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Image from page 287 of “The Gardeners’ Chronicle : a weekly illustrated journal of horticulture and allied subjects” (1895)
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Identifier: gardenerschronic0318gard
Title: The Gardeners’ Chronicle : a weekly illustrated journal of horticulture and allied subjects
Year: 1895 (1890s)
Authors: Gardeners’ chronicle (London, England : 1874)
Subjects: Ornamental horticulture Horticulture Plants, ornamental
Publisher: London: [Gardeners’ Chronicle]
Contributing Library: Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, McLean Library
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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entaccount of the plants and gardens of the CanaryIslands, a substantial addition to our knowledge.The Journal reflects credit on the Society, andsecures for the country Fellows a return for theirsubscription that they would not otherwise obtain. Devonshire Technical Instruction Com-mittee.—Mr. Chas. Bebby, horticultural lecturer tothe East Suffolk County Council Technical Instruc-tion Committee, has been appointed instructor ofhorticulture by the Devonshire County Counci, andwill enter upon his duties at the end of the month. National Chrysanthemum Society.— A meeting of the general committee took place onthe 26th ult., Mr. B. Wynne in the chair. TheSecretary, having announced the death of Mr.Aethdb Wobtley, who in the early days of the oldStoke Newington Chrysanthemum Society had filledthe office of Secretary, the following resolution wasunanimously passed:— That this committee placeson record an expression of the sorrow with which ithas heard of the recent death of Mr. Abthcb

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~H?TEMBEB 7, 1895.] THE GARDENERS CHRONICLE 271 Wohtlet, formerly Secretary of the Stoke Newirjg-ton Chrysanthemum Society, to which office he waaelected in 1851, and bears in grateful remembrancehis services to the Society, and to the Chrysanthe-mum in that capacity, and bIbo as an old cultivatorand exhibitor of the golden flower. It wasfurther resolved that a copy of this resolution be sentto the relatives of Mr. Abthob Woetlet. Mr. Geo.Walkeb, Paddington, and Mr. W. A. Holmes,son of the late Secretary to the Society, wereeltcted to vacancies on the general committee ; andMr. J. McHattie, The Gardens, Strathfieldsaye, toa vacancy on the Floral Committee. A schedulerevision sub-committee was appointed to revise theschedules of prizes for September, October, andDecember. The Jubilee celebration sub-committee,appointed to prepare a scheme for the proper cele-bration of the Jubilee of the Society in 1896, madea report, and the same was accepted, a committeebeing appointed to carry out t

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Image from page 261 of “The Mark Lane express, agricultural journal &c” (1832)
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Identifier: marklaneexpressa9319unse
Title: The Mark Lane express, agricultural journal &c
Year: 1832 (1830s)
Authors:
Subjects: Agriculture Farm produce Farm produce
Publisher: London : Isaac Alger
Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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h wethers and choice aged bullocke,slaughtered in the establishment, said, Wethink the beef and mutton you kill is too young;it has not the flavour of our own fed wethers andbullocks. There may be something in this. In-deed, I believe it is generally acknowledged byall gourmands that two-year-old wether sheep artethe ripest and richest mutton. May not the samoobtain in cattle ? Transactions in Store Stock. (Reported to the Department of Ar/ricnlturc andTechnical Instruction for Ireland.) known sires as Silvercup, Airies Prince, LordStewart, Marcellus, Marmion, Montravc,Ronald, and Carthusian. All are big-sizedsound horses, well adapted for mating withthe native Italian mares with the view of im-proving the breed. Thirteen of them are two-year-olds, the others between three and fiveyears, and include the well-known prizehorses, Crathorne and Chamberlain. Alto-gether the selection is one which does Mr.Ranucci much credit, and it is to be hopedthey will reach their destination in safety.

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Notes a id Jottings. The generally showery weaLher that has pre-vailed since the second week of the month has hadthe effect of refreshing pastures very much, thoughit is scarcely likely, except on the very bestland, and where lightly stocked, that grass willbecome at all abundant over the greater part ofEngland. From reports, too, Ireland appearsto be somewhat in the same condition. Rootcrops of all kinds, however, are improvingamazingly, and with a mild autumn may yetmake bulky crops; straw, too, is bulky enough,especially wheat straw, so thSi we may hope,with these prospects and a fair stock of old hayin the hands of many farmers, the winter willnot be so severely hard to face, though it maybe bad enough. A little help early is a grandthing for all classes of cattle except those thatare intended to remain in the fields all winteras scavengers. At the Tring show which was held duringBank Holiday week, the milk and butter testswere a very* important feature of the proceed-ings, and th

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Image from web page 7 of “The US Legion Weekly [Volume 4, No. 14 (April 7, 1922)]” (1922)
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Identifier: americanlegionwe414amer
Title: The American Legion Weekly [Volume 4, No. 14 (April 7, 1922)]
12 Months: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: American Legion. National Headquarters
Topics: American Legion periodicals
Publisher: American Legion
Contributing Library: The American Legion Nationwide Headquarters Library
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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Horatius gets credit for the bridge-holding Casabianca features perpetuated his title together with purple chevron. And it also oper-ates from the strong competition ofnumerous counter tourist attractions. A citypost, or club, or lodge that remainsalive has cause of its vitality. The tiny town post might need nopress broker because every individualmember is his very own press agent. Butthe big city post that doesn’t knowthe utilizes of promotion speedily finds thatit is composed of a commander, an adju-tant, and some vacant chairs.The films are way too close at hand andthe cabaret just about to happen prom-ises a lot better than the report of this com-mittee on finance. In virtually every town there is at leastone newspaper which offers a columnat reported periods for publicationof American Legion development. Take itfrom the editors of those departments,despite laige variety of articles and ex-tensive memberships, it will always be alarge task to get sufficient development to fill thecolumn. Lots of post comes to the editor.Most from it get a hold of

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Image from page 373 of “yearly report of administrators regarding the Wabash Railroad Co., for the fiscal 12 months closing ..” (1890)
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Identifier: annualreportofdi18991906waba
Title: Yearly report of directors for the Wabash Railroad Co., for financial year ending ..
Year: 1890 (1890s)
Writers: Wabash Railroad
Topics: Wabash Railroad Railroads
Publisher: St. Louis : Woodward & Tiernan Print. Co.
Adding Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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,068 80 Cost Of Road & gear (1) 5,335,419 36 3,882,500 00[ ,452,919 36Supplies and products readily available CashonHand Investments in shares and Bonds (2) Sundry Accounts Collectible-Due from Agents From U. S., Carrying Mails.. Pacific Express Co Sundry Railroads and Indi-viduals BUls Receivable Advances Quick Freight Lines Account Working Fund Advances on Account real-estate in St. Louis Miscellaneous (3) 1,244,803 46987,034 96 1,553,020 34 520,891 43179,975 7961,621 59 613,497 2053,239 27 43,004 74 29,120 8843,593 41 2,834,91174;., 61,364 27 5,031 64 399,135 85 LIABILITIES. Typical Stock Preferred Stock Bonds (4) Interest because of Interest Accrued, not Due Dividends Debenture Bonds,Series A due Sundry Accounts Payable-Vouchers and Pay Rolls Sundry Railroads and Indi-viduals Taxes Accrued, perhaps not because of Hospital Account Bills Payable-Notes Payable Equipment Notes of LongDate (5) profits purchase DebentureBonds, Series B gear Fund Account Miscellaneous Balance to credit, Profit andLoss

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a) Boost is because of price of new Terminals in St. Louis, ,527,000.00; less GoldEquipment sinking-fund Bonds retired, 0,000.00. (21 Boost is due to financial investment in Capital Stock associated with Wabash-PittsburghTerminal Ry., ,000,000.00, and First Mortgage Bonds associated with the Wabash-PittsburghTerminal Ry., ,154,000.00. (3) Boost is a result of amounts held in anticipation because of buy ofnew equipment. (4) Increase is because of problem of Wabash R. R. very first Lien ipercent Terminal GoldBonds, SI.664,000.00; Wabash R. R. Gear Gold Bonds Series The, 0,000.00;Wabash R.R. temporary 59^ Collateral Notes, ,160,000.00; less Gold EquipmentSinking Fund Bonds retired, 0,000.00. (5) See Note 3. —47— THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. Operating Expenses—Year Ending Summer 30, 1904. UPKEEP OF Method AND STRUCTURES. Year endingJune 30,1904. Year endingJune 30,1903. ,950,007 26 188,963 21 421,804 69 522,933 43 114,243 15 421,079 68 7,364 43 51,332 82 3,104 67 774 66 ,672,302 45 Renewals of Rails

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Image from page 293 of “Annual report of the Public Service Commission, and the … annual report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners” (1914)

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Image from page 293 of “Annual report of the Public Service Commission, and the … annual report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners” (1914)
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Identifier: annualreportofpu19162mass
Title: Annual report of the Public Service Commission, and the … annual report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Massachusetts. Public Service Commission Massachusetts. Board of Railroad Commissioners. Annual report
Subjects: Massachusetts. Public Service Commission Public utilities
Publisher: Boston : Wright & Potter Printing Co.
Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

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Total Taxes paid during Year and charged Directly or Indirectly to Income. Amount of Taxes in Litigation at Close of Year. Nantucket Railroad Company, 41 41 Miscellaneous Items in Profit and Loss Account for the Year. Item. Credits. Allowance on bills payable, 8 90 Road operated at Close of Year. Name of Road or Track. Termini between which Roadnamed extends. Miles ofRoad. AJl Other Main Tracks. Total. Nantucket R.R. Co., . Nantucket to Siasconset, . 9.12 .15 9.27 Miscellaneous Characteristics of Road.Gage of Track and Weight of Rail. Gage of Track. Weight of Rail per Yard (Pounds). Miles ofMain Track. Three feet 40 9.12 Grade Crossings. Description. With Streets, Avenues and Highways. Protected by flagmen alone, part time only, Unprotected, 3 10 Total 13 290 RAILROAD RETURNS. [Jan. Classification of Respondents Locomotive and Car Equipment.Equipment owned or leased in Service of the Respondent. Class of Equipment. Unitsavailable for Service at Close of Year (fully owned).

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Steam locomotives, ….. Freight-Train Cabs.Flat cars, Passenger-Train Cars. Coaches, Combination passenger cars, All classes of passenger-train cars. Ties laid in Replacement and in Bettebment. Cross Tibs. Switch and BridgeTies. Kind of Ties. TotalNumberof Tiesapplied. Average Cost per Tie at Dis-tributing Point. Numberof Feet(BoardMeasure)applied. AverageCost per MFeet (BoardMeasure) at Dis-tributing Point. Amount charged to Operating Expenses. Untreated chestnut, . 3,445

Image from page 171 of “REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, ONTARIO, 1909” (1910)
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Identifier: reportofminister1909onta
Title: REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, ONTARIO, 1909
Year: 1910 (1910s)
Authors: Ontario. Dept. of Education Ontario. Ministry of Education ONTARIO. DEPT. OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Subjects:
Publisher:
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Guelph, University of Windsor, York University and University of Toronto Libraries

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rom the Brantford Courier, June 15th, 1909.) The music hall of the Ontario Institution for the Blind was filled to over-flowing last evening, the occasion being the closing concert of the session, and not-withstanding the length of the programme standing room in the aisles and adjacentcorridors was at a premium until the end of the last number. Principal Gardinerexplained that, as an ample synopsis of the story of Joan of Arc would be foundon the ink-print and point-print programmes, no verbal explanations were required,hence it was possible to begin the work of the evening promptly. Charles Duff,who lives at Banda, but is now very well known in Brantford musical circles,opened the programme with Rheinbergers Pastorale Sonata on the organ andafterwards played Wieniawskis Valse on the piano, besides taking part withLouise Deschenes in Dvoraks Duo, Slavonic Dances. Miss Deschenes also gavean organ number, Guilmants Elevation, and Thomas Kennedy played Liszts 130 THE REPORT OF THE No. 16

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–, 3 o 1909 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION. 137 Liebestraum No. 3 on the piano. Richard Henderson sang Piccolominis Orapro Nobis, and the closing number of the first part of the programme wasTschaikowskys March e MiJitaire on two pianos by dean Chatelain, HaroldElnor, Charles McBride and Clifford Patterson. At the request of the Principal, Dr. Torrington of the Toronto College ofMusic, presented diplomas to Louise Deschenes for piano and to Thomas Kennedyfor piano and vocal music, complimenting the graduates on the accuracy of theirwork, which, he said, reflected credit upon themselves and their teachers. W. S.Brewster, M.P.P., in a pleasant speech, presented the College testimonials to LouiseDeschenes (third year piano, first class honours), Louise Deschenes (first year-organ, first class honours), Eva Johnson (first year theory, honours), EthelMcQuade (second year piano, first class honours), Ethel McQuade (first year theory,first class honours) ; and Rev. Mr. Wright, of St. Judes, with a

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39 20,670 00 Sl,349 64 Statistics of Rail Line Operations. Item. Average mileage of road operated (miles), Tbain-Miles.Passenger, . . . . Locomotive-Miles.Passenger, principal, ………. Car-Miles.Passenger train, passenger, ……… Freight Service.Tons, revenue freight, ………. Ton-miles, revenue freight, ……… Passenger Service.Passengers carried, revenue, ……… Passenger-miles, revenue, ……… Revenues and Expenses.Freight revenue, ……….. Passenger revenue, Passenger service train re

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Image from page 153 of “The street railway review” (1891)
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Identifier: streetrailwayrev10amer
Title: The street railway review
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: American Street Railway Association Street Railway Accountants’ Association of America American Railway, Mechanical, and Electrical Association
Subjects: Street-railroads
Publisher: Chicago : Street Railway Review Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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FIG. 6-TR0I,LEY STAND.^RD. Mr. I. E. Winslow deserves much credit for the pioneer work hehas done in constructing this road. He is one of the engineers inEngland who does not befriend side trolley wire and the swivel

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FIG. 7—.SECTION OF tAK WHEEL. trolley wheel and stand, and if the reports that come from someroads using the swivel trolley and side wire system are true, hecertainly has good grounds for the position he takes. Mr. R. T.Whitehead is resident engineer and manager of the system. The Cleveland Electric Ry. has let the contract for an additionto its Cedar Ave. power house and will install a l,6oo-kw. unit. The Consolidated Street Railway Co., of Worcester, Mass., takesan active interest in the welfare of its men and has arranged anumber of pleasant concerts and entertainments for their benefit.It also permits sacred services to be held Sunday mornings, atthe car barn, and which are conducted by pastors from the diflferentchurches in the city. Mr. A. H. Holmes, president of the Metropolitan Street RailwayCo., of Kansas City, is making preparations for handling thecrowds which will be at the city during the Democratic conventionin July next. The company has had much experience with crowd

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Image from page 57 of “A half century of Minnesota as territory and state; a concise account of the principal events in the period of discovery, exploration, and settlement, and during the half century of territorial and state government” (1900)
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Identifier: halfcenturyofmin01huds
Title: A half century of Minnesota as territory and state; a concise account of the principal events in the period of discovery, exploration, and settlement, and during the half century of territorial and state government
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors: Hudson, Horace B[ushnell] [from old catalog]
Subjects:
Publisher: [Minneapolis, Minn., The Minneapolis journal]
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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Popular Route To. PHir* A riO and all EASTERN POINTS. Connecting: withV-.1 li.^J-^J^ ^j^g ^^^ York and Boston Special. (No change of Depots.) ST LOUIS ^^^ Points Southeast and Southwest. OnlySleeping: Car Line. DES MOINES ^^^^ Omaha, Salt Lake, San Francisco,^ lVl>^li N J-ikj j^^^ Angeles, San Diego. Standard and Compartn^cnt Sleepers Through Tourist cars to Los Angeles, California, Tuesdays via Fort Worth and El Paso, The Sunny Southern Route, Thursdays via Colorado Springs, Salt Lake City and Ogden, The Scenic Route. For particulars address W. L HATHAWAY, City Ticket Agent. No. I Nicollet House Block. Minneapolis.F. P. RUTHERFORD. City Ticket Agent, – – 396 Robert Street, St. Paul. orA. B. CUTTS, General Passenger and Ticket Agent, – – Minneapolis, Minn. So00-000«-»OKK>0000^

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A HALF CENTURY OF MIXXESOTA. building industry has already grown upunder the stimulus of the commerce ofthe great lakes. In late years variouslines of manufacture have developed in re-sponse to modern conditions. Instancesare the beet sugar manufacture, the mak-ing of creamery supplies, the construction(if electrical machinery. While the list ofMinnesota manufactures is so long as toseem to leave nothing out, there remainnnny industries which are not represented:ind to which the state is admirablj- adapt-ed. In i85o it was reported that Minnesotahad 562 manufacturing establishments,with an invested capital of ,388,310. Thecensus of 1870 announced 2,270 establish-ments with a capital of about ,000,000and a product worth over ,000,000. In1880 the census credited the state with3,4q3 manufacturing places, utilizing acapital of ,000,000 and turning out ,-000,000 worth of goods: while in 1890 there DO YOUI SEE THAT BAG? ! It means that ourI STERLING grade of• seed represents

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Image from web page 170 of “COMMERCIAL INTELLIGENCE JOURNAL (CANADA) 1917 pt. 1” (1917)
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Identifier: commercialinte1917p1cana
Title: COMMERCIAL INTELLIGENCE JOURNAL (CANADA) 1917 pt. 1
12 Months: 1917 (1910s)
Writers: CANADA. DEPT. OF TRADE AND TRADE
Subjects:
Publisher:
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Guelph, University of Windsor and University of Toronto Libraries

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T. Lithgow) 73 British western Indies (Mr. E. II. S. Flood) 74 Russia (Mr. C. F. Just) 78 Sash Sections and Ornamental Mouldings (full-page cut)…. 80 Englands Trade with France 82 giving Credits to international subscribers 83 Extracts from Monthly Report for August 89 Canadian create costs in britain 92 British Agricultural create Imports 93 Crops in Cuba 94 marketplace for Machinery in Asia 95 costs of Fruit in Great Britain . 97 Cuban marketplace Conditions 98 Brit Manufacture of Flour and Bread 99 Uk Prohibited Imports 101 British Colonial Imports:— Jamaica 101 Notes on Foreign Trade 106 Canadian Grain Statistics 115 Tenders Invited— Southern Africa 117 Trade Inquiries 118 Publications of the division of Trade and Commerce. . . . 133 Commercial Intelligence Service 134 Enlarged Canadian Trade Intelligence 135 Ottawa; Printed by J. de L. Tach£, printer towards Kings perfect Majesty, 1916. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND COMMERCE INDUSTRIAL INTELLIGENCE DEPARTMENT [ 1 VOL. XVI.

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No. 677. WEEKLY BULLETIN Containing Reports of Trade Commissioners and Commercial Agents,Trade Inquiries and other Commercial Information. * ft;,., ■ /*sv^ f*^£ if JAN ! 61917 MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 1917. ^ >y^/TY0FV Published by Authority of Rt. Hon. Sir George E. Foster, K.C.M.G., M.P. (Minister of Trade and Commerce). OTTAWA PRINTED with J. de L. TACHE,PRINTER INTO KINGS MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 1917 13536—1 ♦ The Commercial Intelligence Provider. The purpose of the Commercial Intelligence provider is always to advertise the sale ofCanadian products abroad and offer Canadian producers and exporterswith details about trade circumstances and opportunities in nations inwhich Canadian goods will probably discover a market. The division gathers, compiles and publishes inside Weekly Bulletin andsupplements thereto a large volume of helpful commercial information. Personsdesiring it and thinking about Canadian manufacturing or expert might have their particular namesplaced on the regular mailing li

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00036936 SDASM
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Image by San Diego Air & Area Museum Archives
Mahoney-Ryan X-1 (X-7621) Special "Sportster", experimental lightplane. Span 27′, size 22′. powered by 90 hp warner Scarab as 1929 protection palne entry with a variable-airfoil wing (no two ribs tend to be alike) controlled by a lever in teh cockpit. No fin or stabilizer, which were changed by alarge, moveable stabilator and a longitudinally-adjusteable 50# fat on a track to shift the c/g. All this work led to enought stability issues to cancel the task. It absolutely was reported that this plane was flown repeatedly by Charles Lindbergh. Circa 1928-29
JMF Haase collection
via San Diego AeroSpace museum

From Haase Range

JMF Haase Collection

This variety of stunning photographs of very early Navy aircraft is from J.M.F. (Joseph Malta F.) Haase collection, thanks to the hillcrest Aero area Museum. J.M.F. “Bunny” Haase ended up being a Navy Chief professional photographer which reported most of the aviation tasks from very early 1920 through early 1930s at North Island that during the time encompassed the Army’s Rockwell Field and NAS north park. His big collection additionally addresses civilian and Army aircraft aswell. Their air-to-air photographs tend to be featured in lots of aviation research books but often under the personal line of credit of US Navy. Chief Haase additionally participated in the next Alaskan Aerial research in 1929 and had been in charge of the first US film for the sun’s eclipse done in 1930 which was done from an aircraft.

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Image from page 26 of “Report of the Bureau of Mines of the Department of Internal Affairs of Pennsylvania” (1899)
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Identifier: reportofbureauof1898penn
Title: Report of the Bureau of Mines of the Department of Internal Affairs of Pennsylvania
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Pennsylvania. Bureau of Mines
Subjects: Pennsylvania. Bureau of Mines Coal mines and mining
Publisher: [Harrisburg] : The Bureau
Contributing Library: The University of Scranton Weinberg Memorial Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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nrivalled coking coal fields, containedwiihin the Blairville basin, from Jacobs creek, its northern bound-ary, to Uniontown and Fairchance, without a break, or from its vastand practically untouched gas and steam coal territory held withinthe Lisbon trough, between the Youghiogheny and Monongahelarivers, this county, or at least its western half, is destined to be-come a vast supply station from which thousands of tons of highgrade fuel wealth are to be distributed far and wide, to meet the wantsof distant communities. This Connellsville seam of coal yields from 8 to 10 feet of work-able coal. The coal is clean, almost free from slate and sulphur, re-markably soft, easily mined and uniform in quality and thickness.The purity of this coal and its chemical and physical characteristicsuTake it peculiarly adapted for coking and gives it great value. It iseasily mined, and cokes with but little care. It is this ease of mining and coking that makes it possible to put coke from this districl

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Coking Pnrrss No. 11. BUREAU OF MINES. xxi iu competition with cokes and fuels in the juost distant parts ofthe United States. History and Growth. During the past quarter of a century many of our largest indus-tries have made their most noticeable advancement, yet none hasmade more rapid strides or been of greater importance and valuethan tlie manufacture of coke. The date of the first production ofcoke is iu doubt. By some authorities it is claimed that it was usedin the United States some years prior to 1770. Be this as it may,the best authenticated history gives Isaac Meason credit for thefirst production of coke in the Connellsville region. In 181G and 1817he built the first rolling mill erected west of the Allegheny moun-tains, at Ilumsock, Fayette county, and this mill went into opera-tion in September of the latter year. The coke was used in the re-hneiy and was made in Fayette county. In 1836, F. H. Oliphantbegan the use of coke as a fuel in Fairchance Furnace. From abouttiiat

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Image from page 18 of “Annual report of the State Board of Equalization of the State of Montana” (1890)
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Identifier: annualreportofst1904mont
Title: Annual report of the State Board of Equalization of the State of Montana
Year: 1890 (1890s)
Authors: Montana. State Board of Equalization
Subjects: Taxation
Publisher: Helena, Mont. : Journal Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Montana State Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Montana State Library

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Image from page 118 of “The political manual, comprising numerous important documents connected with the political history of America” (1864)
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Identifier: politicalmanualc00inhiat
Title: The political manual, comprising numerous important documents connected with the political history of America
Year: 1864 (1860s)
Authors: Hiatt, James M
Subjects: United States — Politics and government Handbooks, manuals, etc
Publisher: Indianapolis, Asher & Adams
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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wards (1758) Washington commanded theVi inti n another expeditiou against the iort, which termx-na ed succcosfully. At the close of this campaign he left the^vnv -ndwas soon after married to Mrs. Martha Custis, (thewido; r (To . I^aniel Farke Custin,) whose maiden name wasDandrid e and whose intelligent and patriotic conduct, as wifeiLd widovv, will ever be grai.efully remembered in American ^ no .as elected to t.e ^^l^^^^^^^^^lj:;:^^^^^^^^^^to that body, ^vith the e^ceptio.i ^f,^^,=; ^^^af Congre s. His well-tempered zealsent to vepreseut Virem|a J^^^^ .^j^^ ^To .^^g^^rihe most proper means for na- reflignedhis comm^siLon. c^avention which wet at Philadelphia for In May, f ^« j^f „X stitutioii, and was at onco called upon to preside over the purpose of forming a Loistuuuo ^^.^^ adopted by the people, he its deliberations. „^f ^,^ d fi^;^ of the United States for four years; was unanimously ^J^-^f .f^J^;4„^a1niou8ly re-elected for a second term year of his age. JOHN ADAMS. lis

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.lOHN ADAMS, THE SECOND PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, And whose fame as a patriot and statesman is imperishable, wasborn at Braintree, Massachusetts, October 19, 1735. He earlydisplayed superior capacity for learning, and s;raduated at Cam-bridge college with great credit. After qualifying himself for 116 JOHN ADAMS. the Ical profession, he was admitted to practice in 1761, and«oon attained tiiat distinction to which his talents wei^e entitled.From the commencement of the troubles with Great Bntam, in176? he was among the most active in securing the freedom ofh 8 country Bein| elected to the first Continental Congress hot^ok a prominent pUrt in all the war measures that were thenTr^La er and Lbsequently suggested the appointment ofWashington as commander-in-chief df the army. He was oneof the committee which reported the Declaration ol Independ-ence nn76. and the nextyear visited France as -m-issionerto form rt treaty of alliance and commerce with that countiy.Al hough the object h

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