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Image from page 133 of “Statistical studies in the New York money-market; preceded by a brief analysis under the theory of money and credit, with statistical tables, diagrams and folding chart” (1902)
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Identifier: statisticalstudi00nort
Title: Statistical studies in the New York money-market; preceded by a brief analysis under the theory of money and credit, with statistical tables, diagrams and folding chart
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Norton, John Pease, 1877-
Subjects: New York Stock Exchange Credit Money
Publisher: New York, MacMillan
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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Expressed as 19$ and 4.7$, the latter isabout 1/4 of the former and 4: 1 makes a convenient scale forplotting. The absolute scale in millions of dollars at the present timeis easily found. The amplitudes are proportionate 4: 1. Thegrowth funds are proportionate 1:3. Consequently reducingthe scale of the plot of the loans to 1:3, we should have acomparison in actual figures. For January 7, 1901, themillion dollar amplitude of the reserves is roughly fortymillions of dollars, and for the loans about thirty millionsof dollars. It follows that the dynamic element of the loansis of far greater importance than the dynamic element of thereserves compared with their relative periodicities. The tradition of probably higher money rates for the lastweeks of December is also expressed in this chart. The risein the loans during the last two weeks of December is muchmore rapid than in the reserves. The result is, the ratio ofreserves to deposits is diminished, and high discount rates arethe result.

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Image from page 121 of “Credits and collections:” (1920)
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Identifier: creditscollectio00skin
Title: Credits and collections:
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: Skinner, Edward M White, Reuben Stratin, b. 1860 Kramer, Horace Elliot, 1878-
Subjects: Credit Collecting of accounts
Publisher: Chicago : La Salle Extension University
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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s department. There is then leftonly those inquiries and orders for which there are nocredit files. John Browns letter is one of them. Weshall now follow the course of this letter, it being under-stood that all of the other papers are following asomewhat similar course. The Inquiry Caed First the credit man makes out what is known as aninquiry card (see Figure 14), which is printed onyellow paper. At this time he merely puts in the name,address, material, and date, and crosses out the wordorder, showing that this card represents an inquiry. 92 Credits He then takes the inquiry card to the commercial agencyrating books. You will note that a space is provided onthe left-hand side under ratings for the insertion ofthe figures as given by the rating books. In this case,we have seen that Brown is just starting in businessand, therefore, is not rated; so we write the word noneafter the letters B and D. However, supposingthat Bradstreet had offered a rating of ,000 to ,000, Date ^0//S N

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^^—» (Stenographer. Write these reference*) Fig. 14.—Inquiry Card (Yellow) first-grade credit, we should have to put the number 5immediately after the letter B and the number 10 inthe next open space following the oblique line, and thenumber 1 after the dash. As we have seen, however, thiscustomer was not rated and the credit man, therefore,takes the card back to his desk to decide what actionshould be taken. He decides that in view of the circumstances, it will besatisfactory to write the customer direct for information. Actual Procedure 93 SMITH COAL COMPANY Chicago, IllinoisMr. John Brown, October 21, 1915 Chicago, lUinois.Dear Sir: Your letter of inquiry dated March 9 has been referred to meby our sales manager for credit approval. We have institutedour regular credit investigation, and have written the referencesthat you were good enough to give us. We note that you have orders on hand for domestic fuel andassume, therefore, that you will want rush shipment. This beingthe ca

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