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Image from web page 102 of “Old naval days; sketches from lifetime of Rear Admiral William Radford, U. S. N.” (1920)

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Image from page 102 of “Old naval days; sketches through the life of Rear Admiral William Radford, U. S. N.” (1920)
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Identifier: oldnavaldayssket01meis
Title: Old naval times; sketches from life of rear-admiral William Radford, U. S. N.
12 Months: 1920 (1920s)
Writers: Meissner, Sophie Radford de
Topics: Radford, William, 1809-1890
Publisher: New York, H. Holt and business
Adding Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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following the first broad-side was indeed fired. His ship ended up being hulled many times be-tween wind and liquid, five carronades had damaged free, muchof the rigging had been gone, the primary and mizzen-masts were indanger of dropping on the part, and several of their guys had been dis-abled. Perceiving that Cyane had struck. Captain Douglas at-tempted to run, however it was too late. His wheel was shotaway, and his reduced masts have been poorly hurt. After achase of 30 minutes he surrendered, and Lieutenant Ballardwas delivered to take ownership. Lieutenant Hoffman had been onboard the Cyane with a small crew. This fight is noted when it comes to splendid seamanship of theAmericans and gallant behavior regarding the English. CaptainStewart had succeeded, by running and backing from a single shipto others, in fighting each separately, and in stopping hisown ship from being raked. There is nothing finer in ourannals. It was the final great battle associated with the Old Ironsides, because it wasthe final frigate activity associated with war.

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OLD IRONSIDES 8i The success of the War of 1812 can not be credited to onefrigate, yet the Constitution absorbed the greatest number of at-tention as she performed definitely the maximum problems for British armedships upon the sea. Becoming looking for considerable repair works, the old frigate underwenta amount of implemented idleness, lasting about six years, sailingagain in May, 1821, under command of Capt. Jacob Jones forservice as leading of this Mediterranean Squadron. It was dur-ing this cruise, in 1822, that Lord Byron paid the lady a call. When you look at the autumn of 1823, the Constitution had been in Boston for anew staff, sailing in October, 1824, under Capt. Thomas Mac-donough, to join the Mediterranean Squadron, after that immediately to becommanded by Commodore John Rodgers, whose powerful handand rigid control would, the Secretary of this Navy ended up being con-vinced, restore the moral tone and put a conclusion towards the brawlsand battling of duels, also towards the basic dissipation thenrife between the officers regarding the Mediterranean fleet

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Image from web page 412 of “The Times reputation for the war” (1914)
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Identifier: timeshistoryofwa10lond
Title: The Circumstances history of the war
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Writers:
Topics: Times reputation for the war Times record and encyclopaedia associated with the war World War, 1914-1918
Publisher: London
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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AN ARAB. The picture illustrates the problem of acquiring foothold inside sand. taken up to Alexandria for fix. The accidentblocked the traffic regarding the Canal for 14 hoursThis had been the greatest success accomplished by theenemy in the endeavours to reduce communica-tions between the Mediterranean and India. Imperial Service Troops had the credit of alittle affair in which the organizer regarding the Canal

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Ti;F<KFSn ANF) f;HF<MAN OFiF(:F-F<S. LHE TIMES fllsrollY OF Hello We! [AI{. IuiiU lodt liici litf. Oil (i t-iiilMU 23 u hqtiHtlionof MyHor« Lttiu-tTrf, ojwrating 15 miles oaist ofKanturu caine upon u foreti of HO to 70 Turks,the ttclvttnce body of u niicliug ptirty 200 strong.The Lancers pursutil the enemy for severalmiles, killing seven, cuptiuing 12, anil woundingmany others. Among the dead the boily ofthe sheikh Ri/alla Salim was identified. At thiw period, the close of 1915, the Turksand (}erman« had been making severe preparationsfor another advance on Egypt. The Alliescampaign in (lallipoli liad failed while the advanceon Bagdad liad converted into a retreat, while theconquest of Serbia because of the Central Powers and indeed expended in (Jermany from the Armyof Egypt and (ierman soldiers had been delivered toConstantinople—though perhaps not four military corps.Few Germans, save officials, reached Syria.Hut German guns, German ammo, and(ierman equipnent oi all kinds arrived in Syria,where in January

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Image from web page 330 of “Hardware merchandising (January-June 1902)” (1902)
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Identifier: hardmerchjanjun1902toro
Title: Hardware merchandising (January-June 1902)
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Writers:
Subjects: Hardware industry Hardware Implements, utensils, etc Building
Publisher: Toronto :
Contributing Collection: Fisher – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: Algoma University, Trent University, Lakehead University, Laurentian University, Nipissing University, Ryerson University and University of Toronto Libraries

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ENCH Made in 6 sizes. Affordable obtainable. Speciallydesigned for export With or without Emlyn Patent Guard. Single manufacturer— CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, Cables-Machinery, Newport. Emlyn Engineering Works,Newpokt, Mon., England. ONTARIO SILVER CO., Limited, NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. U,n„f„.f„r.r« nf FLATWARE, CUTLERY I brands of ELECTRO PLATE. . .Ask for the Catalogue and Quotations state once again, for it indicates profitto you, the Wrapping Papers among these mills would be thekind to give you satisfaction. Weare mindful inside manufacture ofour wrapping papers, plus in allcases they run full weight and fullcount—480 sheets into ream. CANADA PAPER CO., restricted TORONTO and MONTREAL The Batty Stove& Hardware Co. Successors into the Toronto department of COPP BROS. CO.,Limltod. Wholesale dealers in MANTELS, GRATES, TILES, ETC. HOT-AIR REGISTERS. HOT-AIR DAMPERS. STOVE AND FURNACE CEMENT : 312 and 5-lb. Cans. STOVE POLISH. STOVE REPAIR WORKS. THE BUTTY STOVE i E CO. HAND-FORGED HAND-GROUND

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Completely Warranted.Made In Canada by uni request Catalogue. Producers of Steel-Laid Shears and Scissors,Hand-Forged Butcher Knives and Tinners Snips. BAILEY CUTLERY CO., LIMITED BRANTFORD, ONTARIO CHAS. P. CLARK, President. JARBD CHITTENDEN. Treasurer. .ESTABLISHED 18-49. Capital and Surplus, ,600,000. Workplaces Through The Civilized World. Executive Organizations: Not. 346 and 348 Broadway, Hew Tork City, U.S.A. THE BRAD8TREET COMPANY collects Information tbat reflects the financial condition and thecontrolling circumstances of each and every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business might be understood to be of tbe merchants,because of the merchants, for merchants. In procuring, confirming and promulgating Information, no work Is spared, andno reasonable cost considered also great, that outcomes may Justify its claim as an expert on all mattersaffecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and contacts were steadily extended, and itfurolshes Information concerning mercanti

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Image from web page 26 of “the typical guide” (1896)

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Image from page 26 of “the conventional guide” (1896)
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Identifier: standardguide00reyno
Title: The standard guide
12 Months: 1896 (1890s)
Authors: Reynolds, Charles B. (Charles Bingham), 1856-1940
Topics:
Publisher: St. Augustine, Fla.
Adding Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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tend to be remarkable for antiquity or peculiarity of construc-tion; their particular picturesque side is usually seen through the street. In former times many ofthe homes had been of coquina, a normal shellstone quarried from Anastasia Island, butthis has-been superseded by wood and synthetic cement. To tear down and demolish has-been the rule with foe and buddy alike. Indian, Sea-King, Bou-canier, Brit invader—each consequently has scourged the town; and following the passage of each, it’s risenagain. When we may credit the testimony of site visitors right here, over St. Augustine has actually constantly hung an air of-desolation and decay. Following the successive modifications of rulers, this new has become built from theold. To use the coquina obstructs from a dilapidated framework was less laborious than to hew completely newmaterial through the Anastasia quarries. In this manner were destroyed the coquina batteries, that inold times defended the southern type of the town. The stone from one of them ended up being employed in develop- .^ f r ^ ;?^^.V^ , .

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THK GAKUKNS V1 1 H THKIK PALMS. 14 TIic Standaid Guide. ing the Franciscan convent, and thence it went to the foundation of the barracks, which rose on theconvent site. Another significant coquina passed through a like cycle of usefulness, from outskirt batteryinto parish church, and from parish church to the restoration associated with town gate. Therefore universal, without a doubt, hasbeen this technique of tearing down the old to construct the newest, that we now have few edifices right here to-day,concerning whoever antiquity we’ve satisfactory proof. Boston worships in churches much more ancientthan the cathedral; New Orleans areas are over the age of the disused one in the plaza; Salem wharvesantedate the sea-wall; in the financial institutions for the Connecticut, the Hudson additionally the Potomac stand dwellingsmore venerable than any here on Matanzas.—Old St. Augustine. The folks found when you look at the streets aren’t the picturesque beings described in thebooks of travel written fifty years back. Many tourists expect you’ll discover here a Spanish populace. T

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Image from web page 9 of “Western electrician” (1887)
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Identifier: westernelectrici16chic
Title: Western electrician
Year: 1887 (1880s)
Authors:
Topics: Electrical manufacturing
Publisher: Chicago : [Electrician Pub. Co.]
Contributing Library: MIT Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Associate Libraries

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on any feeder area, or bothhouses can work in numerous on anyone or all feeder sec-tions. Direct telephone link involving the two sta-tions enables them to work in perfect equilibrium under allconditions of load as well as other demands. After midnightthe new place is shut down therefore the old place thencarries the owl automobile load uniil early morning. automobile SHEDS. Inside rear regarding the new power household is found the carshed, maybe not visible when you look at the view. The shed currently is 400feet long, 65 feet wide and 22 foot high, and contains a storagecapacity for 60 forty-foot automobiles. There’s ample groundspace for improvements to car sheds and power household. Asidefrom the car sheds during the new section there is also a largershed at- Newstead and Fairfax avenues, having a storage capacity for 150 forty-eight-foot automobiles. At Vandevenler andFinney ways there’s a small shed and mechanic shop, whilethe general mechanic shop Is on Chouteau avenue, near Jeffer-son opportunity. The moving stock gear is comprised of no lengthy vehicles, 60

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FIG. 3. THE NEW POWER STATION REGARDING THE LINDELLRAILWAY COMPANY, ST. LOUIS.—PUMP ROOM. sixteen-foot automobiles and 30 trail automobiles. The total mileage ofthe system is 56 miles of single track. JX GENERAL. Numerous information on the water and steam solution have beenomitted inside condensed information. Tlie main objectkept in view in designing the station was to secure economyand stability of procedure in just about every information, and also to provideample means for cleaning, repairs, alterations and all possi-ble problems. Asa whole the newest station is an excellentillustration of a planned, well constructed street rail-way energy station, and reflects much credit on manage-ment. The officials regarding the company are: President, EdwardsWhitaker; vice-president, Chas. D. McLure; assistant and January 5, 1S95 WESTERN ELECTRICIAN. treasurer, Ja>. Adkinaon; superintendent, G.W. BaumhoPf;electrical engineer, A. W. irorrell. Under the directionof these gentlemen thestation had been in the pipeline and constructed. Rumored Down-town

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Image from web page 890 of “Baltimore and Ohio staff members magazine” (1912)
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Identifier: baltimoreohioemp04balt
Title: Baltimore and Ohio employees mag
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio staff members magazine Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Topics: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Publisher: [Baltimore, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, University Park
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Users and Sloan Foundation

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SECTION FOREMAN C. C. WESTERN AND HLS GANG. MR. WEST LS INDICATED BY (XI THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MACAZINE

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RITTEXHOUSE On additional 2545east,on November 11,while on siding atSumner for Xo. 47,hrakeman J. H.Rittenhouse, in look-ing over his train,found a defect ive con-dition on car X.& W.67922. A credit en-try has been made onhis solution record. Regarding the afternoon of Septembers, L. Sanders,extra group foreman working western of Lawrence-ville, noticed a defective problem on a coachin train number 1. He immediately reported thiscondition towards the telegraph company in advance.A credit entry has been positioned on his record. Toledo Division On October 19 conductor C. W. Wildt, offduty, found a defective track condition atDeshler and flagged train No. 93. He thenmade a study regarding the matter and fixes weremade. On October 6 con- ^d u c t o roentgen J . C .Saunders, at NorthBaltimore, on theBowling Green sub-division, observed adefective conditionon a passing train.He reported the con-dition, the train wasstopped as well as the de-fect discovered.

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Image from page 1088 of “Milwaukee, Wisconsin, city directory” (1922)

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Image from page 1088 of “Milwaukee, Wisconsin, city directory” (1922)
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Identifier: milwaukeewiscons01unse_1
Title: Milwaukee, Wisconsin, city directory
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: Polk
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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rola L multl oiir Mil Title Guaranty iV: AbstractCo rlllO 9th Garolino M sten F A Vaughn Inc r3S2 t)-iklaiid av Carter student f531 Marshall Cecilia (wid Wm) h373H 14Ui Clias (Evfiyn A) mgr Credit Clearing House hS49Indiana av Chas A treas Geo Martin Leather Co h699 Far-well ay Chas F (Lydia) elee nig h5^8 KusscU av Chas G (Lois M) gard h766 29tli Chas J (May) niaeJi h732 Piyor av Chas L slsmn Hill Joiner & Co h9. 674 Van Buren Chas O (Lena) lab h570 19tli av Chas K (Aiidie) sis eng Allis-Chalmeis Mfs Co hSlS 35tll Clara (wid Geo) h707 BulTum Clarence apijr r643 Greenfield av <ilarence student r531 Marshall Clarence student rl271 22d Clarence T maeh rll33 olli Cook (Clara) poUsher h819 11th Danl (Edna) maeh h3416 Mt Vernon av Danell E (Matliilda) eng hl523 Hadley David lab r rear 608 Galena Dora (wid Flurian J) hl744 Pt Wash «t- Douglass cupola tndr rl41 5th D K hl46. 830 State Earl ironwkr r521 Grovo Edw r Soldiers Homo Edw rlllO 26th Edw heater rl410 26th Edw hliir rl96 27th

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COMPLETEDIRECTORY OF BANKSBANKERSTRUSTCOMPANIES ANDSavings Banks in theUnited Statesand Canada Their OfficersLiabilitiesResourcesCorrespondentsand Other Valu-able Data Con-cerning Banks,Etc., Etc. lOR SALE BV R.L.PoIk & Co. DETROIT TRESTER SERVICE ELECTRIC CO. 47 ONEIOA STREET BROADWAY 4360 Motors and General Repairing,

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Image from page 326 of “Railway mechanical engineer” (1916)
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Identifier: railwaymechanica95newy
Title: Railway mechanical engineer
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects: Railroad engineering Engineering Railroads Railroad cars
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Simmons-Boardman Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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so faras making the delivering line responsible. The owner isfully protected at the time the repair card is rendered. Ifyou take out a pair of steel wheels and put in cast wheels,you owe the owner of the car some credit on the wheel. Hehas the right to get joint evidence and secure the same protec-tion that he gets on other wrong repairs. He is not entitledto any other protection. The motion was seconded. F. C. Schultz: I used to feel that I could locate the manthat put in the wrong wheels, but I cannot. They makechanges without knowing they put them in. Inasmuch asthe owner is protected, I think that this is entirely consistent. A. Herbster: I think all of this change of wheels fromrolled steel to cast iron took place during the railroad admin-istration when no defect cards were applied. All of a suddenon a certain day the game was off and everybody commencedto slap on defect cards. That is the reason you could notlocate the fellow that made the wrong repairs. The motion was carried.

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Uniform Heat Treatment of Steel* BY H. C. LOUDENBECK.Engineer of Material, Union Switch & Signal Co., Swissvale, Pa. To obtain uniform results in the heat treatment of steelis one of the most difficult of the heat treaters problems.Satisfactory results are dependent upon certain precautionswhich are often overlooked by the manufacturer. As a typicalexample, steel is purchased according to a specification thatgives the desired physicalproperties when properly heattreated. The order is acceptedby the steel mill and the steelmanufactured and rolled ac-cordingly. It is inspected bythe purchasers inspector whoadvises that it corresponds tothe specification both chem-ically and physically and theshipment of the steel is thenauthorized. After it is receivedby the purchaser and perhapsretested, and he is satisfiedthat the proper heat has beenshipped, it is unloaded in thestock yard either in a pile byitself or unloaded on a pilesupposed to be of the samespecification. It is afterward disc

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Image from page 48 of “Christian herald and signs and symptoms of our times” (1891)
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Identifier: christianheralds14unse
Title: Christian herald and signs and symptoms of our times
12 Months: 1891 (1890s)
Writers:
Topics:
Publisher: [Brand New York, The Christian Herald]
Adding Library: Christian Herald Association
Digitizing Sponsor: Tisch Library, Tufts University

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nowwhat you indicate. Why ? repeated Towneley. Oh,nothing but what is honorable. I happened to be comingto see you about this. Well, you come to-night after that. We dontmean having any nonsense, so that the sooner youspeak from better. Ill anticipate you to-night.Abram shouldered his resources once more and walkedaway, leaving Gerald meditative into the road.The young man, more depressed than in the past, thenresumed their stroll toward the inn. He’d to pass the Hermitage and then he wassurprised while he performed so to see its tenant, Mr.Magrath, in a handsome dog-cart, with GeorgeAppleton by their side. They were evidentlysetting aside for a drive collectively. George Appleton had manifested these types of abilityin connection with the repair works within Her-mitage that Mr. Magrath felt justified inemploying him in only a matter of much larger im-portance. Properly, that morning Georgereceived a request from their brand new manager thathe would accompany him on a short journeyof some six or seven kilometers on a matter of busi-ness. Nothing loth, George ended up being quickly at

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A Jewish School in Cairo. the gate associated with Hermitage where in actuality the dog-cart ended up being standing. Mr. Magrath waited forGeorge to install, and they at the same time drove offat a brisk speed in direction of TowneleyChase. Discussion amongst the two turned on theTowneleys, whose lands they were skirting. That Squire Towneley is apparently a fineold man, stated Mr. Magrath. A real specimen of the guy, saidGeorge. Yes, sir. Squire Towneley will passhis assessment with credit. By the way, it’s noised overseas that youngTowneley features fixed covetous eyes on MissMansford, your old masters quite niece. Isthere everything because report, you think ? I hope perhaps not, said George, dramatically. Instead a flirting lassie, proceeded Magrath,•« I am afraid. Will she angle successfully,do youthink, and land her fish ? Certainly, sir, you are altogether mistaken inthe estimation you have created of Nora Mansford.Shes as good as gold. For all she does she hasgood and truthful reason Ill risk my life onit. As for youthful Gerald Towneley

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Image from page 376 of “Railway mechanical engineer” (1916)
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Identifier: railwaymechanica89newy
Title: Railway mechanical engineer
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects: Railroad engineering Engineering Railroads Railroad cars
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Simmons-Boardman Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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ring the day and then j^uess at the other half,some familiar general expense charge usually being used. Anoticeable evil of tlie system was that the workmen would, inorder to accommodate the foreman, knowing that he is trying toget a low production cost, cut off a little lime from the actualtime worked, to help matters along. The new system gives acorrect time record. All charges are made to a T. S. O. account,or to the standing shop order in the event of some small job onwhich a cost has already been olitained. There is no generalexpense account such as shop machinerypairs. If time is spent in making repairs toor grinding tools, and similar work, the time to account A, which is the central ti count. This expense is takenat the end of the month. and tools or tool re- a tool room machine wiirkmaii charges his d room expense ac- care of when the books are closed Tools formeiit in tile sliipnunt tocentral to,,l lUtside points are wrapped for shi])-■om and delicreil to the storekeeper

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Illinois Central Tool Catalog together with reijuisition showing the charges. If the order istilled in full, the requisition is held by the store department,but if not, it is returned after being checked with the goodsdelivered. The tool room copies the order into a record bookwhen first received, which serves as their record. .-NCCOrXTIXG The pricing of goods shipped is done by the tool department.When a shipment is made up. tlie price of each article is en-tered on the requisition which goes with the goods to the storedepartment, this serving as an invoice of the goods shipped.A double-entry bookkeeping system is maintained and the booksare closed into profit and loss account at the end of each monthto ascertain whether the selling prices are higli enough to cover all exjienses. .Ml work delivered from tlie central tool room isregarded as a sale and an entry made in the journal chargingthe consignee and crediting sales. A card index record of allgoods shipped to outside points is ke

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Image from page 29 of “Campbell’s new revised third edition complete guide and descriptive book of the Yellowstone Park” (1916)
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Identifier: campbellsnewrevi1916camp
Title: Campbell’s new revised third edition complete guide and descriptive book of the Yellowstone Park
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors: Campbell, Reau
Subjects:
Publisher: Chicago : H.E. Klamer
Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

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give them credit for their defense of inherent rights. Ge neraland out ofto the Yel-bridge,some delaythe Park General THE SUNSET GUN—FORT YELLOWSTONE Howard pursued the fleeing Nez Perces into the Parkit. After leaving Camp Cowan, he followed the traillowstone River and down that stream to Baronettswhich the Indians had partially destroyed, causingfor repairs; in the meantime the Nez Perces had leftby way of Miller Creek. Howard had a most extraordinary engineer corps com-posed of fifty-two mountaineers picked up in Idaho,organized and placed under com-mand of Capt. -W. F. Spurgin;each man owned his horse andequipment. As they were notreally engineers they were classedas skilled laborers, and assuch, paid three dollars per day.It did not take many days forthe soldiers to condense theskilled laborers to the Skill-ets. They did remarkable workbut they could not make roadsas fast as General Howardwanted to move, yet the Skill-ets did cut their way throughthe forests over Mary Mountain,

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28 from the Lower Basin to the heights of the shores of the Yellowstone Riverwhere Spurgin let his wagons down with ropes to the river bank; this wascalled Spurgins Beaver Slide. Then he was up with Howards army,crossed the Yellowstone twice, furnished his General with a pack train ofample capacity, and from Cascade Creek took his wagons to Fort Elliswithout losing a wheel. A tablet near the Upper Falls marks the spot of*Spurgins Beaver Slide. Now the Nez Perces had Howard and Gibbon in their rear, with GeneralMiles and General Sturgis in front, and turned their direction northward with

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