images

Cool Credit Report images

Check out these credit report images:

Image from page 223 of “The Locomotive” (1867)
credit report
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: locomotive34hart
Title: The Locomotive
Year: 1867 (1860s)
Authors: Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Company
Subjects: Locomotives Steam-boiler explosions
Publisher: Hartford, Ct. : Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Co
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
Negri, Theda Bara and Lenore Ulric save the Messrs. DavidBelasco, Arthur Hopkins, Mack Sennett and Charles B. Dil-lingham upward of 7,687 yearly in anthracite coal bills alone,not including the bituminous. In fact it was said at the Lambs Club last night that theseyoung ladies had received a petition from the starving minersin Pennsylvania, requesting them to act cold during the remainderof the winter. The report also went that Mrs. Leslie Carter plans to filesuit for a rebate on 465,876 tons of coal she is alleged to havesaved David Belasco in Du Barry and The Heart of Mary-land. A kiss by John Barrymore saves a theatre a ton of chestnutor a ton and a half of tgg coal, was the opinion of one prominentactor, standing at Broadway and 42nd Street yesterday. The Professors discovery has created quite a stir on Broad-way. Hereafter, actors and actresses who have reputations aswarm babies, may demand a coal-saving clause in their contracts. — New York World. 212 THE LOCOMOTIVE [July,

Text Appearing After Image:
Devoted to Power Plant Protection Published Quarterly Ym. D. Halsey, Editor. C. L. Wright, Assistant Editor. HARTFORD, JULY, 1923. Single copies can be obtained free by calling at any of the companys agencies.Subscription price 50 cents per year when mailed from this epic:.Recent bound volumes one dollar each. Earlier ones two dollars.Reprinting matter from this paper is permitted if credited to The Locomotive of the Hartford Steam Boiler I. & I. Co. Obituary.Joseph Hensley McNeill. THE sudden death of Joseph Hensley McNeill on April 18th,1923, terminated a career of conspicuous service in safe-guarding the use of steam power. From the time of hisappointment to the boiler inspection force of the District Policeof the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in 1898, his thoughts andenergies were devoted to this one purpose. When ten years laterMassachusetts determined by law that public safety in that staterequired standards of boiler construction and of steam operation,he was chosen its ch

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 38 of “Bird lore” (1899)
credit report
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: birdlore71905nati
Title: Bird lore
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: National Committee of the Audubon Societies of America National Association of Audubon Societies for the Protection of Wild Birds and Animals National Audubon Society
Subjects: Birds Birds Ornithology
Publisher: New York City : Macmillan Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
y is a largePurple Martin colony on the main businessstreet, consisting of three bird-houses, con-taining probably ten pairs in each. Here theycome every April and raise their familieswithout apparently being in the least dis-turbed by the noisy traffic going on aroundthem. Here they have come for so manyyears that the oldest inhabitant cannot re-member to the contrary. They were cer-tainly here in 1828, and, how long before,we have no record. Other noteworthy bird appearances herewere a Tufted Titmouse who spent thewinter of 1902 3 with us, whose clearwhistle was frequently heard as he fed withthe Nuthatches and Downies, on the suet,placed on a tree in front of the house; also,a flock of Cardinals who spent the winterin a near-by swamp, and the visit of a flockof Starlings, that came in one of the heavysnows of last winter. The Wood Thrush isplentiful here in summer, with numerousRose-breasted Grosbeaks, and I have oneJarge Snowy Owl to my credit.— Wm. M.Stillman, Plainfield, N. J.

Text Appearing After Image:
A MEMBER OF A FAMILY THAT MAKE THEIR OWN NEST BOXES. FLICKER Photographed by R. H- Beebe at Arcade. N. Y. Bird-Lores Fifth Christmas Bird Census THE results of Bird-Lores fifth Christmas Bird Census are a tributeto the enthusiasm of the true bird lover. In what other branch ofnature study would we find so large a number of students who,under similar conditions, would consider it not only a pleasure but a privi-lege to tramp miles through the snow under threatening skies, with themercury below freezing? Reports have been received from the Atlantic to the Pacific, one observer,indeed, venturing well out on the troubled waters of the Atlantic itself;and they represent from a part of an hour to as many as ten and a halfhours observation. Reaboro, Ontario.—December 23, 1904; time, 10.05 a. m. to 12.15 p. m. ; 1.40 p. m.to 3.30 p. M. Sky dull, heavy thaw; snow in patches; wind southwest; lemp., from 37°to 38°. Ruffed Grouse, 10; Pine Siskin, 58; Brown Creeper, i ; White-breasted Nut-hat

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Read More »

Cool Credit History images

Check-out these credit score pictures:

Image from page 747 of “US journal of pharmacy” (1835)
credit score
Image by Web Archive Book Images
Identifier: americanjour564141884phil
Title: United States journal of drugstore
12 Months: 1835 (1830s)
Authors: Philadelphia College of Pharmacy Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science
Subjects: Pharmacy Pharmacology
Publisher: Philadelphia : Philadelphia University of Pharmacy
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

See Book Page: Book Viewer
About any of it Book: Catalog Entry
See All Images: All Images From Book

Click to view guide on the web to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
ull Lines of Official and Non-Official niAEMACEUTICAL SERVICES AND PRODUCTS. Fld Extracts, Solid ExtractsPowdered Extracts,Effervescing Granules,Medicinal Elixirs,Medicinal Syrups,Sugar Coated drugs,Pure Powdered Drugs,Distilled Waters,Packed Roots and FXerbsMedicinal Lozenges,Resinoids, Dleo-Resins,Suppositories,Medicinal Plasters,Medicinal Tinctures,Saxoline □ intrnents,Miscellaneous Products, E S-R A. 1? L T H IT E T> 37 YEARS. —Urieinators of the brand new IDES of— Preferred Non-Secret Medicines, Domestic and Toilet posts, Economically replacing the Patented or key Nostrums of the day.These in nice kinds, with buyers target, at affordable prices. SEE CATALOGUE No. 82. Delivered Complimentary. Terms.—Liberal Credits to well rated Houses. Also a small Cargo Rebate. Pharmaceutical Catalogue.—Illustrated and priced, on application no-cost. CorrespondenceSolicited. New DrUgS and Noveltie? in Pharmacy, described in present Periodicals. Rare DfUgSand Preparations little used or outdated are held in stock.

Text Appearing After-image:
Am. J. Ph.] 5 [Might, 1884

Note About Images
Take note why these pictures tend to be extracted from scanned page pictures that will have been digitally improved for readability – color and look of these pictures may well not perfectly look like the initial work.

Image from page 715 of “writeup on reviews and world’s work” (1890)
credit score
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: reviewofreviewsw30newy
Title: Review of reviews and planet’s work
12 Months: 1890 (1890s)
Writers:
Subjects:
Publisher: New York Summary Of Reviews Corp
Adding Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

See Book Webpage: Book audience
About any of it Book: Catalog Entry
See All Images: All Graphics From Book

View here to view guide on the web to see this example in framework in a browseable on the web version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
usand miles comprising the landof the plantation at issue and its own two neigh-bors, situated on the leeward or dry side of theOahu, had been rated as absolute waste before the dis-covery they had been underlaid with artesianwater, and with the capacity of becoming irrigated because of it, madecane-growing possible. In 1882, a careful and obviously comprehen-sive federal government report offered the sugar crop forthe island of Oahu as 3,000 tons for the 12 months,and claimed by using economic climate and scientific man-ufacture it may eventually be increased to.5,500. Two decades later, in 1902, the outputor this islands sugar mills was 107,870 tons,—two hundred and eight times the surface limitof boost allowed in the estimation regarding the gov-ernment broker. This impressive increase had been because of to some extent tomanufacturing improvements. The addition oftwo roller mills towards the original three in use upto 1885, as well as the substitution regarding the nine-rollermill the latter, effected an approximate sav- 702 THE AMERICAN MONTHLY REPORT ABOUT REVIEWS.

Text Appearing After Image:
IRRIGATED AND TTNIRRIGATED SUGAR CANE OF THE IDENTICAL AGE. ing of 20 %, in removal. Improvedchopping and shredding device and hot watermaceration have done their part. In 2010,mechanical crystallization machines, very first success-fully utilized in the Java mills, were set up,and are found to complete the task satisfac-torily within just a hundredth of the time for-merly needed. But to irrigation the credit of the greatestportion associated with increase is born. The hefty pro-ducing plantations in the leeward sides of theislands owe their existence to unnaturally appliedwater, and people on windward or rainy sidestrace a sizable inflammation of their output towards the sameagent. Arid places in Hawaii, like in westernAmerica, never having already been put through theleaching drainsof heavy rainfall, are of unusualrichness in limes, phosphates, alongside solubleelements needed in-plant growth ; thus thesuccess attendant upon the irrigation of suchlands isn’t to he wondered at. Considera

Note About Photos
Please be aware why these pictures are obtained from scanned web page photos which will are digitally improved for readability – color and look of the pictures may well not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from web page 678 of “manufacturing reputation for the usa, from the very first settlements to the current time: becoming a total study of US sectors, embracing farming and horticulture; such as the cultivation of cotton, tobacco, wheat
credit score
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: industrialhistor00boll
Title: Industrial reputation for the United States, from the first settlements for this time: becoming a total review of American companies, embracing agriculture and horticulture; like the cultivation of cotton fiber, cigarette, grain; the raising of ponies, neat-cattle, etc.; all of the essential manufactures, delivery and fisheries, railroads, mines and mining, and oil; also a history of coal-miners as well as the Molly Maguires; finance companies, insurance, and trade; trade-unions, strikes, and eight-hour movement; and a description of Canadian sectors
12 Months: 1878 (1870s)
Writers: Bolles, Albert Sidney, 1846-1939
Subjects: Industries Industries
Publisher: Norwich, Conn. : The Henry Bill club. Organization
Adding Library: Harold B. Lee Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Younger University

See Book Webpage: Book audience
About it Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Pictures From Book

Click on this link to view book on line to see this illustration in framework in a browseable web form of this guide.

Text Appearing Before Image:
FIRST WORKPLACE, CENTRAL PACIFIC RAILROAD. ASSOCIATED WITH THE US. 663 tation of troops to those far-away western portions of our domain. In July,1862, two organizations had been included by Congress to create the street. TheUnion Pacific was to start at Omaha, and get westward : the Central Pacific,starting at San Francisco, would be to build off to fulfill it. The Act of 1862, anda subsequent one passed away in 1864, given into the businesses a right of waytwo hundred feet broad through general public domain, and twenty areas ofland per mile, and, additionally, that loan of federal government credit to theamount of ,000 per mile on the prairies, ,000 per mile between theRocky Mountains and Sierra Nevadas, and ,000 per mile for a distance

Text Appearing After-image:
SNOW-SHEDS. of one humdred and fifty kilometers across all of those two ranges. Work beganin 1863. The Central Pacific consolidated using the west Pacific Railroadout to San Jose, the San Francisco, Oakland, and Alameda Company, the SanJoaquin Valley, and also the Ca and Oregon organizations. The work wasprosecuted on both stops associated with range with great power, attracting the attentionand admiration of the whole civilized globe. In 1868 3 hundred and fiftymiles was indeed finished on Union Pacific, and track-laying was goingon in the price of a mile on a daily basis. In May, 1869, the 2 roads found at Ogden,Utah, and an all-rail range existed through the Atlantic to your Pacific Oceans. Thelast surge driven had been made from gold; and the event, telegraphed immediately to all or any 664 INDUSTRIAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES. elements of the Union, was the event of general public rejoicing and excitement every-where. Flags were exhibited, cannon fired, and conferences of public congratu-lation held, to commemorate the completion

Note About Photos
Take note these images are extracted from scanned web page images that’ll have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance among these pictures might not completely resemble the initial work.

Read More »

Cool Credit Bureaus images

Some cool credit bureaus images:

Image from page 74 of “Baltimore and Ohio employes magazine” (1915)
credit bureaus
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: baltimoreohioemp35balt
Title: Baltimore and Ohio employes magazine
Year: 1915 (1910s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Subjects: Railroads Railroads
Publisher: Baltimore, Md. : Employes of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
placed on Mr. Fishersrecord. While going over the track on speeder on July9, signal repairman W. R. Cage discovered a dan-gerous condition on easttrack near Carrcrof t, pro-tected movement oftrains in both directionsand notified sectionmen.Proper credit entry willbe placed on his record. On June 16, engineerWm. Fitzgerald broughttrain No. 227 to a stopbefore reaching trackthat was covered with mud, which had beenwashed down by a very heavy, rain. He was thoroughly acquainted with thephysical conditions and realized that the heavyrains made track conditions abnormal. There-fore, he handled his train under control. Forhis good judgment in this respect, he will havea credit mark placed on his record. Baltimore Division Editor Employes Magazine,Dear Sir: On No. 525 yesterday, I was sitting on theobservation platform when I heard a passengermake the remark: You cannot sit out thisway on some railroads. I asked: Whycant you? And he answered: So many ofthem burn soft coal and it is so dirty.

Text Appearing After Image:
W. R. CAGE 70 THE BALTIMORE AXD OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE I had been observing that fireman C. A.Straw was making an unusually clean run, andalthough I did not acquaint the man with thefact that we did burn soft coal, he was verymuch pleased, and wrhen I got off he said: Iam coming this way again. This shows how much good firemen can do tohelp business and how appreciative some peopleare, and I am sending a copy of this letter tothe bureau of Employment and Discipline withrequest that they place a credit mark on therecord of fireman Straw. Yours truly, P. C. Allen, Superintendent. On Saturday, July 24, a team of horses be-longing to the American Ice Company tookfright in the Washington, D. C, freight }7ard,and the driver, in an attempt to hold them, wasthrown to the groundand so badly injured thathis death took placeshortly after the accident.The horses, however, con-tinued their mad rushand would probably havecaused further troublehad it not been for thepresence of mind of yarddelivery

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Map showing the territory originally assigned to the Cherokee Nation of Indians west of the Mississippi also the boundaries of the territory now occupied or owned by them.
credit bureaus
Image by Mississippi Department of Archives and History
Collection: Historic Map Collection
Call Number:MA/92.0156(c)
System ID: 8183.
Link to the catalog

Map showing the territory originally assigned to the Cherokee Nation of Indians west of the Mississippi also the boundaries of the territory now occupied or owned by them.

Publisher: Washington : Smithsonian Institution-Bureau of Ethnology, 1884.

Please see our profile page for information on ordering.

Scanned as TIFF in 2006/09/18 by MDAH.

Credit: Courtesy of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History.

Image from page 662 of “Kelly Miller’s history of the world war for human right; being an intensely human and brilliant account of the world war and why and for what purpose America and the allies are fighting and the important part taken by the Negro, in
credit bureaus
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: kellymillershist00mill_1
Title: Kelly Miller’s history of the world war for human right; being an intensely human and brilliant account of the world war and why and for what purpose America and the allies are fighting and the important part taken by the Negro, including the horrors and wonders of modern warfare, the new and strange devices, etc. ..
Year: 1919 (1910s)
Authors: Miller, Kelly, 1863-1939
Subjects: World War, 1914-1918 World War, 1914-1918
Publisher: Washington, D.C., Chicago, Ill., Austin Jenkins co
Contributing Library: Wellesley College Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
class, and his record was soconspicuous that it could not go unnoticed by the officialsin Washington. FINAL RECOGNITION. The following letter was then addressed to Jordanscommanding officer by the bureau of navigation: TheBureau notes that John C. Jordan, gunners mate firstclass, has served as such with a creditable service sinceAugust 6, 1899. The chief of bureau directs me to requestan expression of opinion from the commanding officer asto whether Jordan possesses that superior intelligence,force of character and ability to command, necessary fora chief petty officer and particularly as to whether he is inall respects qualified for the position of chief gunnersmate of a first-class modern battleship. The reply to this letter was to the effect that Jordanwas in all respects qualified, and by order of the secretaryof the navy, he was advanced to the grade of chief pettyofficer, filling this position with efficiency to the serviceand with credit to his race, until December 1, 1916, at

Text Appearing After Image:

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Read More »

Cool Credit Bureaus images

Some cool credit bureaus images:

Farmers Co-op, Port Gibson
credit bureaus
Image by Mississippi Department of Archives and History
Collection: Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation Collection
Call number: PI/2010.0002/Series II
System ID: 107877.
Link to the catalog

Farmers Co-op, Port Gibson.

Please see our profile page for information on ordering.

Scanned as TIFF in 2011/10/27 by MDAH.

Credit: Courtesy of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Farmers Co-op, Port Gibson
credit bureaus
Image by Mississippi Department of Archives and History
Collection: Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation Collection
Call number: PI/2010.0002/Series II
System ID: 107874.
Link to the catalog

Farmers Co-op, Port Gibson.

Please see our profile page for information on ordering.

Scanned as TIFF in 2011/10/27 by MDAH.

Credit: Courtesy of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Farmers Co-op, Port Gibson
credit bureaus
Image by Mississippi Department of Archives and History
Collection: Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation Collection
Call number: PI/2010.0002/Series II
System ID: 107875.
Link to the catalog

Farmers Co-op, Port Gibson.

Please see our profile page for information on ordering.

Scanned as TIFF in 2011/10/27 by MDAH.

Credit: Courtesy of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Read More »

Cool Credit Rating images

Check out these credit rating images:

Image from page 370 of “Raleigh Christian Advocate: organ of the North Carolina Conference, M.E. Church, South” (1870)
credit rating
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: raleighchrist1901meth
Title: Raleigh Christian Advocate: organ of the North Carolina Conference, M.E. Church, South
Year: 1870 (1870s)
Authors: Methodist Episcopal Church, South. North Carolina Conference
Subjects: Methodist Episcopal Church, South. North Carolina Conference Methodist Church
Publisher: Raleigh : [s.n.]
Contributing Library: Duke Divinity School Library, Duke University
Digitizing Sponsor: Institute of Museum and Library Services, under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act, administered by the State Library of North Carolina. Grant issued to Duke University for the Religion in North Carolina project.

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
We want this ad inclosed .n writing us We are Dr. I. Sii.i:<s Daniew. Richmond, Va Write a p j.tal t, dsy For B ok Free. GOODoPOSITIONS. You may, without payiDg to the college a cent fortuition, until conrsc is completed and position secured,attend one of Draughns Practical Business Colleges,Nashville, St. Louis, AUanta, tf ontgomery, Uttle Rock,Shreveport, Fort Worth and Galveston. Send for caU-logue; H will ezpUin all. Address: Credit Depart*meat, Draughas College. at dthcr of above places. HICKS CAPUDINE CURES COLD IN HEAD. LaGRIPPE PAINS, HEAD-ACHES, NEURALGIA, FEVERISHNESS AND ACHK8ARISING FROM MALARIOUS CONDITIONS. i^No bad effects whatever. 15, 25, and 50 cents per bottl«at Dmgvtorea. ^■■■^P^pw^r^F^F^^*^—8>—^^-^–lP~^^–>y.~.^ ZACHA^Y A ZACHARY, ArtisticWood Mantels, TIlM, GcatM and Fii«place Trimmings, all ki>^Boilden Supplies. Contractors and Builders^ 106 West lUrtin [Street,RAI^EIOH, N. C:Pho]M|38a ^ , Write lor CstsW*

Text Appearing After Image:
aI V riter 100, ichineoard. |y and [o well pleasemachines. ■IGrH, iN. ( U. 1901. Bladderany per->n curedles and I wd to say^rESTIONfeved me.rid. [AFT, imijohns.Mnts and fty. er. I90I. ipany, VIINERALidity of thesatisfactory )t prepared^tioned, yet complete.le. I allow knocks ittroni aboveice. >outh.rates to all N. C. [RISTIAN am t to this lie it lru{|:isti, N C.INT.

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 27 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)
credit rating
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: streetrailwayj261905newy
Title: The Street railway journal
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation
Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
nd glass. The battery was installed by theElectric Storage Battery Company. At Petaluma an additional current is supplied to the railwayby the California Gas & Electric Corporation from a motor-generator set. This set consists of a 440-hp Stanley syn-chronous motor, driving a 350-kw Bullock generator at 360r.p.m. The motor connections at Petaluma are 4000 volts star,while those at Sebastopol are 2300 volts delta. The passenger service of the Petaluma & Santa Rosa Rail- 14 STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. [Vol. XXVI. No. i. way is handled by ten 45-ft. semi-convertible cars, manufac-tured by the American Car Company, of St. Louis, and W. H.Holman & Company, of San Francisco. These cars are ableto maintain a speed of 35 m.p.h. on the level, and contain bag-gage and smoking compartments. Each is equipped with fourGeneral Electric 70-motors and two 28-A controllers. West-inghouse straight air-brakes are installed with Nichols-Lin-tern pneumatic sanding devices. Wagenhals arc headlights

Text Appearing After Image:
north from Forestville through the Dry Creek Valley to Healds-burg and other prosperous towns on the Russian River. Abranch westward through Sonoma County, with the possibilityof eventually reaching the ocean, is also talked of. The present officers of the Petaluma & Santa Rosa RailwayCompany are: President, John A. McNear, of Petaluma; vice-president, W. F. Kelly, of Oakland; secretary, Thos. Archer;treasurer, Burke Corbett; general manager, E. E. Downs. Much credit for the successful constructionis due to Alfred D. Bowen, who also super-vised the early operation of the road. FIELDS VERSUS ARMATURES NEARESTTROLLEY BY JOSEPH ANDREWS STANDARD PASSENGER CAR ON THE PETALUMA & SANTA ROSA RAILWAY w ith roller-canvas screens are used, and all cars have standardpilots. A half-hour passenger service is operated at present,the cars being despatched by telephone with duplicate trainorders. The passenger rate charged is 2 cents a mile, with aminimum of 5 cents. The companys freight servi

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 167 of “Bank rate and the money market in England, France, Germany, Holland, and Belgium, 1844-1900;” (1903)
credit rating
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: bankratemoneymar00palgrich
Title: Bank rate and the money market in England, France, Germany, Holland, and Belgium, 1844-1900;
Year: 1903 (1900s)
Authors: Palgrave, Robert Harry Inglis, Sir, 1827-1919
Subjects: Bank of England Interest Banks and banking
Publisher: London, J. Murray
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
— nj 1 I ^ ^ ^ BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 167 By W. L. Pereira, Architect

Text Appearing After Image:
tr^ O M E exliibitors1^^ still regard theservices of anarchitect as a luxury.Ive talked to many ofthem who are quitecertain that architectsfees must be added totheir estimated cost—and if they do use anarcliitect, they finallysettle on the lowest feethey can find. Ivenever seen a really progressive or credit-able piece of work result from the com-bination. When an aixhitect undertakes a build-ing commission such as a department store,residence, office building—in fact almostany structm-e Taut a theatre building—hecan usually expect to find the whole jobon his shoulders. If its good he gets thecredit^-if its bad he gets what he de-serves. At any rate, he is hired for what heknows, and generally speaking, the owneris too busy with his own tasks to becomean architect. The owner will usually findtime to make decisions, pay his bills andverify the fact that the arcliitect warrantshis continued confidence. But for a great deal of theatre building,the conditions are somewhat reversed.

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Read More »

Cool Credit Rating images

Some cool credit rating images:

Image from page 582 of “Annual report 1921” (1921)
credit rating
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: annualreport1921onta
Title: Annual report 1921
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Ontario Hydro Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario Ontario Hydro International Inc
Subjects:
Publisher:
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Guelph, University of Windsor, York University and University of Toronto Libraries

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
Municipal Work 247 Mun. Accts., 329, 366,406, 468,479,486,494 Woodstock—Load in Horsepower 63 Cost of Power 102 Sinking Fund 110 Credit or Charge Account 116 Rural Lines 120 Municipal Station 212 Transformer Station 212 Mun. Accts., 329, 366, 407, 468, 479,486,494Woodstock District—Description of Lines 37 Woodville—Load in Horsepower 74 Cost of Power 142 Sinking Fund 144 Credit or Charge Account 144 Rural Lines 146 Mun. Accts., 349, 370, 419, 468, 479,486,494 Wroxeter—Order in Council 2 Wylie Plant 225 Wyoming—Load in Horsepower., 63 Cost of Power 102 Sinking Fund 110 Credit or Charge Account 116 Mun. Accts., 332, 366, 407, 469, 479,486,494 Y Yarmouth—Order in Council 2 York District—Description of Lines…. 43 York Transformer Station 217 Tork Yownship—Municipal Work 253 Comparative Balance Sheet 333 Cost of Power, Power Rates 486 Lighting Rates 494 Z Zurich—Cost of Power 102 Sinking Fund 110 Credit or Charge Account 116 Mun. Accts., 333, 366, 407, 469, 479,486,494

Text Appearing After Image:
/^ V XJ University of TorontoLibrary DO NOT REMOVE THE CARD FROM THIS POCKET Acme Library Card PocketLOWE-MARTIN CO. limited

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 144 of “The romance of a great store” (1922)
credit rating
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: romanceofgreatst00hung
Title: The romance of a great store
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: Hungerford, Edward, 1875-1948
Subjects: Macy’s (Firm)
Publisher: New York, R.M. McBride & Company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
titution areits steersmen, this man, who has his office at the rearof its broad mezzanine balcony, is at least its chiefengineer. And to assist him he has five assistantengineers—assistant general managers, in reality. Thehabit of simile leads one into odd designations of title.Each of these five assistant general managers—we shallstand by the nomenclature of the store—in turn has alarge number of departments reporting to him. Whilein addition to them and ranking as virtual assistantmanagers are the superintendent of the detective bureauand that of the building, itself. The general manager, himself, is charged with thegeneral duty of engaging, training and educatingemployees. He regulates salaries. He controls thetransfer and discharge of employees. He is chargedwith the enforcement of all rules and regulations. Heis the final authority to decide whether or not mer-chandise is returnable, for refund, exchange or credit.He also is the authority who adjusts all claims or con- « n

Text Appearing After Image:
<r]l$mm WHERE MILADY OF MANHATTAN SHOPS The vast ground floor of Macys is, in itself, a mark of much interest and variety ; Organization in a Modern Store 115 troversies with customers. And he is the one to whomemployees may appeal if they feel they are beingtreated unfairly by their superiors. A man-sized jobtruly! And because no one man, short of a super-human at any rate, could ever perform all of its variousand perplexing functions, Mr. Wells has his fiveassistants. In the event of his absence as well as thatof any one of them the man below rises temporarilyinto his immediate superiors job. It is the major task of the first of these assistants todirect the work of the floor superintendents—eight ofthese—and through them that of the section managersand the actual sales forces j nearly two thousand peopleall told. In other words, his job is the selling. Tothis great force and to the countless problems that mustarise in its day-by-day direction there is added the over-sight of

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 18 of “Niagara and Chautauqua” (1891)
credit rating
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: niagarachautauqu00newt
Title: Niagara and Chautauqua
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: [Newton, Samuel B.] [from old catalog]
Subjects:
Publisher: Buffalo, N.Y. Wenborne-Sumner co
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
AND SURPLUS, – – – ,300,000.00. THE Manufacturers 8- Traders Bank ■ ■■ BTjrr-A.XjO, 3sr. -^■. rURECTORS : PASCAL P. PRATT, BRONSON C. RUMSEY, FRANKLIN D. LOCKE, FRANCIS H. ROOT, JOHN D. HILL, ROBERT L. FRYER, JAMES H. MADISON, WILLIAM H. GLENNY, WILLIAM HAMLIN, OFFICERS. PASCAL P. PRATT President. FRANCIS H R(l(iT Vice-President. JAMES H. MADISilN Caskier. HARRY T. RA.MSDELL Assistant Cashier. R. H. IlANI-dK TH Second .Assistant Cashier. ACCOUNTS OF BANKS, Bankers, Manufacturers, Merchants and others received on the most favorable terms.SPECIAL DEPOSITS RECEIVED, on which interest will be paid as agreed.Collections promptly remitted for at lowest rates. Brown Bros. & Co.s Letters of Credit issued.QUARTERLY REPORT, MARCH 21, 1891. RESOURCES. LIABILITIES Loans and Discounts ,187,276.22 Capital 0,000. RESERVE: I Cash on Hand 8,958.57 I Surplus 350,000. Cash with Banks . ,118,178.89 Undivided Profits. ,.. 115,205.76 ViW ^P^^ 4.035.467-86 ,400,673.62 ,400,673.62

Text Appearing After Image:
:i_J!^SSms^^ center the brightemerald of the deepwater curving overthe cliff reflects themost brilliant gems. The illustrationshere appended canconvey but a feebleimpression of the great panorama that presents itself to the eye of thetourist as he views the Falls of Niagara for the firsttime. The number and variety of the objects that pre-sent themselves, and the reflections of the mind thatfollow, all combine to complete the grand scene.Forests, cliflfs and islands; banks, foam and spray,wood, rock and precipice, dimmed with the rising mist,are all seen in one view, canopied and gilded by the softening tin DESCRIPTIVE.—For the reason that the task of describing any scene in nature is difficult in piand that we derive our conception of the same from the comparison it will bear with other works of n;ther reason that Niagara Falls is miujiu, and totally unlike any other scene on the face of the earth, it ito produce such a pen picture of the Falls as can convey to the minds of readers

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Read More »