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Image from page 696 of “Our young folks [serial]” (1865)
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Identifier: ouryoungfolksser4112trow
Title: Our young folks [serial]
Year: 1865 (1860s)
Authors: Trowbridge, J. T. (John Townsend), 1827-1916 Hamilton, Gail, 1833-1896 Larcom, Lucy, 1824-1893
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Publisher: [Boston : Ticknor and Fields]
Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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g into water cooler than it-self, it makes the thundering noise of which I spoke. But before it is quitecooled, it pushes and presses for more room, as usual. You know howstrong steam is. It pushes so hard, that it lifts the water that could not quiteboil up higher, where the air does not press so heavily. The steam atomsare as strong as the new air atoms, and they burst out; and the water belowhas a lighter weight to lift. More steam comes in at the bottom of the tube,and lifts the water still higher, where the air is lighter yet, till the steamgrows so strong that it throws the water above it high in the air. See !here goes our little Geyser, and sends the water almost to the ceiling. Is itclear, Mr. Traveller ? Clear as mud, growled the Traveller. It is a beautiful experiment, said the Lord High Fiddlestick, looking as •] Third Lecture on Heat. 663 pink as his slippers with pleasure ; but the credit of it belongs to our wis-est man. We should never have found it out, but for him.

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If he finds out anything like that again, I will have him hung, growledthe King ; that is, if I am obliged to hear about it. Before concluding, said my Lord High Fiddlestick, I have somethingmore to tell you about Heat. When air is heated, it grows larger and lighter.It gets more motion, and it rises. In this way, Heat makes the winds. Thesuns rays strike on the earth, and heat it. The air just above the earth isheated, and, as I have said, it rises. You know that the earth is round, andthat it turns from west to east. Your Majesty remembers, also, that the mid-dle of the earth is called the Tropics ; for when we proposed to your Majestyto settle there, your Majesty answered, that you liked the bananas andoranges, but you objected to the lions and tarantulas. On this happy coun-try of the tarantulas the sun shines straight down. Naturally there theearth and the air are most heated. Our earth is turning around, like a wheel,from west to east, and we keep up a good rate of speed. Where

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Image from page 230 of “The Southern States” (1893)
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Identifier: southernstates1893balt
Title: The Southern States
Year: 1893 (1890s)
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Subjects: Agriculture Industries
Publisher: Baltimore, Manufacturers’ Record Pub. Co
Contributing Library: State Library of North Carolina, Government & Heritage Library
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation

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GREENBRIER WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS IN 1893. tion, both of which he drank up. Withhis means and respectabihty he also losthis good name, literally. From thesonorous William Montague (accent onthe g2ie) it got to be Will Montage,then Bill Tage (pronounce g hard)—and by the time he arrived at the condi-tion of complete vagabondism nothing-was left of his title but Bill Taggs. Mr. Montague, Im glad to see you.Mr. Montague ? Itvasnt Mr. Mon-tague when we used to sit on the samebench at school. I have never foreotten our early friendship, old boy ; how weused to catch flies together and drownkittens. Ah ! those were rare times !and William sighed as if the reminis-cence was too much for him. Ah, Porte! we will never see suchdays again. To think of the windowsweve broken, the bird-nests weverobbed, the hens eggs weve sucked.And then the splendid lies we usedto tell the school-master. You couldbeat us all at that, Porte ; we all knockedunder to you. Many a whopper Pve

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COTTAGES AT GREENBRIER WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS. 238 PIC TURKSO UE VIR GIN!A. borrowed from you to get myself out ofa scrape. My friend, said Crayon with dignity,since I left school I have been about inthe world a great deal, and consequentlyhave but a faint recollection of thematters to which you allude. At any rate youll condescend totake a drink with an old acquaintance. Whos to pay ? said Boniface, look-ing significantly at Mr. Crayon, whoslipped a quarter eagle into his friendshand with delicate adroitness. Id like to know, said Bill, address-ing the landlord with an air of offendeddignity, why do you put that question tome when I ask a gentleman to drink ?Set down your best. Here Mr. Mon-tague flipped his coin on the table withthe air of a millionaire. And when Billasked for the change the landlorddecided to credit it on Bills bill, whorewarded Crayons generosity by pre-tending that Crayon had owed him asmall balance, since, as you will recollectthe night of the big spree, when you

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