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Image from page 541 of “The history of England, from the accession of James the Second” (1914)
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Identifier: histofengfromthe01macauoft
Title: The history of England, from the accession of James the Second
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Macaulay, Thomas Babington Macaulay, Baron, 1800-1859 Firth, C. H. (Charles Harding), 1857-1936
Subjects: Great Britain — History James II, 1685-1688 Great Britain — History William and Mary, 1689-1702
Publisher: London : Macmillan
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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.For this publication he was now, after the lapse of five years, suddenlytaken up, brought before the Privy Council, committed, tried, convicted,and sentenced to be whipped from Aldgate to Newgate and from New-gate to Tyburn. The wretched man behaved with great effronteryduring the trial ; but, when he heard his doom, he went into agonies of 1 According to Roger North the judges decided that Dangerfield, having been previouslyconvicted of perjury, was incompetent to be a witness of the plot. But this is one among manyinstances of Rogers inaccuracy. It appears, from the report of the trial of Lord Castlemaine inJune 1680, that, after much altercation between counsel, and much consultation among the judgesof the different courts in Westminster Hall, Dangerfield was sworn and suffered to tell his story:but the jury very properly gave no credit to his testimony. A True Relation of ^SENTENCE and CONDEMNATION of Thomas Dangerfield, at the King/ Bench Bar, for bis horrid Crimes andPerjuries.

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TH E Great Myftery of Iniquity being now in a great meafure laid open, and the long Phanatical Vizor tofhrowd their own Hellilh Defigns, under the pretended Danger of Popery and Arbitrary Power, that oldStalecie.tr, that fo lately brought the belt of Monarchs to a Scaffold, and Three Houriihing Kingdoms toConfufion, being now taken off; it has pleafed Heaven to bring the Blackeft of Villains, and Vileft oflmtoftors, thelate infamoully memorable Titus Ores, to fome part of a Punilhment for his molt egregious and unexampled Delu-fions and Perjuries. – And Truth and Reafon beginning to run in their right Channel agab, one of the junior Impsof this fenior Belubub, ■viz.. Thomas Dangerfitld, has been alfo brought to taile the fame Ljli with him.v Now as theres a certain way of Eternizing a Mans Name, as well by the blackeft of Impieties, as the brighieft,, p£ Cerates; and one (ingle Judas (hall be as long remembred, and recorded, as the whole Twelve Apoftles; orWhether one Devil or all

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Image from page 83 of “The progress of the Empire State a work devoted to the historical, financial, industrial, and literary development of New York” (1913)
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Identifier: progressofempire01cona_0
Title: The progress of the Empire State a work devoted to the historical, financial, industrial, and literary development of New York
Year: 1913 (1910s)
Authors: Conant, Charles A. (Charles Arthur), 1861-1915
Subjects:
Publisher: New York : The Progress of the Empire State Company
Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: The Durst Organization

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the votes were cast and counted, and theballots of soldiers in the field were for the first time included.New York electors were recorded for Mr. Lincoln for his sec-ond term. At the same time Reuben E. Fenton was chosengovernor, and he was to be reelected in 1866, and to betransferred in 1869 to the United States Senate. He wasdiligent and sagacious, a master of organization, and wellversed in knowledge of men. The War Department credited New York with 448,850men for the war for the Union sent into the field for periodsfrom three months to three years, and with 18,197 whopaid commutation, or a total of 467,047. Bounties torecruits, paid by the State, counties, and towns, amountedto #86,629,228. Private gifts for the war were on a likescale of munificence. In the presidential election of 1868 New York was not thecontrolling factor that it had often been before and was tobe again. Horatio Seymour counseled his personal friendsthat the Democratic party could hope for success in the can-

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SILAS D. WEBB Came to New York to engage in business in 1857; went toChina in 1865 and remained there for fifteen years engaged mthe Oriental trade with Ameriea. He returned to the UnitedStates in 1880; was for many years vice-president and afterwardspresident of the China and Japan Trading Co. Mr. Webb hasbeen for many years a member of the Chamber of Commerce andthe Merchants Association, in both of which he has served onimportant committees. He is a member of the Executive Com-mittee of the American Asiatic Association and of the DowntownAssociation. PLANTING AND GROWTH OF THE EMPIRE STATE 35 vass only with a candidate who could draw outside support;but the nomination was forced upon him only to verify hisprediction. He carried his own State, but General Grantwas elected. This new President summoned to be Secretaryof State Hamilton Fish, who had been Governor of New Yorkand United States Senator. From 1869 to 1877 at the headof the State Department, he commanded confidence and favo

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