Image from page 210 of “The world’s inhabitants; or, Mankind, animals, and plants; being a popular account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the great continents and principal islands” (1888)
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Identifier: worldsinhabitant00bett
Title: The world’s inhabitants; or, Mankind, animals, and plants; being a popular account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the great continents and principal islands
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Bettany, G. T. (George Thomas), 1850-1891
Subjects: Civilization Culture
Publisher: London Ward, Lock
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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est sown in Greece morethan a score of centuries ago. At last Greece, having de- conquest bygenerated, was conquered by the northern State of Macedon, Macedon.half Greek, half barbarian; and Macedon, aided by Greece proper, sub-jugated Asia. This conquest diffused Greek culture and rule very widely,but weakened the Greeks at home. As our great Greek scholar, Professor Jebb, writers, The. Hellenesset the Hellenic stamp on everything which they create. Every elementof their life receives its mature shapefrom themselves, even when the germhas been borrowed; the Hellenes are anoriginal people in the sense that theyeither invent or transform. At a veryearly time they have the political life ofcities, and they never rise from the con-ception of the city to the higher unity ofthe nation. … As the leading commonrwealths grow to maturity, two principlesof government stand out in contrast—oligarchy and democracy. Each is re-presented by a great city round whichthe lesser States are grouped.

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THEMISTOCLES. OligarchyThe inevitable collision comes, and 1,1 / i- o – democracy, and the representative 01 de-mocracy is at last vanquished. But inthe hour of victory oligarchy is dis-credited by the selfish ambition of itschampion ; a time of political confusion follows, in which no one city cankeep a leading place. Separate interests prevail over, piinciples ; publicspirit declines. The dissension of the cities,—incurable because arisingfrom a deep inner decay,—-enables the crafty king of a half-barbariancountry to make himself the militar}^ dictator, of Greece. But just whenthe better days of Hellenic civiUsation seem to be over, a new career isopened to it. Men who are not of Hellenic hload help to diffuse theHellenic language, thought, and manners over a wider field, and the lifeof the modern Greek nation begins. The conquest of Macedonia and Greece by Eome finally destroyedtheir national life, while widely diffusing Greek culture andphilosophy, which greatly influenced th

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