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Image from page 293 of “Annual report of the Public Service Commission, and the … annual report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners” (1914)

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Image from page 293 of “Annual report of the Public Service Commission, and the … annual report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners” (1914)
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Identifier: annualreportofpu19162mass
Title: Annual report of the Public Service Commission, and the … annual report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Massachusetts. Public Service Commission Massachusetts. Board of Railroad Commissioners. Annual report
Subjects: Massachusetts. Public Service Commission Public utilities
Publisher: Boston : Wright & Potter Printing Co.
Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

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Total Taxes paid during Year and charged Directly or Indirectly to Income. Amount of Taxes in Litigation at Close of Year. Nantucket Railroad Company, 41 41 Miscellaneous Items in Profit and Loss Account for the Year. Item. Credits. Allowance on bills payable, 8 90 Road operated at Close of Year. Name of Road or Track. Termini between which Roadnamed extends. Miles ofRoad. AJl Other Main Tracks. Total. Nantucket R.R. Co., . Nantucket to Siasconset, . 9.12 .15 9.27 Miscellaneous Characteristics of Road.Gage of Track and Weight of Rail. Gage of Track. Weight of Rail per Yard (Pounds). Miles ofMain Track. Three feet 40 9.12 Grade Crossings. Description. With Streets, Avenues and Highways. Protected by flagmen alone, part time only, Unprotected, 3 10 Total 13 290 RAILROAD RETURNS. [Jan. Classification of Respondents Locomotive and Car Equipment.Equipment owned or leased in Service of the Respondent. Class of Equipment. Unitsavailable for Service at Close of Year (fully owned).

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Steam locomotives, ….. Freight-Train Cabs.Flat cars, Passenger-Train Cars. Coaches, Combination passenger cars, All classes of passenger-train cars. Ties laid in Replacement and in Bettebment. Cross Tibs. Switch and BridgeTies. Kind of Ties. TotalNumberof Tiesapplied. Average Cost per Tie at Dis-tributing Point. Numberof Feet(BoardMeasure)applied. AverageCost per MFeet (BoardMeasure) at Dis-tributing Point. Amount charged to Operating Expenses. Untreated chestnut, . 3,445

Image from page 171 of “REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, ONTARIO, 1909” (1910)
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Identifier: reportofminister1909onta
Title: REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, ONTARIO, 1909
Year: 1910 (1910s)
Authors: Ontario. Dept. of Education Ontario. Ministry of Education ONTARIO. DEPT. OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
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Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Guelph, University of Windsor, York University and University of Toronto Libraries

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rom the Brantford Courier, June 15th, 1909.) The music hall of the Ontario Institution for the Blind was filled to over-flowing last evening, the occasion being the closing concert of the session, and not-withstanding the length of the programme standing room in the aisles and adjacentcorridors was at a premium until the end of the last number. Principal Gardinerexplained that, as an ample synopsis of the story of Joan of Arc would be foundon the ink-print and point-print programmes, no verbal explanations were required,hence it was possible to begin the work of the evening promptly. Charles Duff,who lives at Banda, but is now very well known in Brantford musical circles,opened the programme with Rheinbergers Pastorale Sonata on the organ andafterwards played Wieniawskis Valse on the piano, besides taking part withLouise Deschenes in Dvoraks Duo, Slavonic Dances. Miss Deschenes also gavean organ number, Guilmants Elevation, and Thomas Kennedy played Liszts 130 THE REPORT OF THE No. 16

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–, 3 o 1909 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION. 137 Liebestraum No. 3 on the piano. Richard Henderson sang Piccolominis Orapro Nobis, and the closing number of the first part of the programme wasTschaikowskys March e MiJitaire on two pianos by dean Chatelain, HaroldElnor, Charles McBride and Clifford Patterson. At the request of the Principal, Dr. Torrington of the Toronto College ofMusic, presented diplomas to Louise Deschenes for piano and to Thomas Kennedyfor piano and vocal music, complimenting the graduates on the accuracy of theirwork, which, he said, reflected credit upon themselves and their teachers. W. S.Brewster, M.P.P., in a pleasant speech, presented the College testimonials to LouiseDeschenes (third year piano, first class honours), Louise Deschenes (first year-organ, first class honours), Eva Johnson (first year theory, honours), EthelMcQuade (second year piano, first class honours), Ethel McQuade (first year theory,first class honours) ; and Rev. Mr. Wright, of St. Judes, with a

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39 20,670 00 Sl,349 64 Statistics of Rail Line Operations. Item. Average mileage of road operated (miles), Tbain-Miles.Passenger, . . . . Locomotive-Miles.Passenger, principal, ………. Car-Miles.Passenger train, passenger, ……… Freight Service.Tons, revenue freight, ………. Ton-miles, revenue freight, ……… Passenger Service.Passengers carried, revenue, ……… Passenger-miles, revenue, ……… Revenues and Expenses.Freight revenue, ……….. Passenger revenue, Passenger service train re

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Image from web page 281 of “Annual report for the public-service Commission, as well as the … yearly report for the Board of Railroad Commissioners” (1914)

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Image from page 281 of “Annual report regarding the public-service Commission, as well as the … annual report regarding the Board of Railroad Commissioners” (1914)
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Identifier: annualreportofpu19172mass
Title: Yearly report associated with the Public Service Commission, additionally the … annual report associated with Board of Railroad Commissioners
12 Months: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Massachusetts. Public Service Commission Massachusetts. Board of Railroad Commissioners. Yearly report
Subjects: Massachusetts. Public-service Commission Public resources
Publisher: Boston : Wright & Potter Printing Co.
Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Associate Libraries

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,596 64 8103 50 ,493 14 Capital Inventory. Par Value ofAmountauthor-ized. ParValue of TotalAmountactuallyissued to Closeof Year. ParValue ofAmountactuallyoutstand-ing atCloseof 12 Months. Shares in fact released Just Before Provide Year. Cl.ss op Inventory andAuthorization. ParValue. Cash re-ceived asConsider-ation forIssue. Typical stock: authorizationsclosed before present year. Common stock: open author-ization of Jan. 12, 1869, boardof administrators. 0,00090,000 0,000 8260,000 0,000 0,000 TOT.VL 0,000 0,000 0,000 0,000 0,000 278 EAILEOAD t^TTRXS. [Jan- vjs i = 1 t: 5 = 1- S ^ – – = :^ = -r «& ^ = – ^ ^ ^ ^3 — ~ – * -^ ^ ^ — > >. r w = ■ s — T c – =: i ^^ m- : c. i — – = i-rl 5- — T— s . ^ —— — . »; C _ j .—~ – s 1 ■ – s f X •~^ = -r c £! – z ^r = -i – — < *^ ^ -= 5 – — i ■< _ r . i = Z. ^ 1. — Z : 5, ■< z _ J – f ) i _i – a r 3 a ! 1 5 . Z roentgen 9- S J

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— S s *^ £ s tt we we 1918.] HOLYOKE & ^^TSTFIELD. 279 Pboftt axd Loss Accor:sT. Item. Debi-rs. Credits. Credit stability at beginniiig of year, p. 277, .Credit stability transferred from income, p. 279,Credit balance carried to stabilize sheet, . TaTjx, 13,290 59,2y0 55 ,680 05610 .54 S3,290 59 DlTrDE>rDS DECILAP.ED DTErNG THE i EAE. NAilE OF SeCUBITTOX -STHICH DlVrDE>.D Speed Per CentiHeguIar). Par Val-aeof Amounton -whichDi-vidend wasdeclared. Distribu-tion ofcharge earnings). Dais. •WAS DECT.ARKD. Declared. Payable. Inventory, ….Stock, …. Stock Stock, …. Total, 1 3H3M3H3H 0,000260,000260,000260,000 59,1009,1009,1009,100 536,400 Mar. 9, 1916June 7, 1916Sept. 8, 1916Dee. 8, 1916 ilar. 9, 1916June 7, 1916Sept. S, 1916Dec. 8, 1916 Note. — No obligation was incurred because of any di^vidend announced during year.IxcoME Acco■^^T for Yeap.. Item. Amotuit j s-i-i relevant to I Preceding the 1 ear. Year (Increase). XoXOPEBArrNG IxcoiiE.Income from rent of roadway

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Image obtained from page 424 of ‘the brand new World in 1859. Being the usa and Canada, illustrated and explained, etc. [With illustrations.]’
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Title: "The New World in 1859. Becoming america and Canada, illustrated and described, etc. [With illustrations.]", "Appendix. Information, Travels and Topography"
Author: Usa
Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 10408.f.23."
Webpage: 424
Host to Publishing: London; New York printed
Date of Publishing: 1859
Publisher: H. Bailliere
Issuance: monographic
Identifier: 003734248

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Image from page 36 of “American professional and railroad diary” (1893)

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Image from web page 36 of “United states engineer and railroad log” (1893)
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Identifier: americanengineer81newy
Title: US engineer and railway journal
12 Months: 1893 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Railroad manufacturing Engineering Railroads Railroad cars
Publisher: New York : M.N. Forney
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Users and Sloan Foundation

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f fix would ren-der it better to scrap it. The cost of steel vehicle fixes is, overall, really small bycomparison, when it’s taken into consideration that compara-tive costs of repairs of the two sorts as written by railways are,as a rule, manifestly unfair. The upkeep reportsfor publication are usually taken only for vehicles that havebeen repaired. Winn it really is a wood automobile this implies, on anaverage, minor repairs. Exactly what associated with the timber automobiles destroyed?you can find large number of such each month. Should not thecost of renewals, less a scrap credit, be included with the woodcar upkeep sheet to arrive at an equitable basis for com-parison aided by the steel cars? This might toss a great bal-ance on the metal automobile side of the debate, and would bringforth the argument that lots of of lumber vehicles therefore destroyedwere old and of an obsolete type. Although this does work, however theold car features a money worth; an automobile is an automobile in the records, andthe failure for the old timber automobiles acts simply to improve the

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ILLUSTRATION OF BADLY WRECKED STEEL FRE1I III CAB. to cars. Regarding the normal roadway there isn’t enough demand for worth of the current steel car that will not disintegrate,repair components to warrant the cost of setting up a unique the typical cost of fixing steel vehicles differs dramatically shop; this problem makes it required to look to the vehicle using the kind, and as a bigger amount of 100,000 pounds. ability builder for material, may it be of architectural or pressed metal hoppers have now been built than any various other class, prices of forms. their fix is more interesting. The following is accurate documentation pushed and architectural people, or eg end and cor- of normal costs of certain types of fix to the type: ncr posts, stakes, flange angles and plates, can be cut off by price of repairing 100,000 lbs. capacity metallic hoppers. hand and heated in a gas or Oil fire, and Straightened on a single end having part and end sills, draft sills and place braces huge flat work surface dish or anvil with ordin

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Image from page 227 of “A narrative of voyages and commercial businesses” (1850)
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Identifier: narrativeofvoyag00clev
Title: A narrative of voyages and commercial enterprises
Year: 1850 (1850s)
Authors: Cleveland, Richard J. (Richard Jeffry), 1773-1860
Topics: Voyages and travels Commerce
Publisher: Boston, C. H. Peirce
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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t at north park, hence his solutions wereduly appreciated. Their practices were costly, and, notwithstanding DEATH Ot GEOEGE. 223 many years he had been on constant pay and high earnings with me, Inever could convince him to lay by any thing. He accompanied mefrom China to Boston in alarm,, stayed with me as a domesticabout a-year after, and died at Roxbury, and it is buried in theRoxbury cemetery. CHAPTER XVIII. Reason for again Voyaging —Destination—Suspicion for the Quakers —Sail fromNew York—A Gale — Disnaasted — reach Kio Janeiro — The browse — AUowedForty-five times to correct —Eig the Vessel as a Brig — Obstacles to Changing theVoyage—Obviated—Dispose regarding the Cargo—Buy a Ship and Cargo of Beef—Despatch the Aspasia because of the Mate— visit St. Catharines into the Ship — Descrip-tion—Sail for Havana — Boarded twice—Cochranes Fleet—Boarding Officer•—A Contrast to their Commander — Ordered for Tortola—done ownership of bythe Cerbenis Frigate.

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^^f^1BM^(3, in my own enterprises, a character ofadventure united thereupon of purchase, hadbeen the motive of action ; but henceforth thelatter would be to work alone. The voyage within the Lelia Byrd, underneath the exclu-sive course of Mr. Shaler, proved an extremely unfor-tunate one. Owing to some informality in theprotest, we did not recuperate any thing from theunderwriters. The attempt made in directionof Mr. Hudson to access our affairs, by a return tothe coastline of California thereupon the main cargowhich stayed unsold, in slightly vessel which hadbeen built in the area, along with already been consumed change forthe Lelia Byrd, was unsuccessful. The large quantity cred-ited to the missionaries of Ca, to their quick notes,was a total reduction. Just four for the twenty priests regarding the variousmissions scattered over the shore, to whom we’d provided credit,were adequately honest to get their records. The quantity whichwe had put into cost of your buddy Rouissillon, is accountedfor by him

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Image from page 468 of “Report regarding the Auditor General to the House of Commons, reports the, C to J, L, M, N (for the financial year ended 31 March 1909)” (1910)
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Title: Report associated with the auditor-general towards the House of Commons, states A, C to J, L, M, N (the financial year ended 31 March 1909)
Year: 1910 (1910s)
Authors: Canada. Workplace for the Auditor General
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Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Guelph, University of Windsor, York University and University of Toronto Libraries

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ds at credit Bacon, 500 pound. at 13ic . Balance, March 31, 1909 $ cts. 1,983 60 2,350 009,836 085,956 14 20,125 82 5 33 9 8467 5095 43 178 10 $ cts. 9 8420,115 98 20,125 82 89 3088 80 178 10 188.—Kakawishtahaws Band, Sask. Capital. 11 971 98 control Fund, portion on selections, 10 p.c. on ,971.98 1,197 209,900 00 874 78 Balance March 31, 1909 11,971 98 11,971 98 Interest.Balance April 1, 1908, .13; interest, 3 p.c. on .13, .11 38 24 Camp permit ; portion on selections, 6 p.c. on 0 60 7 30 40 34 10 00 Balance March 31, 1909 48 24 48 24 189.—Lac la Ronge Band, Sask. Balance, April 1, 1908, 9.85; interest, 3 p.c. on 9.85, .10 Covers, 20 pr., ; cod outlines. 30, .70; resources and hardware, .85. .Gilling twine, 50 lb., .50; holland twine, 490 hanks, 9.12, freighting .72 Balance, March 31, 1909 108 55 254 34 18 06 380 95 380 95 380 95 192.—Bird Tail Sioux, Man. Debit stability, April 1, 1908 Refunded from appropriation, to shut account.

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0 16 1—138 AUDITOR GENERALS REPORT, 1908-1909 9-10 EDWARD VII.. A. 1910 199.—Sackemays Band. Sask. Dr. Cr. Capital. Balance, April 1, 1908 Transfer of number of credit of Little Bones Band, account 140..Transfer to interest account of great interest moneys in above account.Balance, March 31, 1909 Interest. Interest 3 p.c. on .93 Interest transferred from minimal Bones Band, account 140.. Hay licenses, ; lease of camp grounds, Transfer of great interest moneys at credit of money control Fund, percentage on selections, 6 p.c. on Cleaner and bagger, ; fixes to implements, .20 Balance, March 31, 1909 $ cts. 296 409 22 305 62 4 26 50 20 322 11 376 57 $ cts. 82 93222 69 305 62 2 49 6 68 71 00 296 40 376 57 200.—Bella Coola Band, B.C. Balance, April 1, 1908, 7.33; interest, 3 p.c. on 7.33, .42. P. Jacobsen, lease of floor, 12 m. to Feb. 1, 1909 Management Fund, percentage on selections, 6|p.c. on Balance, March 31, 1909 3 00816 75 819 75 769 7550 00 819 75 20

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Image from page 299 of “The Pacific tourist : Williams’ illustrated trans-continental guide of travel, from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean : containing full descriptions of railroad routes across the continent, all pleasure resorts and places of most n

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Image from page 299 of “The Pacific tourist : Williams’ illustrated trans-continental guide of travel, from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean : containing full descriptions of railroad routes across the continent, all pleasure resorts and places of most n
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Identifier: pacifictouristwi00will
Title: The Pacific tourist : Williams’ illustrated trans-continental guide of travel, from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean : containing full descriptions of railroad routes across the continent, all pleasure resorts and places of most noted scenery in the far West, also of all cities, towns, villages, U.S. Forts, springs, lakes, mountains, routes of summer travel, best localities for hunting, fishing, sporting, and enjoyment, with all needful information for the pleasure traveler, miner, settler, or business man : a complete traveler’s guide of the Union and Central Pacific Railroads and all points of business or pleasure travel to California, Colorado, Nebraska, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada, Montana, the mines and mining of the territories, the lands of the Pacific Coast, the wonders of the Rocky Mountains, the scenery of the Sierra Nevadas, the Colorado mountains, the big trees, the geysers, the Yosemite, and the Yellowstone
Year: 1877 (1870s)
Authors: Williams, Henry T
Subjects: Union Pacific Railroad Company Central Pacific Railroad Company
Publisher: New York : H.T. Williams
Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

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ssouri.—The Bullion State, the Puke State, Pukes.Hannibal.—The Bluff City. St. Louis.—The Mound City. Nebraska.—The Bug Eaters. Nevada.—Sage Hens. Oregon.—Web Feet, Hard Cases. Texas.—The Lone Star State, Beet Heads. PRONUNCIA Diego,—dee-ay -go.Suinnn,—soo-ee-soon.Alameda,—ah-lah-may-da.Sierra,—see-er-ra.Nevada,—nay-vah-dah.Mateo,—mah-tay-o.Monterey,—mon-ta-ray-ee.Luis Obispo,—loo-ess o-bees po.Vale]o,—val-yay-ho.Vallecito,—val yay-thee-to.Tamalpais,—tah-mal-pice.~Nietos,—nee-ay-tos.Cahuilla,—calxoo-eel-ya.Hueneme,— way-nay-way.Napa,— nah-pah.Jose,—ho-say. riON OF NAMES. Jesus Maria,—hay-eoos- mahree-ah.Tita,—poo-tah.Tejon,—tah-ho7ie.Farallones,—fa h-rahl-yo- nes.GaX>re,—gah-bree-ale.Rafael,—rahfah-ale.Miguel,—mee- gale.Pajaro,—pa/j-Aa/t-ro.Coyote ,—co-yotay.Pocheco,—poh-chay-co.Dos Pueblos,—dohs-pway- bios.Folrome,—;fulsome.Yosemite.—yo-sem-i-te.San Rafael,—san rah-flll.Tehama,—te-hay-ma. BICtt f AfWfl

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OJST TI-5IE3 X-iTUNTIrZI OF THE Located in the GREAT CENTRAL BELT of POPU-LATION, COMMERCE and WEALTH, andadjoining the WORLDS HIGHWAYfrom OCEAN TO OCEAN. 4S„©@@,©0© ACR 3.000,000 Acres in Central andEastern Nebraska, in the Platte Valley, now for sale ! We invite the attention of all parties seekinga HOME, to the LANDS offered for sale hy this Company. The Vast Quantity of Land from which to select, ena-bles every one to secure such a location as he desires, suita-ble to any bianch of farming or stock raising. The Prices are Extremely Low. The amount of landowned by the Company is so large that they are determinedto sell at the cheapest possible rates, ranging from .50 to•S8.00 per acre. The Terms of Payment are Easy. Ten years credit:it six per cent interest. A deduction of ten per cent for••ash. The Location is Central, along the 4lst parallel, thefavorite latitude of America. Equally well adapted to cornor wheat; free from the long, cold winters of the Northern,and th

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Image from page 79 of “Swedish Day 1916” (1916)
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Identifier: SwedishDay1916
Title: Swedish Day 1916
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors: Panama-California Exposition Digital Archive
Subjects: Swedish Day 1916 Panama-California Exposition San Diego California
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Contributing Library: The Committee of One Hundred
Digitizing Sponsor: Balboa Park Online Collaborative

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OFF, Proprietor Rates .00 a Day and Up; with Private Bath, .50 per Day and Up; Elevator Service Free Auto Bus Center Shopping District Home Phone 2358; Pacific, Main 3678 1161 FIFTH STREET SAN DIEGO, CAL. Home Phone 4779 Main S86 THE BURNAP HOTEL In the Centre of the City 238 BROADWAYSAN DIEGO. CALIFORNIA Los Angeles, Cal. All cars pass the door PASADENA:Colorado 1S60 LOS ANGELES:Home F 1546; Main 4938 Get a W. B. STIRDIVANT Manager PHOENIX MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. Of Hartford, Connecticut 908-10 Baker-Detwiler Bldg. LOS ANGELES HARRY NOBLE SOUVENIR HAT Wear it on the tripIt is nifty and nice Only costs .00 Write to HERMAN BOSTROM 424 MARSH-STRONG BUILDINGLOS ANGELES THE LIMIT RESTAURANT CORNER BROADWAY AND FRANKLINLOS ANGELES, CAL. ■…-.-.-.. ..•:,. ANTONE SUK g Steam Heat Hot and Cold Water Phones: Main 4630, Home 4342 s HOTEL WHITE HOUSE 1053 SECOND STREET (Just off Broadway) SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA Phone Main 3948 QUALITY EATS % Free Telephone in Each Room Rates .00 Up

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Top Row, from Left to Right—P. Rosell, A. Lauritz, A. Nelson, T. Nerdrum, D. Dahlin, C, Benson.Bottom Row, from Left to Right—£. Ohlund, H. Bostrom, J. Axelson, G. Gustafson, A. Dahlim.The Lower Left Corner—A. Hyberg. Lower Right Hand Corner—H. Berggren. S. S. S. HARMONY By David Dahlin, Secretary The Swedish Singing Society Harmony is a little jewel among the SwedishSocieties of Los Angeles. Thousands of persons of all nationalities have been present at andgreatly enjoyed the concerts and festivals during the past year, not only inLos Angeles, but also in Pasadena and San Pedro and now in San Diego. The S. S. S. Harmony began its life under great difficulties and its presentsuccess is therefore so much more appreciated. It was no easy task to gathertogether good singers, and more difficult yet to procure the right director. Much credit is due our present song leader, Mr. John Axelson, and thanksis also due the different song leaders before him. All concerts and festivals hav

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Image from page 46 of “The clipper ship era : an epitome of famous American and British clipper ships, their owners, builders, commanders, and crews 1843-1869” (1910)
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Identifier: clippershiperaep00clar
Title: The clipper ship era : an epitome of famous American and British clipper ships, their owners, builders, commanders, and crews 1843-1869
Year: 1910 (1910s)
Authors: Clark, Arthur Hamilton, 1841-1922
Subjects: Clipper ships
Publisher: New York : G.P. Putnam’s Sons
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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rectors, Boards of Council, Governors, and Ty-peans.i Eventually, this Company became the rulerof more than one hundred million human beings,not naked savages, but civilized men and women,many of whose ancestors had been learned scholarsand merchant princes long prior to the invasion ofBritain by the Roman, Dane, and Saxon. It is not, however, with the political affairs ofthis Company that I wish to deal, but rather withthe ships and the men who navigated them. Theprincely emoluments known as indulgences inwhich the captains and officers of these ships parti-cipated, naturally attracted the attention of parentsand guardians, so that younger sons, otherwise des-tined for a life of ill-requited repose in the church,the Army, or the Navy, found lucrative service withthe East India Company. These perquisites, whichwere handed out by the Honorable Court of Di- 1 A typean was the head merchant of one of the Com-panys factories or mercantile houses, such as werelater known in China as hongs.

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The East India Company 25 rectors, were no doubt intended to be of pleasingvariety and magnitude. The Company adheredstrictly to promotion by seniority as vacancies oc-curred, from ship to ship when necessary. Captainswere appointed to their ships before launching, inorder that they might superintend their equipmentand get them ready for sea. Midshipmen were ap-pointed by the Court of Directors, and no youthof less than thirteen or over eighteen years waseligible. Second mates were required to be at leasttwenty-two, chief mates twenty-three, and com-manders twenty-five years of age. Captains were entitled to fifty-six and one halftons of space on board the ships commanded bythem, which they might use at their discretion,either to collect the freight or to carry cargo ontheir own account, credit being furnished by thecompany for the latter purpose at the usual in-terest. The rate of freight ranged from £35 to £40per ton, though in 1796 the Admiral Gardner, aship of 813 tons, commande

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Image from web page 816 of “Electric railroad record” (1908)

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Image from page 816 of “Electric railroad journal” (1908)
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Identifier: electricrailway571921newy
Title: Electric railway journal
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Electric railroads
Publisher: [Brand New York] McGraw Hill Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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Comptroller of this City of brand new Yorkfor the 1st time in 1910, Mr. Prender-gast has-been energetic in talks ofthe citys transport problem. Re-cently he’s got assaulted Hylans do-nothing policy, asserting that theMayor by their mindset had forfeitedthe right to interfere. He’s got already been astrong supporter of Governor Millerstraction plan. Mr. Prendergast was born in NewYork may 23, 1867, and attendedpublic schools in Manhattan and Brook-lyn. He entered business within age offourteen. Oliver C. Semple is an innovative new York law-yer, who has had a thorough experi-ence in traction matters. He aided inthe drafting associated with original PublicService Commission legislation and was him-self counsel towards payment be-tween 1907 and 1918. He had been largelyresponsible the drafting of the re-vision of that law as well as the revisionof the rapid-transit act of 1920. Healso assisted in attracting within the Inter-borough plus the Brooklyn fast Tran-sit agreements in 1913. Mr. Semple hasbeen a consistent supporter of Gover-

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(QPaul ThompsonLE ROY T. HARKNESS Photo hy Paul ThompsonGEORGE McANENY IQVndeTwood & UnderwoodMAJOR-GEN. J. F. ORYAN ©Underwood <£ Underwood ■W. A. PRENDERGAST tan. He began their profession as a news-paper man, returning to it as asso-ciate company supervisor of this NewYork Times, in 1915, a post he relin-quished only recently. Mr. McAneny came to be in Green-ville, N. J., on Christmas time eve, 1869.He ended up being educated when you look at the general public andhigh schools of Jersey City, laterstudying legislation, although he never prac-ticed in the club. He served on thecommittee which framed the municipalhome guideline amendments to the StateConstitution adopted in 1894. Le Roy T. Harkness, previous appropriate ad-viser towards ny Public ServiceCommission, is credited with signalservice in safeguarding the citys in-terest into the drafting of this double sub-way agreements. He’s got had a wideexperience in ny traction af-fairs as a result of their long service withthe commission. Recently, utilizing the co-operation ofCharles E. Hughes an

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Image from page 714 of “Churches of Aberdeen : Historical and Descriptive” (1909)
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Identifier: churchesofaberde00gamm
Title: Churches of Aberdeen : Historical and Descriptive
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors: Gammie, Alexander
Subjects: Aberdeen
Publisher: Aberdeen : Aberdeen Everyday Journal Office
Contributing Library: University of Guelph Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Scottish Researches Foundation (Canada)

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ers ap-peared in a local magazine during the time of thefinal dispersion for the herd—The youngerrace of males would say, with much explanation,that in brain of Mr Amos Cruickshankoriginated the ideal and the cattle atSittyton have been reared, and that to himalone belongs the credit of earning tho nameof Sittf great deal ; the older men remember and speakwith admiration of tho power and enterpriseof younger cousin, the belated Mr AnthonyCr.uioksnank, whose passion in cause ofthe shorthorn was not less warm than ended up being thatof the gentleman just who hag lately soably guided the helm at Sittyton. Great, how-ever, as had been the influence which Mr Anthonys(counsels had in moulding early history ofthe herd, to those of a later time the name ofhis sibling will continue to be much more closely bound upwith the great breeding organization about tobe dispersed. Like their moms and dads and brother,Mr Amos Cruickshank ended up being interred in theQuaker burying-ground at Kinmuck, where COMMUNITY OF BUDDIES 345

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Old Meeting-House in Gallowgate. chants, but in Gallowgate Improve-ment Scheme it was swept away in 1907.After fully forty years occupancy, theGallowgate Meeting-House ended up being consideredto need served its time, and it ended up being decidedto erect an innovative new building somewhere else. Thesite selected had been No. 13 Diamond Street,which is occupied by part of the pre-mises of Messrs. C Campbell and Cay. Thenew Meeting-TIouse ended up being built sufficientlylarge to accommodate a General fulfilling,as really on offer the local needs of theFriends inside city. Its hard-on had been underthe supervision of the following membersof the community, who had been appointed by theMonthly Meeting, viz., Messrs. GeorgeBrantingham, Antony Cruickshank, GeorgeCruickshank, and Robert Gray. In 187-4,the Aberdeen Monthly Meeting, in view ofthe small amount of business it had totransact, requested and received permissionfrom the overall Meeting for Scotland tohold these group meetings as soon as every two monthsinstead of once a month as previously. TheDiamond Str

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Image from page 109 of “Annual report of Public Service Commission, plus the … yearly report associated with the Board of Railroad Commissioners” (1914)
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Identifier: annualreportofpu19192mass
Title: Yearly report regarding the Public Service Commission, in addition to … yearly report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Massachusetts. Public-service Commission Massachusetts. Board of Railroad Commissioners. Yearly report
Subjects: Massachusetts. Public-service Commission Public utilities
Publisher: Boston : Wright & Potter Printing Co.
Adding Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Associate Libraries

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, …. various other lawn workers, …… Fuel for garden locomotives, …… Other garden expenditures, ……. Injuries to people, ……. Loss and damage, ……. Other train transport expenses, …. Total transport, train line. Administration,Valuation costs.Other general expenditures. General. Total general expenditures, Grand Total Railway working costs, ,387 05 28,342 01 893 82 612 29 4,228 05 1,722 73 3,380 47t ,805 48 ,368 33 833 64 1 03 1,722 79 464 361 ,461 43 0 88 ,965 06 3,905 27 14,090 23 24,367 42 8,433 59 1,201 62 1,722 75 71 41 453 91 ,211 26 ,738 101,032 202,273 65 ,043 95 6,683 00 t Credit.Operating proportion (ratio of working expenditures to running profits), 10L37 percent. 78 RAILROAD COMES BACK. [Jan. Description of Railroad possessed and managed. Railroad owned.Length of main range, ….Length of side track, etc complete Length of Track possessed, . Railroad operated.Length of primary line, …. period of side-track, etc., …. Total duration of Track operated,

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1920.1 GRAFTON & UPTON. 79 RETURN GRAFTON & UPTON RAILROAD BUSINESS for 12 months ending December 31, 1919. Directors. r- -■ N.vME OF Director. Office Address. Date ofBeginningof Term. Date ofExpirationof Term. George A. Draper,Eben D. Bancroft, .Frank J. Dutcher,George W. Knowlton,Edw. P. Usher, Hopedale, Mass., .Hopedale, Mass., .Hopedale, Mass., .West Upton, Mass.,Grafton, Mass., Jan. 27, 1919Jan. 27, 1919Jan. 27, 1919Jan. 27, 1919Jan. 27, 1919 Jan. 26, 1920Jan. 26, 1920Jan. 26, 1920Jan. 26, 1920Jan. 26, 1920 Main General Officers. Title of Gener.4.l Officer. Name of individual holding Officeat Close of the year. Workplace Address. President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, Gen. Mgr. and Gen. Supt.,General Counsel George A. Draper Eben D. Pancroft Frank J. Dutcher, …. Harry A. Billings Wendell Williams Hopedale, Mass.Hopedale, Mass.Hopedale, Mass.Hopedale, Mass.Milford, Mass. Comparative General Balance Sheet — Investment Side. . , Balance at Beginning of Year. Item. Balance

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Image from web page 271 of “Annual report of this public-service Commission, and the … annual report for the Board of Railroad Commissioners” (1914)

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Image from web page 271 of “Annual report of public-service Commission, plus the … annual report associated with Board of Railroad Commissioners” (1914)
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Identifier: annualreportofpu19162mass
Title: Annual report of Public Service Commission, additionally the … yearly report regarding the Board of Railroad Commissioners
12 Months: 1914 (1910s)
Writers: Massachusetts. Public-service Commission Massachusetts. Board of Railroad Commissioners. Annual report
Subjects: Massachusetts. Public Service Commission Public resources
Publisher: Boston : Wright & Potter Printing Co.
Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

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; o a CO !s o H <: o !3 n O l4 o « H El o -> t^ i5 c3 m 03 _ sl ^ bO O^ c oo 2 £3 i o 3 01-0 S 1^^^ ^ ^-g§ §^^£^g « are ntere; duri: (cha In, &» H-, n ■G O O oo n o C3Q § 6© §«^ to D HH m Iz o £ H& to W (H g o| o Q J « |i o-o s: o 5 <i o 3 n O i£< o H H H O <! K < W o o ^ 1 &H 268 RAILROAD COMES BACK. [Jan. Sundry Current Liabilities.Loans and expenses Payable.Minor records (five in quantity), ,017.73. Depreciation, Path, Gear, and Miscellaneous Bodily Property. Balances at close of the year: accrued depreciation, equipment, .Balances at start of year: accrued depreciation, gear, .Steam locomotives, depreciation, ……. Freight-train cars, decline; passenger-train automobiles, decline, complete, CreditItems.

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Basics of Depreciation Charges.Figured at 3 per cent yearly on cost of equipment at the time we begancharging off for decline, that has been February 1, 1910. Profit-and-loss Account. Item. Debits. Credits. Credit stability at starting of the year, p. 265, Credit stability transferred from earnings, p. 268 Credit stability carried to balance sheet, 0,226 12 7,265 8612,960 26 Total 0,226 12 0,226 12 earnings Account for the season. Item. Amount applicable to your 12 months. Comparison withPreceding Year(Boost). Operating Money. Railway operating revenues, p. 269 Railway running costs, p. 269 8,737 0689,312 12 ,370 5918,794 04 web income from railway functions, ….Railway income tax accruals, p. 270, ,424 942,772 00 ,576 5547 06 Gross income, Deductions from Gross Income. Interest on funded debt, p. 267, Interest on unfunded financial obligation, p. 270, ,652 94 ,316 672,376 01 ,529 49 0 00*640 53* Total deductions from revenues ,692 68 0 53* money Balance transferkbd to

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