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Image from page 153 of “The street railway review” (1891)
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Identifier: streetrailwayrev10amer
Title: The street railway review
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: American Street Railway Association Street Railway Accountants’ Association of America American Railway, Mechanical, and Electrical Association
Subjects: Street-railroads
Publisher: Chicago : Street Railway Review Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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FIG. 6-TR0I,LEY STAND.^RD. Mr. I. E. Winslow deserves much credit for the pioneer work hehas done in constructing this road. He is one of the engineers inEngland who does not befriend side trolley wire and the swivel

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FIG. 7—.SECTION OF tAK WHEEL. trolley wheel and stand, and if the reports that come from someroads using the swivel trolley and side wire system are true, hecertainly has good grounds for the position he takes. Mr. R. T.Whitehead is resident engineer and manager of the system. The Cleveland Electric Ry. has let the contract for an additionto its Cedar Ave. power house and will install a l,6oo-kw. unit. The Consolidated Street Railway Co., of Worcester, Mass., takesan active interest in the welfare of its men and has arranged anumber of pleasant concerts and entertainments for their benefit.It also permits sacred services to be held Sunday mornings, atthe car barn, and which are conducted by pastors from the diflferentchurches in the city. Mr. A. H. Holmes, president of the Metropolitan Street RailwayCo., of Kansas City, is making preparations for handling thecrowds which will be at the city during the Democratic conventionin July next. The company has had much experience with crowd

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Image from page 57 of “A half century of Minnesota as territory and state; a concise account of the principal events in the period of discovery, exploration, and settlement, and during the half century of territorial and state government” (1900)
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Identifier: halfcenturyofmin01huds
Title: A half century of Minnesota as territory and state; a concise account of the principal events in the period of discovery, exploration, and settlement, and during the half century of territorial and state government
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors: Hudson, Horace B[ushnell] [from old catalog]
Subjects:
Publisher: [Minneapolis, Minn., The Minneapolis journal]
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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Popular Route To. PHir* A riO and all EASTERN POINTS. Connecting: withV-.1 li.^J-^J^ ^j^g ^^^ York and Boston Special. (No change of Depots.) ST LOUIS ^^^ Points Southeast and Southwest. OnlySleeping: Car Line. DES MOINES ^^^^ Omaha, Salt Lake, San Francisco,^ lVl>^li N J-ikj j^^^ Angeles, San Diego. Standard and Compartn^cnt Sleepers Through Tourist cars to Los Angeles, California, Tuesdays via Fort Worth and El Paso, The Sunny Southern Route, Thursdays via Colorado Springs, Salt Lake City and Ogden, The Scenic Route. For particulars address W. L HATHAWAY, City Ticket Agent. No. I Nicollet House Block. Minneapolis.F. P. RUTHERFORD. City Ticket Agent, – – 396 Robert Street, St. Paul. orA. B. CUTTS, General Passenger and Ticket Agent, – – Minneapolis, Minn. So00-000«-»OKK>0000^

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A HALF CENTURY OF MIXXESOTA. building industry has already grown upunder the stimulus of the commerce ofthe great lakes. In late years variouslines of manufacture have developed in re-sponse to modern conditions. Instancesare the beet sugar manufacture, the mak-ing of creamery supplies, the construction(if electrical machinery. While the list ofMinnesota manufactures is so long as toseem to leave nothing out, there remainnnny industries which are not represented:ind to which the state is admirablj- adapt-ed. In i85o it was reported that Minnesotahad 562 manufacturing establishments,with an invested capital of ,388,310. Thecensus of 1870 announced 2,270 establish-ments with a capital of about ,000,000and a product worth over ,000,000. In1880 the census credited the state with3,4q3 manufacturing places, utilizing acapital of ,000,000 and turning out ,-000,000 worth of goods: while in 1890 there DO YOUI SEE THAT BAG? ! It means that ourI STERLING grade of• seed represents

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