A few nice credit score images I found:

Image from page 106 of “Jambalaya [yearbook] 1909” (1909)
credit score
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: jambalayayearboo14edit
Title: Jambalaya [yearbook] 1909
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors: Edited by the Students of Tulane University
Subjects: College Yearbooks New Orleans, Louisiana Tulane University Tulane University–Students–Periodicals
Publisher: Tulane University
Contributing Library: Tulane University, Howard-Tilton Memorial Library and Rudolph Matas Library for the Health Sciences
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
ch one eager, gay, sixteen. As they came with books and tablets, Everything so shining new,Older classmen punched each other, Saying, See the verdant hue? Presently their groans were risingOver Latin, German, Math; Blessing out each college teacher As they strolled up Wisdoms path. Soon their pile of books diminished; Cries were heard, My English—you!All my French is lost completely! My log-book and pencils too! Locker-keys they lost the first week; G vm shoes fled from mortal gaze;A nd it seemed as if things walked off In that golden college haze. The excitement each felt keenly, Joining every College Club:Latin, Banjo, Glee, and others; And the dues—ah, there s the rub! So these maidens toiled and suffered (9),Making more friends every day; Each adoring some grave Senior—Can you blame them, anyway? Do you know them at old NewcomblfThey ve class-spirit strong and right; Each girl loves with true affection Nineteen Twelve, the Red and White. Elizabeth Clarke, Class Poet, 12. 102

Text Appearing After Image:
lElfivNELrRCSHMtN – noT – IC3 Academic Freshman Class History. The Freshman Class came up to Tulane on October ist, and started their bril-liant career by administering a defeat to the Sophs in the wrestling-matches, andshowed that they were right there with the goods. It is to their credit to saythat before evening they were a well-organized body, and had elected officers, andthings began running smoothly for them right away. A few weeks later theFreshmen again proved their supremacy over the Sophomore Class by winningthe tug-of-war; and no longer were the words Freshie and Baby heardaround College. In fact, things were somewhat reversed. In the Freshman-Sophomore game we were defeated by the score of i8 to o; but, this was mainlybecause the Freshmen had had very little experience in this line, and contentedourselves with the fact that our brother class had defeated themselves by thesame score the preceding year In our studies we had the same success as in Athletics, the majority of

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 122 of “Catalog …” (1900)
credit score
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: catalog196364univ
Title: Catalog …
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors: University of Illinois at Chicago. Undergraduate Division University of Illinois at Chicago. Undergraduate Division
Subjects: University of Illinois at Chicago Education, Higher
Publisher: [Chicago, Ill. : Office of Publications Services, The University of Illinois at Chicago]
Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
nd a placement test before registration.The findings of the Health Service and the results of the placement testare used as a basis for prescribing each students program. Studentswith handicapping defects are assigned prescribed activities. Studentswith low placement scores are assigned to basic physical fitnesscourses. Students who are organically sound and demonstrate a fairdegree of motor fitness are permitted to elect from a variety of activitycourses. All general courses in physical education meet three times aweek for one hour or two times a week for one and one-half hours. Allnon-professional courses in physical education carry one hour credit. Men entering the University with less than sixty semester hourscredit are required to secure four semesters credit in physical educa-tion, including the amount transferred. In addition to a basic physicalfitness program, men are offered instruction in volleyball, badminton,swimming, individual tumbling, double tumbling, apparatus stunts,

Text Appearing After Image:
Physical Education class—apparatus.121 boxing, wrestling, weight lifting, archery, boating and fishing, basket-ball, back yard sports, personal defense activities, individual athletics,and intercollegiate and intramural athletics. Veterans who have fulfilled the physical education requirementwhile in the service are exempt from taking physical education. Vet-erans are encouraged to utilize the physical education facilities, butadditional credit will not be granted except as elective credit in theCollege of Business Administration. Women entering the University as freshmen are required to obtainfour semesters credit in physical education; those entering the Univer-sity with sophomore standing are required to obtain credit for twosemesters of physical education. Women are offered instruction inelementary and intermediate rhythms, ballroom dance, speedball,modified activities, basketball, volleyball, softball, badminton, tum-bling, apparatus stunts, fundamentals of motor fitness, arche

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 769 of “Story of the Sherman brigade.The camp, the march, the bivouac, the battle; and how “the boys” lived and died during four years of active field service…” (1897)
credit score
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: StoryOfTheShermanBrigade.theCampTheMarchTheBivouacTheBattleAnd
Title: www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/book…
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Hinman, Wilbur F
Subjects: Sherman-brigade United States-History-Civil War-1861-1865 Regimental histories Ohio Militia
Publisher: Alliance, O. The author

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
with the dance!was the cry. The fiddlers struck up a lively tune and the ruc-tion was over. The revelry continued until daylight. Our boys tools girls behind them upon their horses,and in this way went home withthem. Part of them stayed twoor three days in the neighbor-hood, and were in high feather.There was plenty of musicin our Texas camps. Everyregiment had scores of menwho could sing, and ours werenot exceptions. Solos, quar-tets and choruses were oftenrendered in a style that wouldhave done credit to trained vo-calists. There were several fid-dles and men who could playthem—perhaps not in the style of Ole Bull or Remenyi, buttheir audiences were not critical—and the music was all-sufficientfor the stag-dances that were so common. There was a guitarin the Sixty-fifth, which had escaped all the perils of campaign-ing for more than two years. Many will remember the frequentvisits of Dr. Wheeler, of one of the Illinois regiments, who usedto play the guitar and sing by the hour.

Text Appearing After Image:
HUGH P. ANDERSON, SURGEON, SIXTY-FOURTH. 1865.] CHAPTKR LXVII. LAST DAYS OF OUR SERVICE, asure Trips to Lavaca—A Naval Catastrophe—Officers ata Negro Ball—Watching for the Muster-out Order cap-tain Charley Bakers Story—The Fifty-First IllinoisGOES Home, which Gives us Hope—Camp Sherman—TexasNorthers —A Wrecked and Deluged Camp—Major orlowSmith and His Pipe—Lieutenant Kanels Joke—Promotionsthat Did not Promote. HEAT and mosquitoes combined to make our existence atCamp Irwin almost insupportable. The daily round be-came monotonous in the extreme. Occasional reliefwas found in excursions to the Guadalupe river, and toLavaca, which was our watering place—a sort of Saratoga.Leaves of absence from camp for two or three days could usuallybe had for the asking. Small parties frequently went to Lavacato sail and bathe and fish and gather oysters. On one of thesetrips, in which the writer was a participant, General Stanley andGeneral Conrad were met at Lavaca, on pleasure

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.