Some cool annual credit report images:

Image from page 326 of “Annual report of the Regents” (1889)
annual credit report
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: annualreporto441891newy
Title: Annual report of the Regents
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: New York State Museum University of the State of New York. Board of Regents
Subjects: New York State Museum Science
Publisher: Albany : J.B. Lyon, State Printer
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. 24.—The seventeen-year Cicada — Cicada sbptendecim: a, the pupa; 6, the pupa case; c, the mature insect. are recognized as occupying some part of the territory of the State of New York. The years of their appearance are so well known to entomologists, and by them usually announced in advance through the public press, that the event is always looked forward to with no little interest. The Periodical Cicada at Tivoli, N. Y., in 1890. The present year, 1890, is not one of the New York cicada years.When, therefore, the announcement was made of the appearance ofthe insect at a locality on the Hudson river, where it was not dueuntil 1894, it could hardly be credited, and it was naturally questionedif some other species bad not been mistaken for it, notwithstandingthe authoritative source from which the information came. Mr. Frederick Clarkson, of New York city, wrote me on June 7th,from Tivoli-on-Hudson, that he had that day captured on the piazza 298 Forty-fourth Report on the Sta

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 520 of “Annual report” (1902)
annual credit report
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: annualreport671913newy
Title: Annual report
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: New York State Museum
Subjects: New York State Museum Science Science
Publisher: Albany : University of the State of New York
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
Fig. 2 Kernels of corneaten by European grainmoth (enlarged, original)

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. 3 Cocoon massesand exuviae of Europeangrain moth (enlarged, orig-inal) with brownish, gnawed particles. The light brown pupae, prior tothe disclosure of the adult, work about half way out of the masses,and one may frequently see such a mass with ten to fifteen or twentypupal cases. The groups of cocoons may be so abundant as fairlyto plaster considerable areas of adjacent walls. Life history and habits. This insect is generally credited inEurope with producing two broods annually. The females aresaid to deposit thirty or more eggs on various grains, the youngcaterpillars entering the kernels and, in the case of corn, displayinga marked preference for the softer and more nutritious germ. Theindividual caterpillars may attack several grains and seriously injureor spoil as many as twenty. On attaining maturity they forsake thegrain, spin cocoons in masses as described above, and, in the case 18 NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM of the fall brood, winter in such retreats, the moths appearing ine

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 232 of “Annual report” (1902)
annual credit report
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: annualreport101112190newy
Title: Annual report
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: New York (State). Forest, Fish and Game Commission
Subjects: Forests and forestry Fisheries Game and game-birds
Publisher: [Albany, N.Y. : The Commission]
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
d not be kept up to as high astandard as private property would be, and there are very many reasonswhy every dollar asked for the improvement and enlargement of thesehatcheries should be given. If the Legislature would, as has been manytimes suggested, send a committee to look into the hatcheries and theirwork, and to note the increasing demands made upon them, there wouldbe no doubt as to the result of an application on the part of this Commis-sion for funds for hatchery purposes. The distribution of fish during the year just closed has been far greaterthan ever before. A total of 225,909,360 food fish have been raised anddistributed, as compared with a total of 164,930,400 during the previousyear. At the same time, the total output of game fish has been 9,764,900as compared with 6,540,620 the year before. The very substantial increasein each case is at once apparent. This great increase is in part due to enlarged facilities made possible by the increased appropriations furnished 172

Text Appearing After Image:
(/) CD z UJ I0 V) D u DJ Id0Z 0J< 0) < TWELFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF FOREST, FISH AND GAME COMMISSIONER. I 73 in response to your urgent request a year ago, and in part also to thebenefits derived from the scientific management applied to the hatch-eries by the State Fish Culturist, Dr. Tarleton H. Bean. To him is duethe credit of preventing any considerable loss among the fish from theusual diseases which prevail in hatcheries, and which have in the past inmany cases very seriously reduced the stock we have had available fordistribution. From many localities reports have come which indicate not only satis-factory, but in some cases, surprising results derived from stocking depletedwaters. One notable instance is found in the St. Lawrence river, wherethe supply of maskalonge had been decreasing for several years to the greatdissatisfaction of the thousands of visitors to this favorite vacation region.The work of restocking this river was taken up vigorously by the Com-mission with th

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.