Free Credit Score vs Free Credit Report Gov

Bottomline, lenders use your credit SCORES to make loan decisions. Not your credit reports. The details in your credit reports are like the exam questions and your SCORES are the final grade you get. This grade or number is what lenders, bank loan officers, and creditors, will use to approve or disapprove your loan requests or to set your loan interest rates to every type of loan request – mortgage Loans, auto loans, personal loans, credit cards, etc. If you’re on a job hunt, a potential employer may perform a credit check to see if you are financially responsible. Problem is, you’ll need to pay each credit bureau for the privilege of seeing your scores. Your scores are NOT included in your free annual credit report (aka free credit report gov). Fortunately there are services like the ones listed in the chart below which can help you obtain a free credit score.

Offer Name: Our Rating:
Free Credit Scores Received: Bureaus Monitored: Trial Period: Benefits:


See Offer

All 3 Scores:
TransUnion
Equifax
Experian
TransUnion
Equifax
Experian
Free 7-day Trial All Free 3 Credit Scores.
3 Bureau Credit Monitoring.


See Offer

All 3 Scores:
TransUnion
Equifax
Experian
TransUnion
Equifax
Experian
Free 7-day Trial All Free 3 Credit Scores.
3 Bureau Credit Monitoring.


See Offer

Single Credit Score TransUnion
Equifax
Experian
Free 7-day Trial Free Credit Score. $1 Credit Report.
3 Bureau Credit Monitoring.


See Offer

Single Credit Score TransUnion
Equifax
Experian
Free 7-day Trial Free Credit Score.
3 Bureau Credit Monitoring.


See Offer

Single Credit Score TransUnion
Equifax
Experian
Free 7-day Trial Free Credit Score From TransUnion.
3 Bureau Credit Monitoring.

THIS NOTICE IS REQUIRED BY LAW. Read more at FTC.GOV. You have the right to a free credit report from AnnualCreditReport.com or 8773228228, the ONLY authorized source under federal law annualcreditreport.com

Credit Reports and Credit Scores. What’s the difference?

A credit score is a score based on the information on your credit report. Using unique algorithms to calculate your score. Information such as punctuality of payment such as mortgage loan payments, credit card monthly payments, auto loan payments, etc. Other factors which go into the calculation include the total ratio of debt versus the amount of credit limit you have. ex: You have a credit card where the credit limit is $10,000. Your debt balance is around $3000+. (You still have the ability to spend $7000 on this particular credit card}. What you don’t want to do is to max out on that credit. These factors can influence your credit scores. Length of your credit history is also a factor. The longer you credit history, the better. The size of your credit limits is also a factor. In the US, the a FICO credit score is well known. It utilizes it’s own unique mathematical algo to calculate your score. There are additionally different services that uses its own unique algo to calculate your score. Beacon, Empirica, just to name a few. FICO scores vary from 300-850 wherein a score under 600 is considered “bad” while a score above 720 is considered “good”. Other scores have a different number range and hence a different figure for what’s considered good or bad.

Credit reports on the otherhand contain the detailed transactions that go into figuring out your credit scores. Lenders may quickly peruse your credit reports especially if you have a bad score to point out why your scores are bad. But they ultimately will rely on your scores to set loan interest rates, approve or deny you credit, etc. They do not actually calculate your scores. They leave that to the aforementioned services and their algos. Potential employers, landlords, etc often utilize your scores as well. Not just lenders. But your free annual credit report from does NOT include your scores. Several firms – usually credit monitoring services and identity theft protection services – will often provide your credit scores during their free trial offer period. You can also purchase your scores individually from each of the 3 major credit bureaus – TransUnion, Equifax, and Experian.

Does subscribing to credit monitoring services make sense?

Consider these facts: Over 1 in 10 americans will become a victim of identity theft or credit fraud. Average losses incurred are said to be over $5000 per individual. This is when you rely solely on paper statements to monitor your credit. On the otherhand, studies have shown how those who utilize credit monitoring services only reach losses of around 1/10th of that amount ($500+) because they’re quickly alerted to any fraudulent credit activity. And since pretty much all credit monitoring services have some sort of identity theft insurance in place (up to $1 million in some cases), any losses you’d incur from identity theft or credit fraud is quickly recovered.

Related Free Credit Score Articles

3 Suggestions To Fix Credit Before Buying A Home


Chicago, IL (PRWEB) February 20, 2015

whenever first-time homebuyers believe they are eventually willing to purchase a house, The Federal Savings Bank highly encourages them to check on their credit first. Not just do their particular credit histories influence their particular opportunities for endorsement, their credit ratings could affect the attention rates offered for mortgages. Assure loan providers, like Federal Savings Bank, look favorably on mortgage programs, homebuyers could follow these three steps to fix their credit:

1. Examine their particular credit scores

The initial step first-time homebuyers takes to correct their credit is to request their credit history. The report will break-down their payment records, records unsealed, their particular credit scores and other information loan providers may also see such as your free credit reports from all 3 bureaus. Borrowers should review their particular reports and determine whether there are items which are inaccurate or missing. Consumers are able to receive a free content of these credit history once every one year from each one of the three significant credit scoring bureaus – Equifax, Experian and TransUnion – based on the U.S. Federal Trade Commission.

2. Contact the credit rating bureaus and creditors

If consumers look for there will be something incorrect due to their credit history, they need to contact the credit bureau that generated the report – also lenders noted on these reports. Consumers should contact the credit reporting business either through a written letter or an internet type explaining something incorrect towards report and provide proof along with their conflicts.

3. Hold other records in great standing

As first-time home buyers watch for a response from credit reporting companies about their particular credit history disputes, they need to ensure their other accounts stay static in great standing – that’s, that they have no unfavorable information of these credit responsibilities – by having to pay expenses promptly, in accordance with Freddie Mac.

First-time homebuyers willing to purchase a home can get in touch with the Federal Savings Bank, a veteran possessed lender, for more information on mortgages.


Credit Report Secrets: Do You Know What They Reveal?

If you’ve ever applied for a credit card or loan, you’ve probably had your credit report reviewed by the lender. Your credit report has a huge impact on your financial future, so it’s well worth your time to be sure that you understand what your credit report says about you. Even if you’re not interested in obtaining credit, your credit report can impact other areas of your life. Potential employers view your credit report to assess your trustworthiness as an employee. Landlords frequently check the credit reports of their tenants before allowing them to sign or renew their lease.

So whether you knew it or not, your credit report can have a major impact on your quality of life. With this said I’m sure you can now see that there is a benefit to obtaining and then verifying that the information on your credit report is accurate and true.

You can request copies of your free credit reports from all 3 bureaus: Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion. A recent amendment to the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act requires each of these national consumer-reporting companies to provide you with a yearly free copy of your credit report upon your request.

Basically, your credit report is a summary of how you pay your bills; repay loans; how much credit you have available; what your monthly debts are; and other types of information that can help a prospective lender decide if you are a good credit risk.

Your credit report is made up of several sections. The first section contains personal identifying information such as your name, current and previous addresses, social security number, telephone number, birth date, and your current and previous employers.

Your bill paying history with banks, retail stores, finance companies mortgage companies, and others who have granted you credit is one of the most important parts of your credit report. Public records that might indicate your credit worthiness, such as tax liens, court judgments, and bankruptcies are also included in the section detailing your credit history.

Your credit report includes a comprehensive listing of all credit granters and other individuals who have received a copy of your credit report. In addition, lists of companies that have received your name and address in order to offer you credit are also included in your credit report.

Most credit bureaus allow both the consumer and the creditor to make statements if there is a dispute about something on the report. If applicable, your credit report will include these dispute statements.

Your credit report does not include bank account balances, race, religion, health, criminal records, driving records, or annual income. You’ve probably heard about a FICO credit score as well. Credit scores are based on formulas that use the information in your report, but they’re not considered part of your credit report.

Problems with your credit report will result in you either being denied credit or receiving a higher interest rate. Red flags on your credit report include excessive applications for additional credit, a short credit history, high debt ratio, and late payments to previous creditors. In most cases, negative information will stay on your report for seven years. However, bankruptcy information stays on your credit report for ten years.

To help improve your credit report, always remember to close unused accounts, pay your bills on time, never use all of your available credit, and don’t apply for unnecessary credit.

source: http://ezinearticles.com/?expert=Dave_Robinson

Disturbing Facts About Identity Theft

As I researched a series of articles about identity theft, I came across a lot of statistics.  The shudder down my spine grew colder and more intense with every number.

Did you know that only 20 percent of identity theft involves credit card fraud?  It’s true, according to the latest statistics available from the Federal Trade Commission.  Identity thieves use stolen information in countless ways.  Without giving the bad guys any ideas, let’s just say that they can mess up your entire life, not just your credit.

Furthermore, only 11 percent of identity theft is committed by high-tech methods, and 48 percent is committed by someone known to the victim.  This means that the receptionist at your dentist’s office or a hotel clerk is the one who is most likely to steal your identity, not the zit-faced hacker in the Ukraine.  Even if you shred every document, never lose your wallet, and never touch a computer, you can be victimized.  Unless you plan on physically looking over everyone’s shoulders all the time, you had better find another way to protect yourself.  

Why bother worrying about it?  Because identity theft is an easy crime to commit, and it is being committed more and more often, rising from 2007 to 2008 alone by 22 percent. In fact, the incidence of identity theft has risen steadily for the past decade.  With the economy mired in the doldrums, this trend will surely continue.  

Why is identity theft increasing?  Desperate people who wouldn’t otherwise turn to crime see it as almost a “victimless crime” since fraud protection laws now place most of the financial burden on banks.  These people get to work quickly once they have your information.

Here is another fact about identity theft:  The damage happens fast (usually beginning within one week of the information being acquired, according to the FTC), but it takes many aggravating hours (over 70 on average) to undo if it can be done at all.  Some people do not find out that they have been victimized until years later when the IRS audits them for income attributed to their Social Security number but not claimed on thier taxes.  Other people find out that the thief has committed other crimes and used thier stolen identity when caught.  Imagine learning that you’ve been arrested for burglary in another state!

The key to avoiding all this is to remember the adage, “Prevention is the best medicine.”  Identity theft is like a disease in the sense that preventing it is preferable to treatment.  In the event that you get the disease, early diagnosis and treatment are the best way to beat it.  

Which brings us to the good news:  Tools have been developed to help people protect themselves, and these are becoming better and less expensive all the time.  If you have anything to lose, the facts say you should look into them. 

Get more facts and identity theft protection tools!

More Identity Theft Prevention Articles

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