1916

Image from web page 35 of “Railway mechanical professional” (1916)

Consider these credit file photos:

Image from web page 35 of “Railway mechanical engineer” (1916)
credit file
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: railwaymechanica92newy
Title: Railway technical engineer
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors:
Topics: Railroad manufacturing Engineering Railroads Railroad cars
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Simmons-Boardman Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

View Book Page: Book audience
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Photos: All Photographs From Book

View here to view book on line to see this illustration in framework in a browseable web version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
m the lumber found in bulkheading has some com-mercial worth and therefore the shippers shoukl have the ability to sellit toward consignee. The shipfjers having said that con-tend your lumber used for securing lots does not have any marketvalue if extra dunnage is required the allowanceprovided inside tariffs ought to be increased. The shippers plus the railroads would bencfjl liy bulk-heading open vehicles laden up with lumber. of government and 19,S in support of the providers. Theremaining 121 counts are pending choice. Cases in-volving 878 counts had been dismis.sed, 841 which had been basedupon the companies failure to report all instances of excessservice, as retjuired by an order of percentage. Twocases were de( ided because of the Supreme (.ourt, one against andone and only the federal government. When you look at the circuit process of law of ap-l)eal 8 instances had been determined and only the government, and3 instances were decided in support of the carriers. Other casesare however pending. / Mechanical Department/Qverlooking

Text Appearing After Image:
Why don’t you Simply Take AdvaLntage of University andUniversity Facilities? E»gincering Building, Pennsylvania State University. MAINTAIN INDUSTRIAL FELLOWSHIPS! with C. H. BENJAMIN class of Engineering, Purdue Uni* iity, Lafayette, Ind. RAILWAY problems are peculiarly appealing to the scien-tific investigator as they are therefore definite and thus welldeveloped. The railroad guy generally knows just whathe wishes and just why he wishes it. Furthermore, the investigator knows that immediate practicaluse is likely to be made of the datawhich he accumulates or theprinciples which he proves. Purdue University was oneof the very first technical schools totake up railway work, and ithas regularly completed thepolicies therefore inaugurated. Theprincipal credit when it comes to devel-opment of railroad evaluation andinvestigation may properly begiven to W. F. M. Goss, andit was through his efforts thatPurdue University found berecognized due to the fact leadingauthority on railway mechan-ical issues. You start with the installa-tion of Purdue loc

Note About Photos
Please be aware that these images tend to be extracted from scanned web page photos which could being digitally enhanced for readability – color and appearance of the illustrations might not perfectly look like the first work.

Read More »

Image from page 52 of “Suggestive studies of school conditions; an outlined study in school problems for women’s clubs, parent-teacher associations and community organizations” (1916)

Some cool credit report images:

Image from page 52 of “Suggestive studies of school conditions; an outlined study in school problems for women’s clubs, parent-teacher associations and community organizations” (1916)
credit report
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: suggestivestudie00wisc
Title: Suggestive studies of school conditions; an outlined study in school problems for women’s clubs, parent-teacher associations and community organizations
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors: Wisconsin. Dept. of Public Instruction Aiken, Janet Rankin, 1892-1944
Subjects: Parents’ and teachers’ associations Public schools Education
Publisher: Madison, Wis.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
class, givinga summary of the beginning of three or four interesting story books andsuggesting to the children that these are available in the library for theiruse. After a period of such endeavor, make another book shelf, showingthe percentage of books used, and use this as contrasting data in place ofcomparing poor conditions with the best possible ones as shown in plateXII. Check the teachers use of Lessons on the Use of the School Li-brary in the various grades. Are teachers using this bulletin (publishedby the state department of public instruction)? Can they be induced to doso? Be sure that they use in each grade the work which is outlined asproper for that grade. In looking over the books find the ones which show most signs of wear.Ask the children in the various grades which books they have read in ♦See bulletin Suggestions on Reading in the Grades by Miss Annie Reynolds,issued by the Wisconsin State Department of Public Instruction. The School Library 47 THE SCHOOL LIBRARY

Text Appearing After Image:
Out of each 20 books4 are read yearly rrj [^ Why not have them all read? Encourage your children to readGive them school credit for readingProvide interesting books to readRead yourself READING MAKETH A FULL MAN PLATE XII 48 Suggestive Studies of School Conditions the school Hbrar- during the past month or year, and find out from theselists which are the most popular. It is sometimes well to institute a readingcontest between classrooms to see which can report on the greatest numberof books within a year. Pupils may be encouraged to read by individual reports on books read,by a library hour (the hour at the close of the Friday afternoon sessionto be given over to reading and telling stories), by the formation of a read-ing circle (write the Wisconsin Teachers & Young Peoples Reading CircleBoard at Madison, Wisconsin,) by debates on topics of current interest,reports on current events, use of general material in reading lessons peri-odically (abandoning reading textbooks and havin

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 690 of “The tree book : A popular guide to a knowledge of the trees of North America and to their uses and cultivation” (1920)
credit report
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: treebookpopularg1920roge
Title: The tree book : A popular guide to a knowledge of the trees of North America and to their uses and cultivation
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: Rogers, Julia Ellen, b. 1866
Subjects: Trees
Publisher: New York : Doubleday, Page
Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
culture in various parts ofNew England, is herewith set down: Average cost of land per acre .00 Average cost of raising seedlings and planting . . 4.84Average taxes at 2 per cent, for 40 years . . . .3.20 Total J12.04 Compounding interest on each item for forty years bringsthe total cost per acre to .99. An average yield is fortycords of box-board timber worth per cord from each acre.This is worth on the stump 0. Deducting the cost, .99, abalance of 9.01 remains as net profit. This is a net annualreturn of .15 per acre, with 4 per cent, compound interest 479 Profitable Tree Planting computed for forty years. Twenty years added greatly increasesthe profits. The New England farmer cannot help the Kansas farmer,except to prove that principles are universal in application. For-estry is not alone for the corporation and the state. It is practic-able also on a limited area, and the smaller the woodlot the moresimple the problem and the more perfectly it may be solved. 480

Text Appearing After Image:
Copyright, 1905, by Doubleday, Page & Company FRUIT AND AUTUMN LEAVES OF FLOWERING DOGWOOD (Cornus florida) CHAPTER IV: THE WOODLOT THAT PAYS One might think the farmers woodlot unworthy of mentionin a grave conference over the forest problems which now con-front the American people. Yet a recent census report gives630,000,000 acres of land in farms in the United States. Ofthis, 200,000,000 acres is wooded, almost one-third of the whole. From this vast acreage the farmers get cordwood to burnand to sell. They haul logs to the sawmills and get cash orlumber in return. Telegraph and telephone poles, posts, railroadties, nuts, Christmas trees—all these are sold from the woodlot.Beside fuel and fencing, the farmers get timbers for their barns,sheds and corn cribs. Their wagon tongues, axe handles andwhiffletrees are largely made from sticks of seasoned timber,furnished by the woodlots. If strict account of sales were keptand credit were given for things sold and used at home, the wo

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Read More »

Image from page 16 of “ground-water when you look at the Hartford, Stamford, Salisbury, Willimantic and Saybrook areas, Connecticut” (1916)

Some cool no-cost credit history photos:

Image from web page 16 of “Ground water into the Hartford, Stamford, Salisbury, Willimantic and Saybrook areas, Connecticut” (1916)
free credit history
Image by Web Archive Book Images
Identifier: groundwaterinhar00greg
Title: Floor water into the Hartford, Stamford, Salisbury, Willimantic and Saybrook places, Connecticut
12 Months: 1916 (1910s)
Authors: Gregory, Herbert E. (Herbert Ernest), 1869-1952 Ellis, Arthur Jackson, 1885- joint writer State Geological and Natural History Research of Connecticut
Topics: Water-supply
Publisher: Washington, Govt. Print. Down.
Adding Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

See Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
See All Images: All Photos From Book

Just click here to view guide online to see this illustration in framework in a browseable internet based form of this guide.

Text Appearing Before Image:
water level in wells.The support hence received is acknowledged with thanks a lot. No-cost use was made of the technical literary works deahng withwater products and credit is given for specific realities obtained from thesesources, but the report includes additionally material collected from thereports of past investigations, several of which can not be rightlyattributed to your one author. AREAS SELECTED FOR LEARN. Areas with which this report can be involved represent the typicalgeologic conditions of Connecticut. (See fig. 1.) The Hartfordarea mcludes the cities of Hartford, western Hartford, Newington,Wethersfield, East Hartford, Manchester, Windsor, East Windsor, 12 r.ROUND WATER IN THE HARTFOEO AXD AREAS, CONN, oissviy± NVDiAoayo QNV d^aiO QNV NvidQiNVD Diozoanvd o i…….-i ^ o i/> i >- Q. •o I. U 1_ rapO -00 ^~ -Q -o => Vl- h 05 1) l-> 0) X -1- nj CD O ° m — CO ro

Text Appearing After Image:
RELIABILITY OF DATA. 13 Southern Windsor, and Bloomfield. It lies in the Connecticut Rivervalley and is imderlain by Triassic sediments and lavas. The Stamford location mcludes the cities of Stamford and Greenwich.It hes into the southwest spot for the State and it is underlain by crystal-luie rocks. The SaUsbury location is within the northwest corner of State andincludes the towns of Sahsbury, Canaan, and North Canaan. Thelowlands of this type tend to be underlam by hmestone. The tons of Windham and Frankhn tend to be designated hi this reportas the Willimantic location. They truly are operating out of the east highlandsand are underlain by metamorphic rocks of various kinds, on whicha very diverse geography has been developed. Saybrook, Essex, Westbrook, and Old Lyme, which make up theSaybrook location, are at the mouth of Connecticut River, where theland is reduced and relatively level and in which the existence of saltwater is an attribute of ground-water issues. RELIABILITY OF DATA. The principal well data receive in tables

Note About Pictures
Please note that these images are obtained from scanned page photos that will happen digitally improved for readability – color and look of the illustrations may not completely look like the first work.

Image from page 11 of “Hardware merchandising January-June 1898” (1898)
free credit report
Image by online Archive Book Images
Identifier: hardwaremerjanjun1898toro
Title: Hardware merchandising January-June 1898
12 Months: 1898 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Hardware industry Hardware Implements, utensils, etc Building
Publisher: Toronto :
Adding Collection: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: Algoma University, Trent University, Lakehead University, Laurentian University, Nipissing University, Ryerson University and University of Toronto Libraries

View Book Page: Book audience
About any of it Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Photographs From Book

Click the link to view book online to see this illustration in framework in a browseable on the web form of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
f metals. How these earlyprimitive people discovered the uses ofthings must, naturally, have now been throughtheir desires and requirements, particularly afterthey left pastoral and tent life and began tobuild urban centers. The Arabs tend to be paid withbeing very early familiar with the alloys,though alchemy, as a science, dates onlyfrom the sixteenth century. OUTLOOK IN NORTHWEST. Among the travelers returning east onSunday were Mr. Sanderson, a member ofthe wagon-manufacturing company of Adams &Sons, Paris, Ont., and Mr. Bell, of St.George, Ont., an associate for the implementfirm of Bell & Sons because city. Thesegentlemen have already been through western,visiting the different representatives of these companies,and report collections as very encouragingparticularly into the regions. The outlookfor business in the west is extremely gratifying toall Ontario producers, as every broker islooking forward to an elevated spring tradein their region.—Free Press, Winnipeg. EQUIPMENT AND METAL The American Axe & Tool Organization

Text Appearing After-image:
MAKERS OF Axes, Adzes, Hatchets, Mattocks, Picks, etc. T. C. COLLINS No 10 St. John St., Montreal Agent for Canada.Catalogues and cost checklist on application. 253 Broadway NYC AN OUTFIT WHEN IT COMES TO KLONDYKE. MR. J. E. CHIPMAN, a commissionmerchant of Vancouver, B.C., hasissued a circular containing muchinteresting information regarding the silver fieldsof British Columbia therefore the Yukon and theeasiest solution to reach thern. Speaking ofthe ensemble needed by a miner just who intendsgoing to Klondyke, the circular says : Here ensemble will soon be about an average required bya miner or pro3pector starting the Yukon. Obviously, itcan be manufactured less, or even more, in line with the require-ments and intention) associated with the buyer, as to the length ofti e he ntends to remain in the nation, etc.: PROVISIONS. 10 pounds. evaporated onions75 granulated sugar1 black pepper1 bottle red pepper15 pounds. salt6 doz. yeast cakes10 lbs. cooking powder75 rolled oaU4 bars castile soap1 situation suits 1 field candles 2 lbs.

Note About Photos
Please note these images tend to be extracted from scanned page photos which will have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and look of the illustrations might not completely look like the original work.

Read More »

Image from page 105 of “Nineteenth Annual Report of The National Farm School November, 1916” (1916)

Check out these credit report images:

Image from page 105 of “Nineteenth Annual Report of The National Farm School November, 1916” (1916)
credit report
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: nineteenthannual1916farm
Title: Nineteenth Annual Report of The National Farm School November, 1916
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects: National Farm School (Doylestown, Pa.)–Annual reports.
Publisher: Farm School, Bucks Co., Pa.: National Farm School
Contributing Library: Delaware Valley College, Joseph Krauskopf Memorial Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
BLAUNERS 833-35 Market St. Philadelphia The New Kind of aWomans Specialty Store The term Womans Specialty Store hascome to be associated with freakish outer-garments at exorbitant prices. We aim to associate it with modish,though sane and practical garments atmoderate and value-giving prices. Womens Coats, Suits, Dresses, Furs,Blouses and Hats. Everything for the Kiddies. Stop in on your next shopping trip,and learn the meaning of our slogan— Styles Superb—Values Supreme

Text Appearing After Image:
The Integrity Title InsuranceTrust and Safe Deposit Co, S. W. Cor. Fourth and Green Sts.. Philadelphia Capital Stock, Full Paid 0,000.00 Surplus 1,175,000.00 Undivided Profits 190,819.99 Deposits 4,753,626.88 BANKING DEPARTMENTReceives money on deposit, subject to I, i-c-j jr ■^-j. T*i check on sight, allowing 2 per cent, interest. IH ^^ ^ B^w bS Rents boxes for safe keeping of valuables in ^m ^^L % H|B ^9 burglar and fire-proof vaults, for S3.00 and EZ. ^f 1„_ ^iS^^a upwards. Letters of Credit and International Cheques for Travellers issued, available every- SAVING FUND DEPARTMENTOpen from 9 A. M. to 4 P. M.Monday to 7 P. M. Saturday to 1 P. M. 3 per cent, interest allowed on deposits.TITLE AND REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENTExamines and insures titles to real estate. Collects rents, dividends, interest, etc.Money loaned on mortgage and mortgages for sale. Attends to all details pertaining tobuying, selling and conveying of real estate. TRUST DEPARTMENTTransacts all Trust Company busin

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 499 of “Annual report of the Public Service Commission, and the … annual report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners” (1914)
credit report
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: annualreportofpu19182mass
Title: Annual report of the Public Service Commission, and the … annual report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Massachusetts. Public Service Commission Massachusetts. Board of Railroad Commissioners. Annual report
Subjects: Massachusetts. Public Service Commission Public utilities
Publisher: Boston : Wright & Potter Printing Co.
Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
n of gravel pitat Salem Street, Medford. Balance on account contract pending settle-ment. Balance on account contract pending settle-ment. Telephone rentals due, bill not yet rendered, . ,741 2023,638 01 1,692 101,410 474,376 00 13,847 15 6,360 87 7,703 40 2,558 94 ,328 14 Depreciation, Road, Equipment and Miscellaneous Physical Property. CreditItems. Retirement of passenger and combination cars Retirement of miscellaneous equipment, ….. Retirement of power plant and equipment, . . . _ .Replacement charges: way and structures, §80,461.78; equipment, ,268,59, . . . . Balances at close of year: accrued depreciation, road and equipment,Balances at beginning of year: accrued depreciation, road and equipment, Equipment (depreciation), Way and structures, depreciation, Power, depreciation, . . . … Tremont subway equipment, depreciation, Salvage from sale of power plant equipment, . . Replacement credits: way and structures, ,596.30; equipment, ,447.85; power, 7d Total,

Text Appearing After Image:
8,568 24 120,000 00 80,000 00 120,000 00 2,042 59 6,200 00 2,687 98 d Debt. 1919. BOSTON ELEVATED. 497 Profit and Loss Statement. Item. Debits. Credits. Credit balance transferred from income account, p Delayed income credits, p. 504, Miscellaneous credits, p. 504, . Debit balance at beginning of year, p. 487, Dividend appropriations of surplus, p. 497, Delayed income debits, p. 504, Miscellaneous debits, p. 504, Balance carried forward to balance sheet, p. 487, Total, 7,555 86 835,779 00 1,488 62 52,831 84 28,557 78 7,505 86105,906 29252,800 95 ,076,213 10 ,076,213 10 Dividends declared during the Year. rrr- Name op Secubitton which Dividend Rate Per , Cent(Regular). Par Valueof Amounton whichDividend wasdeclared. Amount ofDividend. Date. WAS DECLABED. Declared. Payable. Common stock, .Common stock,Common stock, . y?. ,879,40023,879,40023,879,400 8,191119,397358,191 Feb. 9, 1917Apr. 18, 1917Aug. 6, 1917 Feb. 15, 1917May 15, 1917Aug. 15, 1917 Total, . 5,779 In

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Read More »