whole jobon his shoulders. If its good he gets thecredit^-if its bad he gets what he de-serves. At any rate, he is hired for what heknows, and generally speaking, the owneris too busy with his own tasks to becomean architect. The owner will usually findtime to make decisions, pay his bills andverify the fact that the arcliitect warrantshis continued confidence. But for a great deal of theatre building,the conditions are somewhat reversed.

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