mechanical

Image from web page 35 of “Railway mechanical professional” (1916)

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Image from web page 35 of “Railway mechanical engineer” (1916)
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Identifier: railwaymechanica92newy
Title: Railway technical engineer
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors:
Topics: Railroad manufacturing Engineering Railroads Railroad cars
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Simmons-Boardman Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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m the lumber found in bulkheading has some com-mercial worth and therefore the shippers shoukl have the ability to sellit toward consignee. The shipfjers having said that con-tend your lumber used for securing lots does not have any marketvalue if extra dunnage is required the allowanceprovided inside tariffs ought to be increased. The shippers plus the railroads would bencfjl liy bulk-heading open vehicles laden up with lumber. of government and 19,S in support of the providers. Theremaining 121 counts are pending choice. Cases in-volving 878 counts had been dismis.sed, 841 which had been basedupon the companies failure to report all instances of excessservice, as retjuired by an order of percentage. Twocases were de( ided because of the Supreme (.ourt, one against andone and only the federal government. When you look at the circuit process of law of ap-l)eal 8 instances had been determined and only the government, and3 instances were decided in support of the carriers. Other casesare however pending. / Mechanical Department/Qverlooking

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Why don’t you Simply Take AdvaLntage of University andUniversity Facilities? E»gincering Building, Pennsylvania State University. MAINTAIN INDUSTRIAL FELLOWSHIPS! with C. H. BENJAMIN class of Engineering, Purdue Uni* iity, Lafayette, Ind. RAILWAY problems are peculiarly appealing to the scien-tific investigator as they are therefore definite and thus welldeveloped. The railroad guy generally knows just whathe wishes and just why he wishes it. Furthermore, the investigator knows that immediate practicaluse is likely to be made of the datawhich he accumulates or theprinciples which he proves. Purdue University was oneof the very first technical schools totake up railway work, and ithas regularly completed thepolicies therefore inaugurated. Theprincipal credit when it comes to devel-opment of railroad evaluation andinvestigation may properly begiven to W. F. M. Goss, andit was through his efforts thatPurdue University found berecognized due to the fact leadingauthority on railway mechan-ical issues. You start with the installa-tion of Purdue loc

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Image from page 93 of “Weaving; a practical guide to the mechanical construction, operation, and care of weaving machinery, and all details of the mechanical processes involved in weaving” (1909)

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Image from page 93 of “Weaving; a practical guide to the mechanical construction, operation, and care of weaving machinery, and all details of the mechanical processes involved in weaving” (1909)
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Identifier: weavingpractical00amer
Title: Weaving; a practical guide to the mechanical construction, operation, and care of weaving machinery, and all details of the mechanical processes involved in weaving
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors: American School of Correspondence Nelson, H. William (Hector William), b. 1869
Subjects: Weaving
Publisher: Chicago, American School of Correspondence

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Beaming. Before beaming, loosen.the belts around the reel,and add the friction, then tie the yarn to the leader. This isgenerally a piece of burlap attached to the beam. If a smallquantity is tied at once, better warp is made, as the knot will besmaller. The amount of friction required must be determined bycircumstances. Do not make a soft beam, and do not add toomuch friction, or it will strain the yarn; 7 or 8 pounds of steamare sufficient for drying purposes, and it is well to shut off thesteam if the dresser is to be stopped for any length of time, or theyarn will be burned. It is also well to have separate connectionsfor the size vat from the steam pipes, so that they can be runindependently. Press Roll. This is a recent invention for making^ betterbeamed warp ; it also allows more length of yarn to be placed onthe beam. It is of great value, because the beam is harder pressed,thereby preventing the layers from sticking to each other, withless possible chance of uneven cloth. 81

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IDEAL AUTOMATIC LOOM FOR PLAIN GOODS The Geo. W. Stafford Co. WEAVING. PAET I. TWISTING AND DRAWING IN WARPS. In some mills, so little attention is given to this departmentthat it is no uncommon thing to see a warp cut out of a loom onaccount of bad harnesses. This means extra cost credited to theweaving department, for the man who generally has charge of thisbranch is in turn responsible to the overseer of weaving. Lack ofinspection of harnesses when out of the loom, or in the loom whena warp has been woven out, results in considerable unnecessary ex-pense. Harnesses are frequently cast aside, which by means of alittle repairing could be made almost as good as new. A little tallow brushed on the wire heddles and heddle rodswill make the heddles last two or three years longer than if theywere rubbed with oil, and most certainly longer than if no lubricantwere applied. Tallow does not run as much as oil; when placingit on the harnesses, a brush should be used that will apply it to theh

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Image from page 815 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1912)
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Identifier: baltimoreohioemp04balt
Title: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Subjects: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Publisher: [Baltimore, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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transfer it in wheel-barrows to the storage piles, which aremade to conform to the standard Balti-more and Ohio scrap classification. Mostof the scrap is piled in the open, except forsome small parts that are best placedunder cover and are more easily handledfrom a bin. Special reclaimable parts,such as bolts, nuts, bolsters, springs, brakebeams, etc., are, if necessary, taken to thedepartment where that part of the workis performed. An average of about threecars loaded with scrap are received eachday, and about the same amount of re-claimed, salvaged and repaired material,and scrap sold to dealers, is sent out. The scrap for which no other use canbe found is sold to dealers in that com-modity. All scrap material shipped tothe Reclamation Plant belongs to theStores Department and carloads of ma-terial received from division points arebilled to the storekeeper at Baltimore.When scrap is sold to dealers the StoresDepartment is credited with the pro-ceeds—the Stores Department buys the

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THE MAGNET CRANE LIFTS TONS OF SCRAP WITH THE SAME EASE AS A TOY MAGNETPICKS UP A TEN PENNY NAIL THE BALTLMORE AND OHIO ExMPLOYES MAGAZINE 11

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Image from page 909 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1920)
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Identifier: baltimoreohioemp11balt
Title: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Subjects: Railroads — Employees — Periodicals Railroads — United States — Employees
Publisher: [Baltimore, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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M.T. S.plusC.H. D. Prides of the Baltimore and Ohio No. 13—The Young-Old Railroad .A Successful Suggestion System is a Partnership Common Sense Economy Devices and Methods Used at Mt. Clare Can Be Applied in Other Shops T. R. Stuwart Want to Help Get Business? Magazine Correspondents Suggest Do7ens of Interesting New-Ways A Foiled Plan • Strickland Gillilan Hot Off the Wire A Message to All Employe:^ of the Bait imore and Ohio , ,H. M. Jouver Traffic Solicitation (Awarded Second Place in Traffic Solicitation Contest) . George S. Harlan In the Reahn of the Riddle G. H. Pryor Mrs. Brown Gets the Business , Marcaret Talbott Stevens Transportation—A Poem Joseph S. De Ramus Lorain Stopped Costly Leaks during 1923 F. W. Harmon The .j093—Pride of Washington. Indiana C. H. Creager Thirty Years of Friendly Service to Credit of Dr. Edward H. Mathcs W. H. Ball And the Siding Was Christened Christy The Rebuilding and Repairing of Locomotives Edric C. Greaves Furness Withy Line Handles Hea

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