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Image from page 26 of “Report of the Bureau of Mines of the Department of Internal Affairs of Pennsylvania” (1899)
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Identifier: reportofbureauof1898penn
Title: Report of the Bureau of Mines of the Department of Internal Affairs of Pennsylvania
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Pennsylvania. Bureau of Mines
Subjects: Pennsylvania. Bureau of Mines Coal mines and mining
Publisher: [Harrisburg] : The Bureau
Contributing Library: The University of Scranton Weinberg Memorial Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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nrivalled coking coal fields, containedwiihin the Blairville basin, from Jacobs creek, its northern bound-ary, to Uniontown and Fairchance, without a break, or from its vastand practically untouched gas and steam coal territory held withinthe Lisbon trough, between the Youghiogheny and Monongahelarivers, this county, or at least its western half, is destined to be-come a vast supply station from which thousands of tons of highgrade fuel wealth are to be distributed far and wide, to meet the wantsof distant communities. This Connellsville seam of coal yields from 8 to 10 feet of work-able coal. The coal is clean, almost free from slate and sulphur, re-markably soft, easily mined and uniform in quality and thickness.The purity of this coal and its chemical and physical characteristicsuTake it peculiarly adapted for coking and gives it great value. It iseasily mined, and cokes with but little care. It is this ease of mining and coking that makes it possible to put coke from this districl

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Coking Pnrrss No. 11. BUREAU OF MINES. xxi iu competition with cokes and fuels in the juost distant parts ofthe United States. History and Growth. During the past quarter of a century many of our largest indus-tries have made their most noticeable advancement, yet none hasmade more rapid strides or been of greater importance and valuethan tlie manufacture of coke. The date of the first production ofcoke is iu doubt. By some authorities it is claimed that it was usedin the United States some years prior to 1770. Be this as it may,the best authenticated history gives Isaac Meason credit for thefirst production of coke in the Connellsville region. In 181G and 1817he built the first rolling mill erected west of the Allegheny moun-tains, at Ilumsock, Fayette county, and this mill went into opera-tion in September of the latter year. The coke was used in the re-hneiy and was made in Fayette county. In 1836, F. H. Oliphantbegan the use of coke as a fuel in Fairchance Furnace. From abouttiiat

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Image from page 18 of “Annual report of the State Board of Equalization of the State of Montana” (1890)
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Identifier: annualreportofst1904mont
Title: Annual report of the State Board of Equalization of the State of Montana
Year: 1890 (1890s)
Authors: Montana. State Board of Equalization
Subjects: Taxation
Publisher: Helena, Mont. : Journal Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Montana State Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Montana State Library

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.,.. Libraries MusicalInstruments. Furniture. Jewelry Franchise. Companies. Mortages, Bonds,Etc 00 COCM 1—1OO 5S 8 ^ Ol lO UO M oi o La CO ira o LC5:5 CO 1-! CO OS ^ T-H OO 00 i-i t- (TO O CO CD CP OO cft o OO CO lif rH tH LO O O -31 01 CP CO CD CO O 10 LO lO CD co io CM c-* of 53 tH LO C- 05 CP l^ CM 00 crs 05 CD CP rH t-j 10 ITS g CM CO_^■ CP iH Cp 10 CM ii LH) LO jO O E>- 05 05 05 10 O Oi o o o in o CM CP 00 t~ -r:Jco_ COcp us CO 00 CO g CD -5; o ^ IP Tfl T-H is lo m cr. oj CO o O fOL- 10 7-1 CI t – CO ic to 00 C^l CM 05 o in g g 00 00 CM in in 00 ,-1 ^ CO 35 CM cm i-T CP c- cS o c= CO mcp__ th 00 cm cm__ ^ T-T •* CO 5q ^ 0_ CM.0 U5 c- T-i in 00 i5 ?3 CM o 05 in ^ CO O CM CP o c-^05 CP 00 c~f cD_^ 01 in o CO rH Cot—05 1-1 CD CM ^ cd ITS ^ a O nJ 03 c f-1 m CD rd d ?; m o o 05 >^ CO r-^ O cd c-^ 210 CD ^ in ^ r Cd P E ^ -J O 3 V .2^ .52 tc o o <y STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION. 17 O lO o S o g M O ctI ^ So t- i£ 00 ttI CTi 00 o ir^ eq rH r-l lO O LC5T-H 05 1-1Ol CO Ol

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O to »5i 5^ 00 c- ^??8 o o? COco ce o g Oj o7; > <U Ph 02 w I- <35 855 b3 ^ ^ S 0) o o :—: — 18 FOURTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT Total ValuePersonal Property Total Value LiveStock Total, Any OtherPersonal Property Tools andMaterials ., Proceeds ofMines InsurancePremiums , Ore Bank Stock, Bank Notes, Sur-plus and Profits.. Money on Hand. Solvent Credits t- LO M «n ,-1 ?0 C. 00 O Co T-T csj SO 59 to 00 »0 O tHCO C-} CO cojgo T-i ■ i-T U5 to tcf M< 00 00 00 C- cvq CO ii to o CO CO r4 ^ 8 S T-I CO tH CO 00 rH ^ Lo c^ o so CO 00 lO 55 O T-I o <J5 t- CO so CO lO tH cq l-HrH O ^ li5 O as 00 rHO CO CO oi lo ico go =o S? ^ ^ IS 55 CvJ C^l Oi CO00 U3 CO 99. =^ Oi s ^ M ^ OS O C<1 COco <^ CO t-. CO 00 oo^ co_^ ^ ^ O o «o c<i OS O O LQ o S5 ^ (M CO Cv) as (jv, _0o5- O T-I O?5 S CO N T-I tH siiii O

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Image from page 118 of “The political manual, comprising numerous important documents connected with the political history of America” (1864)
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Identifier: politicalmanualc00inhiat
Title: The political manual, comprising numerous important documents connected with the political history of America
Year: 1864 (1860s)
Authors: Hiatt, James M
Subjects: United States — Politics and government Handbooks, manuals, etc
Publisher: Indianapolis, Asher & Adams
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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wards (1758) Washington commanded theVi inti n another expeditiou against the iort, which termx-na ed succcosfully. At the close of this campaign he left the^vnv -ndwas soon after married to Mrs. Martha Custis, (thewido; r (To . I^aniel Farke Custin,) whose maiden name wasDandrid e and whose intelligent and patriotic conduct, as wifeiLd widovv, will ever be grai.efully remembered in American ^ no .as elected to t.e ^^l^^^^^^^^^lj:;:^^^^^^^^^^to that body, ^vith the e^ceptio.i ^f,^^,=; ^^^af Congre s. His well-tempered zealsent to vepreseut Virem|a J^^^^ .^j^^ ^To .^^g^^rihe most proper means for na- reflignedhis comm^siLon. c^avention which wet at Philadelphia for In May, f ^« j^f „X stitutioii, and was at onco called upon to preside over the purpose of forming a Loistuuuo ^^.^^ adopted by the people, he its deliberations. „^f ^,^ d fi^;^ of the United States for four years; was unanimously ^J^-^f .f^J^;4„^a1niou8ly re-elected for a second term year of his age. JOHN ADAMS. lis

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.lOHN ADAMS, THE SECOND PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, And whose fame as a patriot and statesman is imperishable, wasborn at Braintree, Massachusetts, October 19, 1735. He earlydisplayed superior capacity for learning, and s;raduated at Cam-bridge college with great credit. After qualifying himself for 116 JOHN ADAMS. the Ical profession, he was admitted to practice in 1761, and«oon attained tiiat distinction to which his talents wei^e entitled.From the commencement of the troubles with Great Bntam, in176? he was among the most active in securing the freedom ofh 8 country Bein| elected to the first Continental Congress hot^ok a prominent pUrt in all the war measures that were thenTr^La er and Lbsequently suggested the appointment ofWashington as commander-in-chief df the army. He was oneof the committee which reported the Declaration ol Independ-ence nn76. and the nextyear visited France as -m-issionerto form rt treaty of alliance and commerce with that countiy.Al hough the object h

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