A few nice credit rating images I found:

Image from page 216 of “Hardware merchandising January-June 1897” (1897)
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Identifier: hardwaremerjanjun1897toro
Title: Hardware merchandising January-June 1897
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Hardware industry Hardware Implements, utensils, etc Building
Publisher: Toronto :
Contributing Library: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: Algoma University, Trent University, Lakehead University, Laurentian University, Nipissing University, Ryerson University and University of Toronto Libraries

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e course in business methods, andexpect to find compensation in the high sal-aries they will command at home, after it iscompleted. A A A A A A A A.AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA I CAUSES OF FAILURE In the Hardware Trade and How Avoided. As long as there are failures, subjects that furnishinformation how to prevent them will always betimely. We have published, in pamphlet form,three admirable papers on the above topic, in whichOver-Stocking, Expense, Capital, Credit, Dis-counts, Buying, etc., etc., are ably discussed. Wewill mail the whole three essays j ** ^./>ti + oto any address on receipt of I C6FITS | HARDWARE AND METAL. Toronto ♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ WANTADVERTISEMENTS Are inserted in this paper at the rate oftwo cents per word each insertion, pay-able Strictly in advance. Ad-vertisers may have their replies address-ed in our care free of charge, but mustsend stamps for re-addressed letters. Hardware and Metal, Toronto ?I ;;

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The Hamilton BlastFurnace Co., Ltd. C HAMILTONCanada. Manufacturers of HIGH GRADE Of…. pig IHON- w Brushes That Last Our 127 page IllustratedCatalogue B will be useful. Its yours for the asking.Brooms, Brushes, Woodenware. Good bristles go with good brushes. Thebristles dont come out of good brushes easily. Wehave made good brushes for over forty years. We import the raw materials direct. Theydont go through a dozen or more hands before weget them. We stamp our name on every brushthat leaves the factory. This guarantees it. Webox the brushes to keep dirt, dust and moths out. And withal there is an excellent profit in han-dling them. They are quick sellers—and sure—andcertain ones. CHAS. BOECKH £ SONS, Mfrs.^Lsx. SO York St., Toronto. mA A # mA w w # w w w Churchs ALABA5TINE For Use with Cold Water FULLY PROTECTED BY LETTERS PATENT No boiling or hot water needed. 16 beautiful Shades and White. The only article for the purpose, ex-tensively advertised in newspapers. Sold by leadi

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Image from page 350 of “History of Texas; Fort Worth and the Texas northwest edition” (1922)
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Identifier: historyoftexasfo02padd
Title: History of Texas; Fort Worth and the Texas northwest edition
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: Paddock, B. B. (Buckley B.), 1844-1922 Lewis Publishing Company
Subjects:
Publisher: Chicago and New York : The Lewis Publishing Company
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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of population sprang up with the advent of the railways. Cleburne, the county seat, is a modern, progressive city, withwater works, street railway, other public improvements, and a number FORT WORTH AND THE TEXAS NORTHWEST 781 of commercial and manufacturing enterprises. Its largest singleresource is the Santa Fe Railway shops. The population of Cleburnein 1890 was 3,278; in 1900, 7,493; in 1910, 10,364, and in 1920, 12,820.Alvarado, the pioneer town, had a population in 1890 of 1,543; in1900, 1,342; in 1910, 1,155; in 1920, 1,284. Grand Views populationin 1910 was 1,018, having been credited with only about 250 inhabi-tants twenty years before. Other towns are Venus, Rio Vista, Burle-son, Godley, Joshua, Keene, Lillian and Cresson. CleburneCleburne is the county seat of Johnson County and was foundedm 1867, when the county seat was moved from Buchanan, about sixmiles north of Cleburne, and was named in honor of Gen. Patrick Cle-burne, a distinguished officer of the Confederate Army.

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Johnson County Court House, Cleburne Cleburne has a population of 12,820, assessed valuation of ,536,-350, the taxation rate is 89 cents on the 0. It is on the main lineof the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe and the Trinity Brazos Valley rail-ways, and on a branch of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas from Egan,nine miles in length, and has a connection with Fort Worth by theinterurban railway. It is famous for its well equipped schools, modern churches andfine private homes. The court house, postoffice and school buildingsare all modern and substantial structures. There are about twentychurches within the city limits, representing all of the Protestantdenominations, and a small Catholic church. It has a public library,to which Andrew Carnegie contributed ,000, which is a tasteful andornamental structure completed in 1905. It is supported by taxationand now contains about 10,000 volumes, besides magazines and period-icals. The city of Cleburne claims to have the largest school po

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Image from page 155 of “Farm machinery and farm motors” (1908)
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Identifier: farmmachineryfar00davi
Title: Farm machinery and farm motors
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors: Davidson, Jay Brownlee Chase, Leon Wilson
Subjects: Agricultural machinery
Publisher: New York, O. Judd company [etc., etc.]
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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improved by Bell,Hussey, and McCorniick. To Rev. Patrick Bell must be given credit for the reel and side-delivery carrying device. Obed Hussey gave that which is so important, the cutting ap-paratus. For the automatic rake credit must be given to Palmer andWilliams. For a practical hand-binding machine the Marsh brothersshould have the honor. To Spaulding and Appleby the world is indebted for the sizing,packing, and tying mechanisms. Jonathan Haines introduced the header. Many other handy and important details have been added by amultitude of inventors, but all cannot be mentioned. HARVESTING MACHINERY U3 i88. The self-rake reaper.—The modern self-rake re-sembles the early machine very much, and improvementhas taken place only along- the line of detail. The machinehas a platform in the form of a quarter circle, to whichthe grain is reeled l)y tlie rakes, as well as removed toone side far enough to permit the machine to pass on thenext round. The cutting mechanism is like that of the

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FIG. 109—A MODERN SELF-RAKE REAPER harvester. The machine is used to only a limited extentowing to the fact that the grain must be bound by hand.The reaper is preferred by some in the harvesting ofcertain crops, like buckwheat and peas. It is usuallymade in a 5-foot cut, and can be drawn by two horses,cutting six to eight acres a day. MODERN HARVESTER OR BINDER 189, The modern self-binding harvester consists essen-tially of (i) a drive wheel in contact with the ground; 144 FARM MACHINERY (2) gearing to distribute the power from the driver tothe various parts; (3) the cutting mechanism of the ser-rated reciprocating knife, driven by a pitman from a

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