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Image from web page 274 of “Bill Nye’s history of america” (1894)

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Image from page 274 of “Bill Nye’s history of america” (1894)
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Identifier: cu31924028712069
Title: Bill Nye’s history of the United States
12 Months: 1894 (1890s)
Writers: Nye, Bill, 1850-1896
Topics:
Publisher: Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott Co
Contributing Library: Cornell University Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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uld havedone a cfood deal of trading here, undoubtedly, en-tirely on credit, thus hurting company ver^ muchand loading straight down Washington merchants withbook records, which, added to whatever they hadcharged currently to people in Congress, wouldhave made times in Washington incredibly lifeless. General McClellan, having impressed the coun-try v/ith the concept that he ended up being good connection- their CASH S WORTH AS HE PAYA BATTLE. A FEW MORE FRATRICIDAL STRIFE. 273 builder, but a tad too dilatory within the matter ofcarnage, had been been successful by General Burnside. President Lincoln wrote the Proclamationof Emancipation to your slaves in July, but waitedfor a victory before posting it. Bull Run as avictory wasn’t around his standard ; then when Leewas driven from Maryland the document wasissued where all slaves into the United Statesbecame no-cost ; and, although thirty-one years havepassed as of this writing, they truly are however dropping inoccasionally from the back areas to inquireabout the truth for the report.

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EVEN DROPPING IN OCCASIONALLY FROM BACK DISTRICTS. CHAPTER XXVII. STILL ADDITIONAL FRATERNAL BLOODSHED, ON PRINCIPLE. OUTING QUALITIES VANISH, AND PROVIDE LOCATION TO STRAINED RELATIONS BETWEEN COMBATANTS,WHO START TO MIX THINGS. ON December 13 the years company closedwith the fight of Fredericksburg, underthe management of General Burnside.Twelve thousand Union soldiers were killed beforenight mercifully power down upon the slaughter. The Confederates were shielded by stone wallsand situated upon a commanding level, fromwhich they certainly were able to shoot down the Yankeeswith perfect sang-froid and deliberation. In the midst of all those discouragements, thered cousin fetched loose in Minnesota, Iowa,and Dakota, and massacred seven-hundred guys,women, and children. The outbreak ended up being underthe handling of minimal Crow, and had been confinedto the Sioux Nation. Thirty-nine of these Indianswere hanged on a single scaffold at Mankato,Minnesota, due to this wholesale murder. This execution consti

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Image from page 202 of “The Norwich memorial; the real history of Norwich, New London County, Connecticut, in the great rebellion of 1861-65” (1873)
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Identifier: norwichmemoriala00dana
Title: The Norwich memorial; the annals of Norwich, New London County, Connecticut, inside great rebellion of 1861-65
12 Months: 1873 (1870s)
Authors: Dana, Malcolm McG. (Malcolm McGregor), 1838-1897
Topics: Norwich, Conn. — background Civil war, 1861-1865. [from old catalog]
Publisher: Norwich, Conn., J. H. Jewett and organization
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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already been quite prolonged and bene-ficial character. His entire time is dedicated to this nobleobject, and the zeal and effectiveness of their labors can be attested bythousands of grateful hearts. The unwell and wounded soldier re-turning to their residence has constantly within him a buddy whose sym-pathies were wrought into useful kind, and lots of an anxiouswife, mama, or sister has gotten important advice and directionsin their particular attempts for relief of a suffering spouse, son, or brotherin the field or medical center. It really is toward credit of our town, that so universally ourcitizens had been wanting to make any and each help tothe cause, and to people who went forth to do struggle in itsbehalf, of not one could it be said facile princeps, for themotto for the royal crest seemed to have already been adoptedby all, Ich dien, — I serve. Inside home-service allclasses of your everyone was zealous to fairly share, and theybrought to it a self-sacrificing, substantial spirit, that makesit worth honorable record. XI.

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THE SOLDIERS help COMMUNITY. — WOMANS WORK. 1861-65. No blade have we, no battle-blade,Nor shining spear ; just how shall we aidMy nation inside her great crusade ? I am a female weak and slight,No vocals to plead, no supply to battle,Yet burning up to guide the best. Caroline A. Mason. THE Story of your war wouldn’t be totally or fairly writ-ten, if achievements of woman in connectionwith it tend to be untold. Yet their particular brands are not to befound in official reports, nor gazetted for brilliant deeds,such as made numerous a soldier a hero when you look at the countrys sight.It was in hospitals, in Relief Associations inside their local 178 • THE NORWICH MEMORIAL. cities, in personal ministries into convenience of those theyhad delivered forth using their benedictions, that the patriotismof United states females had been seen and thought. The record of Norwich within value is the one that is de-serving of enduring commemoration and honor. All that couldbe done by our women to give you for and encourage oursoldiers, was done, with an unusual persistency a

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Image from page 426 of “History of Hendricks County, Indiana, her people, industries and institutions” (1914)

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Image from page 426 of “History of Hendricks County, Indiana, her people, industries and institutions” (1914)
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Identifier: historyofhendric01hadl
Title: History of Hendricks County, Indiana, her people, industries and institutions
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Hadley, John Vestal, 1840- [from old catalog] ed
Subjects:
Publisher: Indianapolis, Ind., B. F. Bowen & co., inc.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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study and on which he is now recognized as an authority, having beenappointed by Governor Ralston to lead a state highway commission as itssecretary. He was elected by the Indianapolis Real Estate Board tomake the address for Indianapolis in the convention at Winnipeg, Canada,in 1913, where there were seventy-five cities represented, and a correspondentfor an English newspaper gave him rating and credits over the Springfield,Ohio, representative who won the contest in which they were participating. Mr. Duffey is a native of Hendricks county, born October 24, 1879,the son of Squire Eli F. and Nancy J. Duffey, who are now residents ofPlainfield, this county. He is a grandson of Michael Duffey, who settledat Belleville, Liberty township, Hendricks county, in 1842, and whose fatherfought under Washington in the memorable revolutionary struggle to freethe American colonies. On the maternal side he is the grandson of ElamBenbow, who came from Carolina and settled in Clay township, Hendricks

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LUKE W. DUFFEY HENDRICKS COUNTY, INDIANA. 377 county, in 1S28 with his father, the latter entering a quarter section of landupon which a portion of the present town of Amo is situated. After finishing his common school education, Luke Duffey entered theCentral Normal College at Danville in the autumn of 1897. He completedthe course in law and was admitted to the Hendricks county bar August 4.1900. AVhile in attendance at the college he worked in private families forhis board and took care of the office of Brill »& Harvey for the privilege ofusing the books and getting better acquainted with the routine of work in alaw office; here he developed a definite knowledge of the statutes of descent,becoming an expert titleman and thereby developing his real estate talent.He later became interested in the real estate business and has since devotedhis energies and talents to this field exclusively. His success was assuredfrom the first. Extensive deals soon gaiifed for him a reputation tha

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Image from page 28 of “Hardware merchandising January-June 1897” (1897)
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Identifier: hardwaremerjanjun1897toro
Title: Hardware merchandising January-June 1897
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Hardware industry Hardware Implements, utensils, etc Building
Publisher: Toronto :
Contributing Library: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: Algoma University, Trent University, Lakehead University, Laurentian University, Nipissing University, Ryerson University and University of Toronto Libraries

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MEAKINS & CO. ^eetPaul MONTREAL and Meakins & Sons, Hamilton. P CAUSES OF FAILURE In the Hardware Trade and How Avoided. As long as there are failures, subjects that furnishinformation how to prevent them will always betimely. We have published, in pamphlet form,three admirable papers on the above topic, in whichOverstocking, Expense, Capital, Credit. Dis-counts, Buying, etc., etc., are ably discussed. Wewill mail the whole three essays in*/>rffc ito any address on receipt of IU CCllXS I HARDWARE AND METAL. Toronto nto f ■ ■ ^ – ■ ■■—■ WANTADVERTISEMENTS Are inserted in this paper at the rate oftwo cents per word each insertion, pay-able Strictly in advance. Ad-vertisers may have their replies address-ed in our care free of charge, but mustsend stamps for re-addressed letters. Hardware and Metal, Toronto

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The Hamilton BlastFurnace Co., Ltd. C HAMILTONCanada. Manufacturers of HIGH GRADE Of.. PIG HRO^i

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Image from web page 35 of “Railway mechanical professional” (1916)

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Image from web page 35 of “Railway mechanical engineer” (1916)
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Identifier: railwaymechanica92newy
Title: Railway technical engineer
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors:
Topics: Railroad manufacturing Engineering Railroads Railroad cars
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Simmons-Boardman Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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m the lumber found in bulkheading has some com-mercial worth and therefore the shippers shoukl have the ability to sellit toward consignee. The shipfjers having said that con-tend your lumber used for securing lots does not have any marketvalue if extra dunnage is required the allowanceprovided inside tariffs ought to be increased. The shippers plus the railroads would bencfjl liy bulk-heading open vehicles laden up with lumber. of government and 19,S in support of the providers. Theremaining 121 counts are pending choice. Cases in-volving 878 counts had been dismis.sed, 841 which had been basedupon the companies failure to report all instances of excessservice, as retjuired by an order of percentage. Twocases were de( ided because of the Supreme (.ourt, one against andone and only the federal government. When you look at the circuit process of law of ap-l)eal 8 instances had been determined and only the government, and3 instances were decided in support of the carriers. Other casesare however pending. / Mechanical Department/Qverlooking

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Why don’t you Simply Take AdvaLntage of University andUniversity Facilities? E»gincering Building, Pennsylvania State University. MAINTAIN INDUSTRIAL FELLOWSHIPS! with C. H. BENJAMIN class of Engineering, Purdue Uni* iity, Lafayette, Ind. RAILWAY problems are peculiarly appealing to the scien-tific investigator as they are therefore definite and thus welldeveloped. The railroad guy generally knows just whathe wishes and just why he wishes it. Furthermore, the investigator knows that immediate practicaluse is likely to be made of the datawhich he accumulates or theprinciples which he proves. Purdue University was oneof the very first technical schools totake up railway work, and ithas regularly completed thepolicies therefore inaugurated. Theprincipal credit when it comes to devel-opment of railroad evaluation andinvestigation may properly begiven to W. F. M. Goss, andit was through his efforts thatPurdue University found berecognized due to the fact leadingauthority on railway mechan-ical issues. You start with the installa-tion of Purdue loc

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Image from web page 39 of “The Official National Collegiate Athletic Association lacrosse guide” (1922)

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Image from page 39 of “The Official nationwide Collegiate Athletic Association lacrosse guide” (1922)
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Identifier: officialnational16nationa
Title: The Certified Nationwide Collegiate Athletic Association lacrosse guide
12 Months: 1922 (1920s)
Writers: National Collegiate Athletic Association. [from old catalog] United States Inter-collegiate Lacrosse Association. [from old catalog]
Topics: Lacrosse
Publisher: New York, National Collegiate Athletic Bureau
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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tors responding to the cooler weather condition which greeted themin the North, but were not able to overcome the Canadians, thefinal rating becoming 5 to 4. the outcomes of this games played onthe trip are as follows: Oxford- Oppo-Cambridge nentsApril 1 Lehigh University, at Bethlehem, Pa…. 7 2 4 Pennsylvania S. C., at State university, Pa.. 6 0 7 University of Pa., at Philadelphia, Pa 8 0 8 Johns Hopkins Univ., at Baltimore, Md.. 2 1111 Mt. Wash. L. C, at Mt. Washington, Md. 2 713 Swarthmore university, at Swarthmore, Pa. . 8 9 15 Hobart university, at Buffalo. N. Y 3 8 17 Scalp and Blade A. C, Buffalo, N. Y…. 4 3 19 Cornell University, at Ithaca, N. Y 5 2 21 Colgate University, at Binghamton, N. Y.. 8 4 22 Syracuse University, at Syracuse, N. Y 3 4 25 Harvard University, at Cambridge, Mass.. 5 2 26 Stevens Inst, of Tech., at Hoboken, N. J.. 8 4 27 Princeton University, at Princeton, N. J.. 4 629 Crescent Athletic Club, at New York 1 6 might 1 University of Montreal, at Montreal, Can.. 4 5 Total things 78 73

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Spaldings Athletic Library 33 Lacrosse in Brookl) n tall institutes Brooklyn may claim a sizable an element of the credit forkeeping the old Indian online game of Lacrosse into fore in theUnited shows. Besides the internationally understood Crescents,the City of Churches has in the past and another been thecenter and running base for a few six teams composed ofschoolboys. An interscholastic league were only available in 1916 torevive the overall game one of the schoolboys who had previously been lettingit lapse notably could be the huge reason for the interest in thegame throughout the East at the present time. The high schools comprising the very first league had been ManualTraining, Erasmus Hall, Boys High, Jamaica, Flushing, St.Johns Prep and Stevens Prep of Hoboken. The conclusionof initial championship tournament gave the subject to BoysHigh, which beat completely guide for the only amount of time in the historyof Lacrosse within second school. By 1917 Jamaica, Flushingand St. Johns had fallen out from the league plus 1918,when Stevens dropped, a tiny P

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Performance of Syracuse Home Bureau pageant on reputation for farm life into the …
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Collection: Human Ecology Historical Photographs

Title: Efficiency of Syracuse Residence Bureau pageant regarding the history of farm life inside condition. Undated.

Collection #23-2-749, item PR-PO-10
Div. Rare & Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library

Persistent URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5w8f

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Image from page 189 of “India rubber world” (1899)

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Image from page 189 of “India rubber world” (1899)
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Identifier: indiarubberworld49phil
Title: India rubber world
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Rubber industry and trade
Publisher: [Philadelphia, Bill Brothers Publishing Corp.]
Contributing Library: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden
Digitizing Sponsor: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

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graphical knowledge.During the year under report additional land was acquired forthe purposes of the Museum and its annexes, while further recom-mendations are made in the same directions. ZOOLOGICAL GARDEN.Several valuable specimens were added during the year, thetotal number of animals being increased from 680 in January to720 in December. This number included 234 different species,220 of which belonged to Northern Brazil (Para, Amazonas,Maranham. Ceara). AQUARIUM.The aquarium was finished during the year 1910, but owingto the glass sides not proving sufficiently strong to resist thepressure of the water they had to be replaced bj others strongerin character. BOTANIC GARDEN.The report states that while the aspect of the garden reflectsgreat credit on those engaged in its conservation the want is felt of a scientific assistant. Nevertheless, various notable improve-ments were made, particularly in connection with the opening ofnew sections to replace the older portions which had been

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.ihKiAl.l.s ALAK ObIDOS, St.^TE OF PaRA. abandoned on account of their sandy and infected nature. Theolder parts of the garden were devoted to the extension of therubber plantation. Reference is made to the important collec-tions of orchids and other plants contributed by CommanderSimao da Costa and by Sr. Adolpho Ducke. At the Experimental Station the tapping was continued of thetwo groups of rubber trees referred to in the previous annualreport—with encouraging results. One group of these trees, from10 to 13 years old, tapped during the months October to ^lay,with a knife invented by the director, gave an average yield indry rubber of about 13 grams (nearly 14 ounce) per tree per day. The Amazonian Herbarium was supplemented by 772 varieties,while the General Herbarium received a contribution of 50 plantsgathered in the State of Ceara by Dr. Snethlage.LIBRARY. Owing to the efforts of Dr. Rodolpho R. Schuller, actinglibrarian, the elements have been partly collected for an Ama-

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Image from page 106 of “The street railway review” (1891)
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Identifier: streetrailwayrev04amer
Title: The street railway review
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: American Street Railway Association Street Railway Accountants’ Association of America American Railway, Mechanical, and Electrical Association
Subjects: Street-railroads
Publisher: Chicago : Street Railway Review Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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SECOXn FLOOR PLAN. explanatory and the third floor is supposed to be devotedexclusively to offices, executive or otherwise. Six tracksare designed for the station shown. The special featureof the design is of course the ease with which passengers may be handled in very large number without mixingthose in coming and those out-going.

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PLAN OK FIRST FLOOR. THE NATIONAL RAILWAY COMPANYSREPORT. The National Railway Company, of Illinois, owningand operating five of the St. Louis street railways, com-prehended under the Cass avenue and Fair grounds sys-tem, held its annual meeting, January 23. The principalowners are Chicago men. The report reflects great credit on the management ingeneral, and upon Capt. Robert McCulloch, in particular. The net gains of the property were, 9,947, or9.0S85 per cent on the stock, against 10 per cent earnedin 1892. The receipts decreased 1.4 per cent. Theoperating expenses were 60.12 per cent of receipts,or, 1,851. The net receipts were, 4,966. Thenumber of trips, last year, was 877,302, a decrease of16,989; car mileage, 11,844,031; passengers carried,28,313,504. Gross receipts of the cable lines, ,035,445;decrease, ,987; gross receipts of horse and electric,1,372; increase, ,258. The cable lines operatingexpenses were, 59.4 of the income; of the horse andelectric, 64 p

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Image from page 177 of “Annual report of this Maine Agricultural Experiment facility” (1885)

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Image from page 177 of “yearly report of Maine Agricultural Experiment Station” (1885)
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Identifier: annualreportofma1910main
Title: Yearly report associated with Maine Agricultural test Station
Year: 1885 (1880s)
Writers: Maine Agricultural Experiment Station
Topics: Agriculture Agriculture
Publisher: [Orono, Me Personally. : Maine State University]
Adding Library: American Museum of Natural History Library
Digitizing Sponsor: American Museum of Natural History Library

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bigger thanthe brush of an ordinary Barred Plymouth Rock hen and lookedexactly just like the comb of a male bird. This was additionally true ofthe wattles. The dimensions* of this comb with this bird were below: Length 88.4 mm. Calculated height 25.1 mm. Area 22.2 cm. For typical adult Barred Plymouth Rock females the follow-ing average values for comb size happen found: ** Mean size 50.80 ± .56 mm. Mean calculated level 10.57 — -^3 i^ni- Mean area 5.59 ^1= .17 cm. *These papers are (i) Studies regarding Physiology of Reproduction inthe Domestic Fowl. III. An instance of Partial Hermaphroditism.Biol. Bulletin, Vol. XVII, pp. 271-286, igog. (By R. Pearl and MaynieR. Curtis). (2) A Triple Yolked Egg. Zool. Anzeiger, igio. (Inpress). (By R. Pearl). *Made relative to the strategy explained by R. and JM. D.Pearl in a paper information on Variation inside Comb associated with the Domestic Fowl,Biometrika, Vol VI, pp. 421-423. **Pearl, R. and M. D., !oc. cit., p. 427. 120 Maine; farming research place. 1910.

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Fig. 80. Outline of horizontal areas of the brush associated with the BarredPlymouth Rock hen described in this report. This overview is actual dimensions. Its evident from the numbers the brush inside speci-men significantly exceeds in dimensions the average for females of thevariety. Regarding behavior this bird resembled an ordinary hen rathermore than a cock. She had been never heard to cluck, but orto make the sounds which typical energetic hens make inthe span of the days work. This bird most likely never laidan egg, though we have been sadly unable to make an abso-lute declaration on this point. The egg files of this Stationshow an egg into the credit with this bird on November 7, 1907.This had been truly the only egg ever before recorded because of this bird, and it isundoubtedly an erroneous record. The healthiness of the sexualorgans wasn’t such to point that they had ever before beenfunctional. Cockerels placed in the pen using this bird would you will need to fightwith the woman as though she were a cockerel, but she would maybe not fight.We have

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