A few nice credit rating images I found:

Image from page 63 of “Forecasting business conditions” (1922)
credit rating
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: cu31924013881515
Title: Forecasting business conditions
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: Gowin, Enoch Burton, 1883-
Subjects: Business
Publisher: New York, American business ass’n
Contributing Library: Cornell University Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
Figure 13: Stock Prices, Bond Prices, and New York Clearings Stocks are represented by average prices of the twenty-two issues most heavily tradedin during a given year. The make-up of this stock average thus varies as speculationshifts from certain issues to others. Bonds are represfcnted by twenty-two industrialissues, selected and averaged in the same way.

Text Appearing After Image:
M ■JM ^^^5^^ Figure 14: The Security Market Curve This curve includes three series—stock prices, bond prices, and New York bank clearings—in its make-up. In preparing it, the statistical methods already described have beenemployed. On account of the way constructed, this curve reflects conditions in the se-curity market very sensitively. The Money Market, and Its Statistical Indices Almost all business and security transactions are carried on by meansof credit. Credit has come to be, in fact, the life blood of commerce. Thecirculation of credit is directed by banks, in part by granting or refusingloans in favor of one customer or business purpose as opposed to another,but more generally, and effectively, through raising or lowering interestrates. CONSTRUCTING THE INDEX 41 In determining when to raise or lower interest rates, and how much,bankers consider carefully, needless to say, the amount of their reserve,the ratio of loans to deposits, and similar items upon which a banks p

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 48 of “The street railway review” (1891)
credit rating
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: streetrailwayrev07amer
Title: The street railway review
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: American Street Railway Association Street Railway Accountants’ Association of America American Railway, Mechanical, and Electrical Association
Subjects: Street-railroads
Publisher: Chicago : Street Railway Review Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
DIRECT CONNECTED UNIT IN ELGIN IOWER STATION. great credit for his persistent efforts in pushing through andsecuring capital for this undertaking, and the soundness ofhis judgment has already been demonstrated by the traffic. The interurban route north of Geneva is owned by theCifipeiitersville, Elgin & Aurora Railway, of which the offi-cers are ). B. Lane, president; D. B. Sherwood, secretary ;and E. D. Waldron, treasurer. It was built last spring, andcnjoNs a line traffic. There are practically two divisions ofthe road, one extending north from Elgin to Dundee andCarpcntcrs illc tlirec miles, the other extending south toSouth Elgin, Coleman, St. Cliailcs and (icnca, telc miles.

Text Appearing After Image:
ANDARl) IlOII.r.RS IN ELIilN IOWER SIATION. ^ticct5^ilWa^5eymV luakiiij; in all tiftcfii mills of vallev supplied hy the roatl. Itis a siufjlc track road, gravel ballasted and laid with T-rails-Si<lc pole cotistruclioii is employed. Through Elgin the(racks of the Elgin City Railway are used. Upon comple-tion of the Aurora & (Jeneva Raikvay to Geneva, nextspring, there will be started a through baggage and expressser ice, for which there will be specially built ecpiipmcnts. The thing of greatest mechanical interest in connectionwith the equipment of this road is the Hall En*ine Coni-|)anys vertical cross compound direct connected engine inthe power house. Its dimensions are 17 and 30 inches by 16-inch stroke, and it runs at 200 revolutions. Its rated horse-power when condensing, is 400. The shaft is extended outon each side to two outboard hearings, ami on each end is aJ^i^-kilowatt General Electric railwa generator. The engineis 14 ft. feet high, 17 feet long and 91^ feet wi

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 1104 of “The Commercial and financial chronicle” (1908)
credit rating
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: supcommercialfina87newy
Title: The Commercial and financial chronicle
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Finance Banks and banking Securities
Publisher: New York, W.B. Dana
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
ERS OF THE NEW YORK, PHILADELPHIA, BOSTON AND BALTIMORE STOCK EXCHANGES Execute Orders on Commission for Purchase and Sale ofStocks, Bonds and all Investment Securities. BILLS OF EXCHANGE BOUGHT AND SOLD Arrangements made with Banks and Bankers in theUnited States enabling them to Issue their own Drafts onForeign Countries. Commercial Letters of Credit and Travelers Letters ofCredit issued, available in all parts of the world. Also Lnternational Cheques. Collections made on all points; Telegraphic Transfers ofMoney made between this country and Europe. Deposit Accounts of American Banks, Bankers, Firms andLndividuals received upon favorable terms. Certificates of Deposit issued payable on demand or at a stated -period. BROWN, SHIPLEY & CO. FOUNDERS COURT, LOTHBURY, E. C. AND FOR THE CONKN1HNCK OF. TRAVELERS, 123 PALL MALL, S. W. LONDON The NATIONALUNION BANKof MARYLAND at Baltimore. 3 and 5 e. Fayette St., Baltimore, Md. Capital, ,000,000 Surplus and Undivided Profits, 0,000

Text Appearing After Image:
WILLIAM WINCHESTER. President ISAAC H. DIXON, Vice-President MILTON B. WILLIAMS. Assistant Cashier DIRECTORS ROBERT A. DIUGS, Cashier Bald- VVM. WINCHESTER, President. ISAAC H. DIXON, of Smith-Dixon Co., WholesalePaper Dealers. WM. A. MARBURG, Capitalist. H. CRAWFORD BLACK, President of the Black,Sheridan & Wilson Co., Wholesale Coal Dealers. R. BRENT KEYSER, President Baltimore CopperSmelting and Rolling Co., President Board of Trus-tees Johns Hopkins University. ROBT. K. WARING, President Central Savings Bank. DANIEL E. CONKLING, Capitalist. EDWIN G. BAETJER, of Venable, Baetjer & Howard,Attorneys-at-Law. Accounts and correspondence solicited.Excellent connections for collecting items on Southern Atlantic Coast Cities and States at rates dependingupon balances maintained by correspondents with us. CLARENCE W. WATSON, President Consolidation CoalCo., President Somerset Coal Co., President FairmountCoal Co. E. STANLEY GARY, of Jas. S. Gary & Son, Manu-facturers of Cotton G

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.