A few nice credit repair images I found:

Image from page 214 of “Birds of North Carolina” (1919)
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Identifier: birdsofnorthcaro00pear
Title: Birds of North Carolina
Year: 1919 (1910s)
Authors: Pearson, T. Gilbert (Thomas Gilbert), 1873-1943 Brimley, Clement Samuel, 1863-1946 Brimley, Herbert Hutchinson, 1861-1946
Subjects: Birds
Publisher: Raleigh, Edwards & Broughton printing co., state printers
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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land that is o])eiud to cultivation, the greater has been the increase of theQuail. Wherever field peas or grain is grown, there Bob-white repairs, the stray seedfrom the farmers crops seeming to be much to his taste. He is credited withdestroying chinch bugs, grasslio])pcrs, boll weevils, striped cucumber beetles, andother injurious insects, and with varying his diet in winter with the seeds of manyweeds which vex the farm lands. His game qualities often enable the farmer tolease the shooting privileges ot his lantl for enough, or more than enough, to paythe taxes. It nests both early and late, and sometimes a l)rood almost grown may be foundon November 1.) (the ustitd oi)cning day for shooting in the State), a.ssociate(l witha brood of little squealers only just able to fly. The full comi)lcment of eggs is from ten to eighteen; sometimes more are found,but such extraordinary sets are probably the result of two hens occupying the samenest. The ])rincipal laying month is May. aOa kXH

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Descriptive List 153 The name Bob-white comes from the loud and clear two-noted whistle of themale in the nesting season, when this most musical and far-reaching call may beheard a long distance on a still day. When a covey has been scattered, a rallyingcall of three notes is used. These latter are the calls most familiar to the hunter. 25. FAMILY TETRAONID/E. GROUSE This family is composed of birds nearly allied to the preceding family, butusually of greater size and more northern range. They may be distinguished byhaving the tarsus and nasal fossse feathered, instead of naked as in the Bob-whites. Genus Bonasa (Steph.)137. Bonasa umbellus umbellus {Linn.). Ruffed Geouse, Pheasant. Description.—Head crested, fitles of iicek with a ruff of soft dark feathers; upperparts variedwith black, brown and gray, tail dusky with several narrow bands of black, a broad subterniinalband of black, and a terminal one of grayish; lower parts whitish or buffy, marked with broadbars of brown. Female

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Image from page 104 of “Old naval days; sketches from the life of Rear Admiral William Radford, U. S. N.” (1920)
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Identifier: oldnavaldayssket00meis
Title: Old naval days; sketches from the life of Rear Admiral William Radford, U. S. N.
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: Meissner, Sophie Radford de
Subjects: Radford, William, 1809-1890 United States — History, Naval
Publisher: New York : H. Holt and company
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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after the first broad-side had been fired. His ship was hulled a number of times be-tween wind and water, five carronades had broken loose, muchof the rigging was gone, the main and mizzen-masts were indanger of falling over the side, and many of his men were dis-abled. Perceiving that the Cyane had struck. Captain Douglas at-tempted to run, but it was too late. His wheel had been shotaway, and his lower masts had been badly injured. After achase of half an hour he surrendered, and Lieutenant Ballardwas sent to take possession. Lieutenant Hoffman was already onboard the Cyane with a small crew. This battle is noted for the splendid seamanship of theAmericans and the gallant behavior of the English. CaptainStewart had succeeded, by running and backing from one shipto the other, in fighting each separately, and in preventing hisown ship from being raked. There is nothing finer in ourannals. This was the last great fight of the Old Ironsides, as it wasthe last frigate action of the war.

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OLD IRONSIDES 8i The success of the War of 1812 cannot be credited to onefrigate, yet the Constitution absorbed the largest amount of at-tention as she did by far the greatest damage to British armedships upon the sea. Being in need of extensive repairs, the old frigate underwenta period of enforced idleness, lasting about six years, sailingagain in May, 1821, under command of Capt. Jacob Jones forservice as flagship of the Mediterranean Squadron. It was dur-ing this cruise, in 1822, that Lord Byron paid her a visit. In the fall of 1823, the Constitution was back in Boston for anew crew, sailing in October, 1824, under Capt. Thomas Mac-donough, to join the Mediterranean Squadron, then shortly to becommanded by Commodore John Rodgers, whose strong handand rigid discipline would, the Secretary of the Navy was con-vinced, restore the moral tone and put an end to the brawlsand fighting of duels, as well as to the general dissipation thenrife amongst the officers of the Mediterranean fleet

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Image from page 84 of “Marshall County in the World War, 1917-1918 : a pictorial history of the community’s participation in all wartime activities with a complete roster of soldiers and sailors in service” (1919)
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Identifier: marshallcountyin01whit
Title: Marshall County in the World War, 1917-1918 : a pictorial history of the community’s participation in all wartime activities with a complete roster of soldiers and sailors in service
Year: 1919 (1910s)
Authors: Whitacre, Joseph A Moore, W. J
Subjects: World War, 1914-1918
Publisher: [Marshalltown? Iowa] : J.A. Whitacre and W.J. Moore
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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thick we could not see anything. We could heara plenty, though, because many of the mines went ofi^ as soon as the saltwater melted away the last safety precaution. The destroyers beat it for home on this first expedition and we wereleft to our own resources. Twice during that night we almost collidedwith ships but got away clean. We made thirteen mine-laying trips and all contained exciting inci-dents, returning each time to Inverness, where Naval Base No. 18 islocated. After one trip we went down to Newcastle-on-tyne, England, andwent into dry dock for repairs and some big feeds. After one week therewe came back to Invergordon and it certainly seemed dead. Well, without giving details, we have fourteen big stars painted onthe head of our pilot, representing fourteen German submarines destroyedor captured, credited to the Shawmut. The survey ship came in yesterday and I understand we are going tohave seventeen stars on our Thanksgiving menu — some Thanksgivingparty. Page Eighty-two

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MRS. A. C. BURGESS(Red Cross) ^r

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