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Image from page 52 of “Suggestive studies of school conditions; an outlined study in school problems for women’s clubs, parent-teacher associations and community organizations” (1916)
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Identifier: suggestivestudie00wisc
Title: Suggestive studies of school conditions; an outlined study in school problems for women’s clubs, parent-teacher associations and community organizations
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors: Wisconsin. Dept. of Public Instruction Aiken, Janet Rankin, 1892-1944
Subjects: Parents’ and teachers’ associations Public schools Education
Publisher: Madison, Wis.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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class, givinga summary of the beginning of three or four interesting story books andsuggesting to the children that these are available in the library for theiruse. After a period of such endeavor, make another book shelf, showingthe percentage of books used, and use this as contrasting data in place ofcomparing poor conditions with the best possible ones as shown in plateXII. Check the teachers use of Lessons on the Use of the School Li-brary in the various grades. Are teachers using this bulletin (publishedby the state department of public instruction)? Can they be induced to doso? Be sure that they use in each grade the work which is outlined asproper for that grade. In looking over the books find the ones which show most signs of wear.Ask the children in the various grades which books they have read in ♦See bulletin Suggestions on Reading in the Grades by Miss Annie Reynolds,issued by the Wisconsin State Department of Public Instruction. The School Library 47 THE SCHOOL LIBRARY

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Out of each 20 books4 are read yearly rrj [^ Why not have them all read? Encourage your children to readGive them school credit for readingProvide interesting books to readRead yourself READING MAKETH A FULL MAN PLATE XII 48 Suggestive Studies of School Conditions the school Hbrar- during the past month or year, and find out from theselists which are the most popular. It is sometimes well to institute a readingcontest between classrooms to see which can report on the greatest numberof books within a year. Pupils may be encouraged to read by individual reports on books read,by a library hour (the hour at the close of the Friday afternoon sessionto be given over to reading and telling stories), by the formation of a read-ing circle (write the Wisconsin Teachers & Young Peoples Reading CircleBoard at Madison, Wisconsin,) by debates on topics of current interest,reports on current events, use of general material in reading lessons peri-odically (abandoning reading textbooks and havin

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Image from page 690 of “The tree book : A popular guide to a knowledge of the trees of North America and to their uses and cultivation” (1920)
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Identifier: treebookpopularg1920roge
Title: The tree book : A popular guide to a knowledge of the trees of North America and to their uses and cultivation
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: Rogers, Julia Ellen, b. 1866
Subjects: Trees
Publisher: New York : Doubleday, Page
Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

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culture in various parts ofNew England, is herewith set down: Average cost of land per acre .00 Average cost of raising seedlings and planting . . 4.84Average taxes at 2 per cent, for 40 years . . . .3.20 Total J12.04 Compounding interest on each item for forty years bringsthe total cost per acre to .99. An average yield is fortycords of box-board timber worth per cord from each acre.This is worth on the stump 0. Deducting the cost, .99, abalance of 9.01 remains as net profit. This is a net annualreturn of .15 per acre, with 4 per cent, compound interest 479 Profitable Tree Planting computed for forty years. Twenty years added greatly increasesthe profits. The New England farmer cannot help the Kansas farmer,except to prove that principles are universal in application. For-estry is not alone for the corporation and the state. It is practic-able also on a limited area, and the smaller the woodlot the moresimple the problem and the more perfectly it may be solved. 480

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Copyright, 1905, by Doubleday, Page & Company FRUIT AND AUTUMN LEAVES OF FLOWERING DOGWOOD (Cornus florida) CHAPTER IV: THE WOODLOT THAT PAYS One might think the farmers woodlot unworthy of mentionin a grave conference over the forest problems which now con-front the American people. Yet a recent census report gives630,000,000 acres of land in farms in the United States. Ofthis, 200,000,000 acres is wooded, almost one-third of the whole. From this vast acreage the farmers get cordwood to burnand to sell. They haul logs to the sawmills and get cash orlumber in return. Telegraph and telephone poles, posts, railroadties, nuts, Christmas trees—all these are sold from the woodlot.Beside fuel and fencing, the farmers get timbers for their barns,sheds and corn cribs. Their wagon tongues, axe handles andwhiffletrees are largely made from sticks of seasoned timber,furnished by the woodlots. If strict account of sales were keptand credit were given for things sold and used at home, the wo

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